Co-worker hitting up the Dr.s for meds during shift? - page 4

The other day, a new nurse in our dept. (well-baby nursery) came to work sick (elevated temp and sore throat). The charge nurse wouldn't tell her to go home (didn't want to hurt her feelings... Read More

  1. by   kalayaan
    professional courtesy would be great. as long as youre not bothering a doctor, such as in asking something so trivial or asking him while hes busy with rounds, then i dont see why not. a simple ailment that can be remedied at work can take out unecessary absences. in fact, it would be better for the hospital to provide such feature in their system. like an employee clinic, one that employees can go to prior to a shift in case they feel sick. this will ensure that each that all types of employees go to work healthy, as you know, infection can be so easily transmitted.

    im sure there are some doctors that also do informal consults with their colleagues. one might just think that they dont want consults from us bec, u know, were just nurses.

    but the feverish nurse is a different story. she should not have gone to work without a doctors permission as she was in the well baby unit.
  2. by   ortess1971
    Ironically, this happened to me today. I have pinkeye(lucky me!) and since I am orienting and we've been short staffed, I went in. I think I was in a little bit of denial too(thought it was allergies. Turns out a coworker had it last week.) They took one look at my eye and told me to go home. One of the docs overheard and offered to write me a prescription for drops but they ended up sending me to employee health and they gave it to me free.
  3. by   traumaRUs
    I worked for 10 years in a big ER. In the beginning, docs did write scripts as professional courtesy. However, in the last five years, it is now policy to not write scripts and both MD and employee are subject to disciplinary measures.

    There is sound reasoning behind this: once a script is written, that establishes a doctor/patient relationship. This is not something our MD's wanted or needed.

    I am now finding as an APN in outpatient dialysis that I am hit up daily for scripts for UTI's, flu, n/v/d, etc., plus hypertension med refills, etc.. I don't want to refuse, but have so far because its just not safe practice.

    IL is one of the highest litigation states and I don't need my name on the list.
  4. by   flashpoint
    At the hospital I worked at, it was very much against the rules to ask for a "hallway consult." The biggest reason is the paper trail...there is no place for the doctor to document that he wrote you a script, there is no assessment, no history, and no $$$ for the doctor. It also puts the doctor in an awkward position if it is something he doesn't want to do...not fair to them. It can distract the doctor from what he is supposed to be doing...teh one I worked for said it bothered him because he would be thinking about another patient and then a nurse came up and started asking him about something else, and he would forget what he was doing before.

    It still happens once in a while though...when I had West Nile, one of the doctors heard me throwing up and offered to give me some phenergan supps...I declined, but called my doctor the next day and he wrote the script for me. I used to see a lot of staff hitting doctors up for refills...not a big deal but again, no documentation...and if they tell someone the see in the hall they will call something in and they forget, the nurses catch it when the patient finally calls the office!
  5. by   MultipurposeRN
    Quote from TazziRN
    I worked at one place where if someone called in sick and the shift was already short, staffing would tell that person they HAD to come in. One nurse was puking and pooping and was told to come in anyway.....she spent most of her shift in the bathroom.

    Where I am now, there was a house supe who would ask what was wrong. Most times people answered automatically, then she would say "Why can't you work with that?"
    That's why when I call in sick, I don't ASK...I TELL them, " I am sick, I won't be in today!" Don't give them the option and I would have told them, no, I am not coming in because I'll be spending all day in the bathroom!
    It does burn me that nurses are not allowed the same privileges of being ill like the nonmedical person is.
  6. by   twinmommy+2
    If it were me I wouldn't come to a well baby or any other nursery sick. We tell family members all the time not to come to the hospital to see newborns when they are sick, same applys don't it?
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Don't give them the option and I would have told them, no, I am not coming in because I'll be spending all day in the bathroom!
    I dare work to ask me why i won't be in, because i'll get graphic. Chunks, color, smell, burning, TP and trashcan usage, i won't care.
  8. by   nuangel1
    i agree a nures with temp and in well baby should not go in .but there is pressure to work even when sick .it has happened to me .it bothers me alot that just because we are nurses we are not allowed to be sick .(and by sick i mean really sick).few yrs ago i worked in er .i had to call out 3 days in a row because i am asthmatic couldn't breathe was having freq asthma attacks and running fever >102 i had seen my dr was on meds and using inhalers i had bronchitis i had to speak with my boss each time and on the 3 rd day i called out she told me over the phone and i qoute" i think its time you find another job".i gave my 3wks notice and i left .when i went back to work she only spoke to me 1 x before my last day.she knew she had been wrong .
    Last edit by nuangel1 on Sep 6, '06
  9. by   dijaqrn
    Was this new nurse on probation and afraid to call off sick? Had her health insurance kicked in yet?
  10. by   catlady
    Tell me that doctors don't write scripts for their relatives, friends, and each other.
  11. by   Spidey's mom
    We also have a policy against it so that the docs don't have to worry about being approached at the nurse's station or in the hallway.

    However, I have been told by a few of the docs to please come to them if I need something for my kids and I recently did do a "hallway consult" about my 5 year old with his doctor.

    I think it truly depends for the docs - if they like and respect you they probably have no problem with it as long as it doesn't interfere with them rounding in the morning.

    One time I was in Sacramento at a conference and had taken my son and mother-in-law with me (so I didn't have to leave my son behind). My mil watched him during the day while I was at the conf. Anyway, he got an ear infection, high fever, etc. I called one of our docs and she called an RX to a local pharmacy for me because she trusted my judgment.

    Just a few weeks ago after getting back from Vietnam, I was out of my seizure meds and I called a doc here and he called 9 tabs into a pharmacy in the LA area for me so I could get home and refill it locally.

    I'm not sure there can be a hard and fast rule when the docs themselves choose to do it.

    steph
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    The bottom line:

    Know policies first.

    Know your doctors.

    I am among those who do not believe doctors OWE me a professional courtesy. But I know some of my doctors well enough to feel "ok" with asking for non-narcotic meds in the case where seeing my PCM will take a while (and take me out of work, possibly). But that is where I am.

    Know your policies. Know your docs/NPs.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    The bottom line:

    Know policies first.

    Know your doctors.

    I am among those who do not believe doctors OWE me a professional courtesy. But I know some of my doctors well enough to feel "ok" with asking for non-narcotic meds in the case where seeing my PCM will take a while (and take me out of work, possibly). But that is where I am.

    Know your policies. Know your docs/NPs.
    I agree that docs do NOT owe us a professional courtesy.

    steph

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