Co-worker hitting up the Dr.s for meds during shift? - page 2

The other day, a new nurse in our dept. (well-baby nursery) came to work sick (elevated temp and sore throat). The charge nurse wouldn't tell her to go home (didn't want to hurt her feelings... Read More

  1. by   RobCPhT
    I would have to agree with the other posters on this one. Depending on how well you know the doc most of them won't mind helping you out. I have went to the floor really sick a few times and gotten scripts for antibiotics when an office appointment wasn't convenient. If the doc is okay with it why does it matter?
  2. by   Blee O'Myacin
    When I needed my mortgage, I applied like everyone else. I think that it is a matter of professional behavior.

    That being said, I think that if something came up while I was at work (like an allergy attack or hives or something), I would ask one of the docs or tell the nurse supervisor and go to the ER. But I would never come to work sick to get meds.

    Blee
  3. by   babiesX2
    I've seen it done in the ER, and the Dr.'s there don't seem to mind. True, some will say no, but the majority help out. The floor at our hospital is completely different. The only nurse I saw asking for meds was written up repeatedly for it.

    The nurse I posted about has been at our hospital for less than a week. I didn't want her asking the rounding pedi for a throat exam and antibiotics because she shouldn't have been in the nursery with her symptoms. When our unit director came in (after I had told her she shouldn't ask the pedi), she told UD that she was going to ask the rounding OB to look at her throat and write a Rx. Our UD said, "You're asking him to look at the wrong end!" That was pretty funny. Our UD told her to clock out and go down to the ER.

    I wanted to see what other opinions were on this. I thought it was inappropriate and so did our UD, but the other nurse I was working with thought it was OK. I guess it depends on the culture at a particular facility.
  4. by   Dianne6
    Quote from babiesX2
    The other day, a new nurse in our dept. (well-baby nursery) came to work sick (elevated temp and sore throat). The charge nurse wouldn't tell her to go home (didn't want to hurt her feelings ). She said she was going to ask the Dr. to give her a Rx when she made rounds. I thought this was inappropriate, and I told her so. Our unit director came in later in the morning and sent her home.

    Am I the only one who feels it is unprofessional to come to work sick and then hit up the docs for an exam and some meds?
    She shouldn't have come in sick , but i think that if the doc and nurse know each other well and have a good relationship.. why not
  5. by   TazziRN
    Our ER docs will write scripts for us if they are not for narcotics. Some will even do a quick exam under the table. The doc I worked with today did just that for my daughter, who pulled a muscle while running cross country and needed a note for her coach to not run for a while. I see no problem with this as long as both parties are willing and the meds are non narcotic, and the hospital is not being abused. If the doc had thought my daughter needed films, I would have signed her in. I have been at work when my PMD walked through and I've asked him for scripts. Other employees do this also when their PMD's walk through.
  6. by   Multicollinearity
    Years ago when I worked in an ER, one of the docs gave me an Rx for antibiotics. I had worked with him for quite a while and we were just quite comfortable with each other. I don't think it should be common to ask docs though. It does seem inappropriate unless both parties know each other well and there is no duress. In a perfect world we would all see our own docs or check into the ER. But of course we aren't in a perfect world.

    Of course in the ER, if an employee checks in - it's just more work with less staff.
  7. by   nuangel1
    i think it depends on the nurse and md involved if there is a rapport and the md is amenable then i don't see the problem (unless it was chronically done ,narcotics etc) but rare time or 2 i do not have issue with what would concern me more was whether she was working febrile or thought to be contagious the thats different and she should have been sent home immediately.who knows why she didn't call out maybe she didn't have the sick time ,maybe she worried it would leave the unit short like i said who know.i don't think it is a fireable offense if both parties are amenable .i also agree with nene and tazzi this is done frequently in er as professional courtesy the re doc may take quick look at nurse or family member then if films or treatment required then they are registered .i have done it on a rare occassion in my er a pt had gotten sick the unit was sprayed with deoderizer however i am asthmatic and fragrance sensitive i started having a asthma attack while working tried to get better with my albuterol but it didn't when it got worse i asked to be seen by ed dr he did i got tx registered and ended up going home .
  8. by   rach_nc_03
    I've been offered an rx before when i got really sick at work with what turned out to be a nasty sinus infection. when i left for work that morning, i thought I was just really tired, but it got worse throughout the day and i ended up needing to go home. One of the neurologists with whom I had a good rapport (which was unusual, as I was still a CNA, and most docs treated me like I was invisible) offered to write for some abx. I felt so crappy that I couldn't imagine going to the pharmacy on the way home, so I thanked him and declined the offer.

    like another poster said, what really bothers me is when people show up to work sick. I just started working in a corporate job as a nurse consultant, and this company has a very strict policy about going in to work sick. You have an extended illness bank that kicks in after your 2nd day out so you don't use up all your PTO. I find it so ironic that this place where people just sit in cubicles all day is more concerned about sick employees spreading infection than the hospitals where I've worked.

    I know it's a very different set of circumstances- you can't really work as a bedside nurse from home with your laptop- but it makes me so angry that hospitals staff so poorly that employees are guilted into working when they absolutely should NOT be around patients. Of course, you also see the people (not just nurses, but all sorts) who think they're being a martyr by showing up sick. :uhoh21: Come on, people! You're putting EVERYONE at risk, and it just irks the snot out of me.
  9. by   canoehead
    Asking the docs for scripts is common practice where I work but I completely disagree with it. I don't believe they owe a "professional courtesy" to anyone who is unable to reciprocate, and as nurses we can't do that. I've also seen how often our ER docs get asked by staff to look at a rash or a bump, or sore throat, usually several times a day. I think it is unreasonable to expect that from them.

    Think about how often the patients of a physician assume he/she wouldn't mind if they got some special priviledge like phoned-in scripts without an exam for instance. We are just the same- everyone thinks they are the special one. I suggest that unles you see someone outside work socially you shouldn't expect free services from them.

    JMHO
  10. by   Sandi0302
    I have asked a Dr for an RX when I worked in the ER. The doc's were great and didnt mind.
    I think the big question is...why are you EXPECTED to come in to work sick? Dont tell me no one else has felt the pressure to come in sick. I think it is rediculous that nurses should be expected to tend to the healthcare needs of others when, if we are sick, should be tending to our own.
  11. by   TazziRN
    Quote from Sandi0302
    I think the big question is...why are you EXPECTED to come in to work sick? Dont tell me no one else has felt the pressure to come in sick. I think it is rediculous that nurses should be expected to tend to the healthcare needs of others when, if we are sick, should be tending to our own.
    I worked at one place where if someone called in sick and the shift was already short, staffing would tell that person they HAD to come in. One nurse was puking and pooping and was told to come in anyway.....she spent most of her shift in the bathroom.

    Where I am now, there was a house supe who would ask what was wrong. Most times people answered automatically, then she would say "Why can't you work with that?"
  12. by   fgoff
    I too have seen this done. In the ER & on med/surg floors. It never use to bother me. Now I wonder where the paper trail is? The assessment & Dx that is required to be documented proir to treatment.. Couldn't the lack this get a MD (&/or hospital) in ... even when done with good intentions????
  13. by   banditrn
    Quote from TazziRN
    I worked at one place where if someone called in sick and the shift was already short, staffing would tell that person they HAD to come in. One nurse was puking and pooping and was told to come in anyway.....she spent most of her shift in the bathroom.

    Where I am now, there was a house supe who would ask what was wrong. Most times people answered automatically, then she would say "Why can't you work with that?"
    Tazzi - been there, seen that!!:uhoh21: A co-worker called me to work for her one time - she had diarrhea, and the supervisor told her to put on a Depends and come to work.

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