Contacted multiple times for same empty shift

  1. At one of my jobs I've been contacted four or five times regarding an empty shift tomorrow night. The latest contact was demanding that I call back whether I wanted to work or not. I've already told them several times that I can't work due to a previous commitment.


    I decided to ignore the call and go on with my life.
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  2. 64 Comments

  3. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    They seem to want you to work. Have you given it a second thought? That's probably them calling right now.
  4. by   Davey Do
    Quote from Emergent
    The latest contact was demanding that I call back whether I wanted to work or not.
    Sure, I'll call you back.

    Lessee- you left me a message at about 2pm, the middle of my sleep session, so I'll return your call at about 2am, the middle of your sleep session.

    Can I have your home phone number?
  5. by   kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so. Obviously once you are on the phone they plan to try and guilt/ pressure you into accepting the shift. Be ready to politely and firm restate "I am unavailable".
  6. by   vanilla bean
    Quote from kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so..
    I completely disagree. IMO, my personal time is my own and I owe my employer nothing when I'm off the clock.
  7. by   ponymom
    Why tell them you 'cant' come in? That already implies that you feel guilty, which gives them something to grab onto.

    Tell them you 'don't want' to come in.
  8. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from Emergent
    The latest contact was demanding that I call back whether I wanted to work or not.
    Isn't it such a shame when our plans involve going somewhere without cell reception? Guess you'll have to call them back when you get the voicemail. After that shift has ended.
  9. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from ponymom
    Why tell them you 'cant' come in? That already implies that you feel guilty, which gives them something to grab onto.

    Tell them you 'don't want' to come in.
    Can't doesn't imply guilt. It implies inability to do so.

    I'm sorry, but... is the phrase I'd stay away from.
  10. by   JKL33
    Quote from kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so.
    Over time it is often in one's best interest to maintain appropriate boundaries with regard to this. It can be very difficult to prioritize family and other obligations when constantly faced with the guilt routine. Having to say, "No, I can't help" repeatedly doesn't feel good (in and of itself). Feeling pressured to explain your personal plans and/or give a rationale for why you need to say no - which someone will undoubtedly make a judgment about...none of this is good. This is a pretty common occurrence in the ED; daily or even more than daily in some places.

    The kind and professional thing is to let them know one is unavailable - which the OP has already done.
  11. by   Purple_roses
    Quote from kp2016
    If they are demanding that you call them back it is in your best interests to do so. Obviously once you are on the phone they plan to try and guilt/ pressure you into accepting the shift. Be ready to politely and firm restate "I am unavailable".
    I really don't think OP should feel obligated to do that unless OP was on call. If you're not on call, employers should respect time off. OP could always say something like "I was unable to return your call because I was sleeping....or at a movie....or just don't have my phone by me at every waking moment." Or if OP is as snarky as I can sometimes be, say something like "oh I didn't know I had signed paperwork indicated I was accepting an on call position!"
  12. by   BSN16
    this was how it was for me at a previous facility. They would send out texts-which is fine. but then charge would start personally calling people individually. Asking questions like WHY cant you come in etc??
  13. by   caliotter3
    Quote from vanilla bean
    I completely disagree. IMO, my personal time is my own and I owe my employer nothing when I'm off the clock.
    This thought comes to mind especially when I think of all those times that an employer could think of me, but chooses not to. One example, cancelling my shift on a holiday to give the shift to another person so they can get the holiday pay, or scheduling everyone else for the holiday, and holiday pay, except me. They don't hesitate to call you when it suits them when no one else wants to be bothered, but when it could benefit you, and you've let it be known when you are available for these 'extras', everybody else comes first.
  14. by   greenerpastures
    I'm on vacation. I left a note on the schedule not to call me between date A &B. They called two days into my vacation. I contacted a coworker to put the note BACK on the schedule that someone had removed, because, obviously, they didn't get my point!

    Don't ever feel guilty about not calling back, or for not answering when they call. I tell people all the time "This is my job, not my life."

    Also, I get mad when people call me in the middle of the day if I'm sleeping; how about I call you in the middle of the night to see if you want to work? OH WAIT, you're already on the schedule, SORRY to wake you!

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