code help

  1. this is my first post so i,m hoping for a positive reply.
    we recently hired several nurses who have come from long term care and have very limited code experiance, which was a major problem when we had our first code and i was the only old nurse there. I should also say that I work on a med surg floor. so how can we help educate these nurses, we are planning a mock code, which we will video and use for all new hires as part of their orientation, also planning a scavenger hunt of the code cart so they can quickly locate et tube , laryngoscope, know how to apply quick patches and other leads but what else could we do? PLEASE HELP, this is a real concern and I need help ASAP.
    thank you all for all you help, also I would love to get in the chat room and chit chat just tell me what time is the best to log on.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   kaycee
    I think the mock code and scavenger hunt are a very good idea. Maybe take it further by having mock codes every month or so if you have time to keep it fresh in their minds. I think no matter what you do in a real situation minds can go blank but the more familiar they are with the equipment and what they need to do, the better off they will be.
    Do you have a code team that responds also?
    We are also tested every year as part of our compentency as to what's on the arrest carts, use of equipment and the role of the RN participating in a code. Hope this helps, good luck.
  4. by   Barbara Rose
    Being a long term care nurse who was ACLS certified was very fustrating for me. So, from someone who knows, have then take turns checking the crash cart - I mean checking! have them put the blades on the scope, have them change the bulbs, batteries, and handle the equipment, have them inventory the drugs, and know where they are located (and how to "put them together"), have them take the ekg course, have them test the defib. and actually push the buttons, show them where to put the pads, etc, etc. It is the only way they will ever know how everything works. In ltc, you have a back board, a suction machine, an oral airway if you are lucky, and O2. That's about it, I wanted more but cost prevented any additional equipment. All LTC facilities should have defibulators just like first responders do in the community and should be trained to use them. But I guess that is a dream of mine that won't be happening soon.
  5. by   frustratedRN
    i think all of these are excellent ideas. i have never been a part of a code although i go see them when i can so at least i will have some idea of whats expected and what happens.
    i wish they did this at our hospital.
  6. by   tonchitoRN
    How come ACLS is not required of hospital employees. Especially with working with the elderly codes are a fact of life in a hospital. Perhaps post a course that is available and maybe some of the employees will volunteer to take it.
  7. by   booklady
    I'm an ICU nurse , also nurse educator and Staff Development Experience. We had the same problem. Mock codes and more mock codes. Very important to be supportive and friendly, most lesser experienced nurses are already feeling very uncomfortable, etc. We also introduced an ACLS Prep Course that covered all the same material, but had no testing involed, was very relaxed, played games,etc. Ton's of nurses that were intimidated to take ACLS started coming to those classes, and most eventually completed ACLS. Get support from administration for the cost of education by collecting data on you codes related to delays in providing CPR, etc.
  8. by   debbyed
    I would also suggest that you allow one staff member at a time to observe codes in the ER. Check with the Nurse Manager of the ER, it shouldn't be a problem for your staff to observe as long as they say out of the way.
  9. by   jltaylor
    [I was looking through posts and liked your idea about scavenger hunts of the crash cart. We need something different to peak interest around here. Could you tell me a little more about how you are going to go about this. I would appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    QUOTE=woo 2]this is my first post so i,m hoping for a positive reply.
    we recently hired several nurses who have come from long term care and have very limited code experiance, which was a major problem when we had our first code and i was the only old nurse there. I should also say that I work on a med surg floor. so how can we help educate these nurses, we are planning a mock code, which we will video and use for all new hires as part of their orientation, also planning a scavenger hunt of the code cart so they can quickly locate et tube , laryngoscope, know how to apply quick patches and other leads but what else could we do? PLEASE HELP, this is a real concern and I need help ASAP.
    thank you all for all you help, also I would love to get in the chat room and chit chat just tell me what time is the best to log on.[/QUOTE]
  10. by   bobnurse
    Lots of mock codes, make them as realistic as possible.......We have a manikin that we set up that can receive drugs, intubations, and defib.......So when we have a mock code, its as real as possible.......The nurses give the drugs (expired drugs are kept by pharmacy). They defib the manikin.......They intubate, if they cant we have a combitube. We also conduct monthly ACLS refresher classes for nurses to attend. Its all about getting the reps in........How you practice is how you perform....Im an ACLS instructor, and in one class, it amazed me that a nurse didnt know what color lidocaine was, nor has she ever opened up one........She worked med surg and a code team always arrived........
  11. by   PJMommy
    Quote from debbyed
    I would also suggest that you allow one staff member at a time to observe codes in the ER. Check with the Nurse Manager of the ER, it shouldn't be a problem for your staff to observe as long as they say out of the way.
    I agree with this idea. This was how I learned as a new nurse...going to codes throughout the hospital and completing ACLS as soon as possible. My first code, I was a spectator. For my second, I did compressions. When my third code occurred (my pt at the time), I felt fairly comfortable with what needed to be done and where to find stuff.

    The ideas for mock codes are great and I wish we did them....but still, nothing will substitute for the experience of being there and watching or participating in a code in progress.

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code help