Co-worker hitting up the Dr.s for meds during shift? - page 6

The other day, a new nurse in our dept. (well-baby nursery) came to work sick (elevated temp and sore throat). The charge nurse wouldn't tell her to go home (didn't want to hurt her feelings... Read More

  1. by   funkymutha999
    Unfortunately , calling in sick is a no no in this profession. It is riduculous. I have called in sick with pneumonia and have been told to wear a mask and to check my lifestyle. I am a nurse that is 52 years old.This is the coldest profession in the world. No wonder thereJL is a nurse shortage. Unless you work where there is a union, you have no rights. I never suggest this profession to any young people. Its a great part time job. Thats it! JL
  2. by   wonderbee
    I work in a teaching facility critical care unit. Private docs are a rarity. Our Rx pads are locked up and only the clinical director can get to them. Solves that problem. Still, I see nothing wrong with the practice if there is a professional relationship established and everyone's on the same page. No narcs of couse.

    Ever heard the saying a nurse can't have a bad day? Well, so what's a nurse to do? Let's see. Can't get sick. Can't get well! Can't eat a sandwich in the clinical area but can't take a lunch break either. Hydrating is also a no-no... for 12 hours!! Peeing is allowed x1. I say get the damned script!
    Last edit by wonderbee on Sep 13, '06
  3. by   mamason
    Where I worked, you were not given a break if you were sick. I worked cardiac. Our nurse manager stated that she didn't care if we were sick we needed to be there. OK...so let's cough and sneeze around post op open heart pts!!!! Needless to say, I don't work there anymore.
  4. by   Dadyzangel86
    I think that it is very dangerous for someone to be working with children while they are sick. Especially those that are venilators or fighting for their lives. I feel that from a professional standpoint, this nurse should have just called the head nurse and told her that she was feeling a little under the weather and that it would be best if she did not come into work that day! This is my opinion. Good Luck!!
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Dangerous to be working when you're sick anyway, since you never know who may have a compromised immune system.
  6. by   banditrn
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    Ever heard the saying a nurse can't have a bad day? Well, so what's a nurse to do? Let's see. Can't get sick. Can't get well! Can't eat a sandwich in the clinical area but can't take a lunch break either. Hydrating is also a no-no... for 12 hours!! Peeing is allowed x1. I say get the damned script!
    :wink2: :wink2: I remember having shifts where my only break would be to go pee!! It always felt so good to actually get to sit down for a minute!!
  7. by   bollweevil
    Years ago, we all routinely asked the interns and residents for help with antibiotics, for example. We got to know them quite well and I guess they felt comfortable doing it. And we used to visit our attendings if we needed help in their area of expertise. They all gave a lower price to us, called it professional courtesy.

    As I got older, I grew embarrassed to discuss my personal health with people I worked with because they love to use it against you and the culture has changed, it seems, so that it isn't as easy to ask a doctor at work for prescriptions, unless you know them long-term and have a really good relationship with them. I think it puts them in rather an awkward spot to ask them and I don't want to jeopardize my relationships or my job so I haven't asked any favors for a very long time. If one is going to ask a doctor for help, it should be done very privately. No one else should know about it.

    As for a sick nurse coming to work - is there anyone here who has never done that? Or who would never do that? I guess if it's to work with sick babies or the fragile elderly or the chronically, fragile ill, one could wear a mask. But realistically speaking, how many of us really call off for just a cold? Or allergic sinusitis? Or even bronchitis? If we feel able AT All to get to work, don't we go to work? I have been trained that, unless I am absolutely knocking at death's door, I go to work. I almost never, never, never call off for any reason. That's just the way I've been trained over the last 50 years.

    And there are plenty of times that I have gotten sick from someone at work - a sick patient, visitor, or colleague- be they docs, nurses, whoever. It's a germy world and if we gave in to every sickness, we'd never be at work. So, hi ho, hi ho, it's off to work we go. As for the morality of it, I think it's bad to give our illnesses to each other but what can you realistically do?
  8. by   dreamjob25
    I have had physicians to ask me to perform "non-nursing" tasks for them, such as calling in food orders, getting drinks from the cafeteria, etc. Our facility sent a memo to all staff that we were not to request prescriptions or test requisitions from our physicians. Well it might take 5 seconds for a script for some pyridium and some macrodantin for a uti. It might take me 15 minutes to stand in line and pay for his cold drink in the cafeteria line.
  9. by   loriangel14
    My own doc works where I do so I can ask her if I need a script for something.She has done the same for some coworkers.
  10. by   Lynnette1990
    i'd deffinetly be more concerned that she is around newborns and sick but that is just me.
  11. by   bollweevil
    Quote from dreamjob25
    I have had physicians to ask me to perform "non-nursing" tasks for them, such as calling in food orders, getting drinks from the cafeteria, etc. Our facility sent a memo to all staff that we were not to request prescriptions or test requisitions from our physicians. Well it might take 5 seconds for a script for some pyridium and some macrodantin for a uti. It might take me 15 minutes to stand in line and pay for his cold drink in the cafeteria line.
    Well, in that case, ask real quietly and privately for the script, I'd say. Knowing the possible consequences.

    Or tell the docs "no go" when they ask for your favors and tell them why.

    Or get Admin to settle the whole dang issue. Of course, docs will still ask for favors. No win here. Why doesn't Admin get smart and issue a memo to the doctors ordering them to not ask nurses to do non-nursing stuff for favors for them. Or, really smart, why doesn't Admin send cold drinks and some snacks, sandwiches around to all of you once in a while? Like every time you can't leave for lunch, get mandated to stay over, etc.
  12. by   bollweevil
    Quote from dreamjob25
    I have had physicians to ask me to perform "non-nursing" tasks for them, such as calling in food orders, getting drinks from the cafeteria, etc. Our facility sent a memo to all staff that we were not to request prescriptions or test requisitions from our physicians. Well it might take 5 seconds for a script for some pyridium and some macrodantin for a uti. It might take me 15 minutes to stand in line and pay for his cold drink in the cafeteria line.
    Do you do it? Why? Why not? This is the old handmaiden/secretary/servant mentality. Unless you're truly collegial and you have each other's backs and no one minds a genuine give and take.
  13. by   KLKRN
    I used to routinely go to work sick, but over the years I noticed that it's others coming in sick that often starts me on one of my bouts of bronchitis, so now I don't go in if I feel sick.

    As for hitting a doc up for a script, I can call my own MD's office to call in a Rx for my frequent sinus infections (yes, it's been worked up and I do visit in person regularly) and if I've just seen him in the past few months, he'll call it in.

    I have never asked a doc I work with to give me anything. And I've never had a doc ask me to run and get him anything, either. In fact, one doc went back to their lounge and got ME a Diet Coke a few weeks ago because I couldn't go on break to get one.
    Last edit by KLKRN on Apr 18, '08

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