confused over titles !!

  1. 0
    Forgive my ignorance... was reading some of the posts here and well quite frankly I'm confused ! I'm a UK RGN, USA seems to have so many "different" nurse titles, and yet ya all nurses !! Here in the UK we used to have 2 tier nursing RGN and SEN, registered and enrolled, one being a bedside nurse the other the same but with managment responsibilities blah, blah, blah we now have only one qualification RGN, be it diploma or degree, can someone please explain all these tiers you seem to have!!
    Thanx

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  2. 45 Comments...

  3. 0
    Tina,
    Let me attempt at an explanation.
    MSN = Master of Science in Nursing. People with this degree are usually in management, teaching positions or nurse practitioner roles. (Nurse practitioners are similar to physician assistants.)
    BSN = Bachelor of Science in Nursing. These nurses are often bedside RN's but with the extra schooling are often in management roles also.
    RN = Registered Nurse. These people have a diploma or associates degree in nursing. This comprises most of the bedside RN's. They are also used as charge nurses for their unit of the hospital.
    Now it gets a little confusing:
    LVN/LPN = These are Licensed Vocational nurses. They attend school for approximately one year learning basic nursing skills. They don't recieve the critical thinking skill teaching that RN's or above get. Depending on what state they work in, they have roles differing from something near to what RN's do with bedside nursing to activities closer to what a nurse aide does.
    CNA/NA/PCA = These are nurse aides or unlicensed personnel. Some are certified and some are given technical skill training in certain tasks to be a patient care assistant.

    This may have just made your confusion worse! I hope it helps a little!

  4. 0
    Originally posted by ClariceS:
    Tina,
    Let me attempt at an explanation.
    MSN = Master of Science in Nursing. People with this degree are usually in management, teaching positions or nurse practitioner roles. (Nurse practitioners are similar to physician assistants.)
    BSN = Bachelor of Science in Nursing. These nurses are often bedside RN's but with the extra schooling are often in management roles also.
    RN = Registered Nurse. These people have a diploma or associates degree in nursing. This comprises most of the bedside RN's. They are also used as charge nurses for their unit of the hospital.
    Now it gets a little confusing:
    LVN/LPN = These are Licensed Vocational nurses. They attend school for approximately one year learning basic nursing skills. They don't recieve the critical thinking skill teaching that RN's or above get. Depending on what state they work in, they have roles differing from something near to what RN's do with bedside nursing to activities closer to what a nurse aide does.
    CNA/NA/PCA = These are nurse aides or unlicensed personnel. Some are certified and some are given technical skill training in certain tasks to be a patient care assistant.

    This may have just made your confusion worse! I hope it helps a little!

    :EEK: Thanx Clarice, LOL, OMG!! how do you all cope ?? Doubt if I will be able to understand the postings from USA nurses, ever, regarding gripes with co workers, You all have my admiration working with so many job specs... thanx again from the UK ~~~> still LOL

  5. 0
    GET REAL!!!!
    LPN/LVN...."WE DON'T RECEIVE THE CRITICAL NSG SKILL TEACHING THE RN'S DO- AND, WE'RE ONLY TAUGHT BASIC NURSING SKILLS." HUMMMMM...I MUST OF BEEN IN THE WRONG CLASSROOM.
    YOU SILLY RN....
  6. 0
    [OOPPSS... I seem to have caused an argument with my query here.... but is it any wonder with all those differing qualifications !!! you must all get really ****** off with everyones different interpretations of your training & responsibilities !!!
  7. 0
    NO offence meant iris! I have taught both LVN's and RN's. RN's do have longer training including more case study work toward critical thinking skills. I am not saying that my LVN's haven't developed those skills (some better than RN's) through their experience time.
    Didn't mean to start off anything. Just trying to explain some differences!
  8. 0
    Don't forget that there are also nurses with their doctorate in nursing! ;-)
    Nurses w/ PhDs in Nursing can be found in: management,teaching,research,advanced practice,even at the bedside.
  9. 0
    Actually, a nurse practitioner is not 'similar' to a physician's assistant at all [If you are basing your statement on the ability to write prescriptions, just remember that prescriptive privileges are but a very small part of the nurse practitioner's role]. Depending upon state of practice, many N.P.'s have independent practice. P.A.'s, regardless of the state in which they practice, are always required to have a supervising pysician.

    Another role forgotten is that of the clinical nurse specialist [C.N.S.] this is another type of advanced practice registered nurse [A.P.R.N.]. They perform many of the same functions as the N.P. [depending upon state licensure regulations, etc., they may even write prescriptions]. Their focus, however, tends to be more on education, consultation and administration, in addition to practice.

    All of the 'titles' are confusing, I agree, and it has led to the problem of nursing being taken as seriously by other professions as it should be. If you want to be a physician, you go 4 years to college, 4 years to medical school, and do a prescribed number of years in residency... end of debate. Here in the U.S.A., a nurse can become an LPN/LVN or an ADN or a Diploma RN or obtain a BSN, when last I heard, there are even one or two programs out there that give an MSN as the basic practice degree [upon conferring the MSN, the individual is eligible for licensure as an RN]. Some programs even give DNS [doctorate of nursing science] for people who have doctoral degrees in other subjects and wish to become RN's.

    Hopefully, one day, nursing will get it's act together educationally. I doubt it will happen in my lifetime, but hopefully some day...
  10. 0
    Tina,
    Sure gets confusing doesn't it?!?!?!?
  11. 0
    Oh my !!! We in the UK also have specialist nurses, ie: Nurse Practitioners, clinicians, practice nurses etc, but they are all RGN's,
    Our nursing aides are encouraged to take the NVQ, (National Vocational Qualification) but they are not recompensed in terms of salary!! nor do they have a governing body, you seem to have a whole alphabet of qualifications.. yes Clarice it is very confusing LOL.



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