CNN article on nurses and job growth - page 3

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CNN Money published several nursing articles this morning regarding the job shortage for new grads based on information they got from allnurses members. FULL ARTICLE: For nursing jobs, new grads need not apply... Read More


  1. 5
    I've worked as an aide in an ICU for almost 2 years, and I'm 5 months away from graduating an accelerated RN school. I've got more clinical experience than most ADN programs have. I keep getting told to "apply early" in an attempt to secure a job prior to graduation.

    I'm being rejected within the same day of applying. My applications aren't even being taken seriously, despite my excelling in a difficult program AND having worked in a critical care area for some time now.

    I have no problem going for my BSN later (or sooner), but I have things that need paid for prior to continuing my education, and yet, it isn't looking promising that I'll be getting hired 'early,' if at all.
    nursel56, Nightingallow, tewdles, and 2 others like this.
  2. 2
    Quote from Multicollinearity
    I am so sorry new grads are still going through this.

    When I graduated in 2009, the economy had just tanked, and not many of my classmates got jobs in our large urban area. I am glad I wasted no time and moved to an undesirable rural area in order to start my career. There are opportunities out there for new grads - but many of them seem to be in undesirable places. Makes me think of a remote, rural tribal hospital I know of that is only hiring BSN grads with at least one year of experience - the market has gotten that fussy.
    Between student loans and paying bills, I would move to anywhere just to get a job and pay my bills.
    sweetnurse786 and Esme12 like this.
  3. 6
    I liked Haley's idea, If hospitals do not want to spend the time and money training new grads, then maybe nursing school should change to accommodate the needs of the hospital so they will be more willing to hire them.

    Makes sens, you can fulfill the state requirement for nursing and spend more time preparing for how you will actually work in the real world.

    How do we keep this story trending on CNN?

    CareQueen, sapphire18, SummitRN, and 3 others like this.
  4. 8
    What is wierd is I think that some of the general public thinks that new nurses who can't find jobs are holding out for high salaries. What a laugh I had when I read that. One post said new grads were holding out for 6 figure salaries as to why new grads are having trouble finding employment.

    Also that new grads should take the lower bottom of the barrel jobs at a hospital and work up to a nursing job. There is another one that shows the confusion. Hey, A new grad nursing job at a hosptial is the bottom of the barrel! I think the other poster thought for example: get a job as a janitor and if you do good maybe they'll let you be an RN one day. LOL.
    not.done.yet, sapphire18, Esme12, and 5 others like this.
  5. 3
    This article, for the most part, is wonderfully written and I like how the author brought to light that it is a very competitive world for new grads, considering the limitation on job opportunities. The only thing I question is the numbers and the percentage (43%) that they use.

    I would also like to point out, even though most schools are out for money, I believe some are there for the welfare of the student. At least, I can say for the Arizona area. When I did the research when deciding which nursing school I would like to attend, the schools did boast about how there is a need for nurses because of the Baby Boomer generation, however, they also did highly recommend that I start putting in volunteer experience, get certifications (CPR, etc...), and join groups like NSNA to make myself stand out on a resume since they did say, that one of the biggest challenges for new grads is obtaining that first job.

    On that note, I attend a for-profit school as we speak and despite their reputation (not the school in particular, but the overall stereotype that surrounds for-profit schools), they have supported their students 100% by giving their students a resource for references (to use on their resumes), clinical teachers help hunt for new jobs and pass on that information to the student body, resume help, and a Capstone program. Not to mention, they always communicate openly with the student body. This type of support has resulted in positive feedback. The 1st graduating class (August 2012) had an 100% passing rate on NCLEX and 80% (8 out of 10 students) have already gotten jobs. The second graduating class (December 2012) already had students being offered jobs.

    My point is, that true, in some areas, it is very hard to find a nursing job and the hospitals should be more open minded and less strict about allowing new grads the opportunity to work for them. Not to mention, make the investment in new grads, as I believe most new grads have quite the capability to be awesome nurses, for they were given knowledge in school, now they just need to be oriented(trained) with the right skill set and experience to expand that.

    I am optimistic because of my experience thus far. I am so sorry to hear others out there struggling and I hope my little ray of positive light will give you the willpower to keep on trying and searching for that nursing job you worked so hard to achieve.

    Best of luck!
    CareQueen, Esme12, and Nightingallow like this.
  6. 3
    Quote from netglow
    What is wierd is I think that some of the general public thinks that new nurses who can't find jobs are holding out for high salaries. What a laugh I had when I read that. One post said new grads were holding out for 6 figure salaries as to why new grads are having trouble finding employment.

    Also that new grads should take the lower bottom of the barrel jobs at a hospital and work up to a nursing job. There is another one that shows the confusion. Hey, A new grad nursing job at a hosptial is the bottom of the barrel! I think the other poster thought for example: get a job as a janitor and if you do good maybe they'll let you be an RN one day. LOL.

    6 figure salary I scoff at the idea!

    I am a new grad RN I demand at the very least a 7 figure salary, stock options, and 3 months paid vacation!!! Nothing less will suffice!

    Janitor with an RN license, well things could be worse. I ran into an old high school classmate working at my brothers elementary school working as a Substitute Janitor.
    sapphire18, Esme12, and DizzyLizzyNurse like this.
  7. 1
    Hey I know some people out there aren't going to like this, but if you're struggling, I think it's a pretty good idea. I myself joined the Army National Guard in 2007 and it's been the best decision I've ever made. I'm not a nurse, but here's some of what the Army in particular can offer you:

    If you already have your RN, you can apply to the Army's Nurse Corps. It's really not a bad deal and you're pretty much going to sit around in a hospital just like any other job. The main difference being you're going to wear ACU colored scrubs and you'll have to show up to PT every morning. I know there's a lot of people who say bad things about how rough the military was for them but honestly it's never been that bad for me. I'm pretty good at doing what I'm told though, and I'm not big on arguing for the sake of arguing. Anyways, here's some of the options.

    ACTIVE NURSE CORPS PROGRAM

    ARMY NURSE CANDIDATE PROGRAM

    This program is open to undergraduate students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from an accredited nursing program. It provides:
    • A $5,000 bonus when you begin the program, plus a $5,000 bonus at graduation
    • A monthly stipend of $1,000 during the months you are enrolled in a full-time Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education– or National League for Nursing– accredited nursing program

    Eligibility requirements:
    • Bachelor of Science degree must be completed within 6 to 24 months Passage of the NCLEX-RN examination is necessary prior to commissioning as an Army Nurse Corps officer U.S. citizenship
    • Prior enlisted Army Soldiers must have completed all mandatory service obligations and have less than 10 years active federal service at time of commissioning



    RESERVE NURSE CORPS PROGRAMS

    SPECIALIZED TRAINING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    This program is open to associate degree/diploma nurses currently enrolled in an accredited Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Recipients receive a monthly stipend of more than $1,900.

    Participants incur a one-year obligation to serve in the Army Reserve
    for each six months or less of financial assistance.
    Esme12 likes this.
  8. 3
    James, you bring up a great point but just recently the Army Nurse corp just changed their requirements so they don't accept new grads either. In addition to a BSN and license, they want you to have 6 months of RN work experience. I contacted them to get a packet going but this is what they told me via email and over the phone. I haven't looked into any of their undergrad programs though since I'm close to graduation. Do you have a specific link for the information you pasted?

    I believe Air Force and Navy still accept new grads.

    Quote from James.Trott
    Hey I know some people out there aren't going to like this, but if you're struggling, I think it's a pretty good idea. I myself joined the Army National Guard in 2007 and it's been the best decision I've ever made. I'm not a nurse, but here's some of what the Army in particular can offer you:

    If you already have your RN, you can apply to the Army's Nurse Corps. It's really not a bad deal and you're pretty much going to sit around in a hospital just like any other job. The main difference being you're going to wear ACU colored scrubs and you'll have to show up to PT every morning. I know there's a lot of people who say bad things about how rough the military was for them but honestly it's never been that bad for me. I'm pretty good at doing what I'm told though, and I'm not big on arguing for the sake of arguing. Anyways, here's some of the options.

    ACTIVE NURSE CORPS PROGRAM

    ARMY NURSE CANDIDATE PROGRAM

    This program is open to undergraduate students pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from an accredited nursing program. It provides:
    • A monthly stipend of $1,000 during the months you are enrolled in a full-time Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education– or National League for Nursing– accredited nursing program
    Eligibility requirements:
    • Prior enlisted Army Soldiers must have completed all mandatory service obligations and have less than 10 years active federal service at time of commissioning


    RESERVE NURSE CORPS PROGRAMS

    SPECIALIZED TRAINING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    This program is open to associate degree/diploma nurses currently enrolled in an accredited Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Recipients receive a monthly stipend of more than $1,900.

    Participants incur a one-year obligation to serve in the Army Reserve
    for each six months or less of financial assistance.
    Nightingallow, tewdles, and tokidoki7 like this.
  9. 4
    Quote from kalevra

    How do we keep this story trending on CNN?

    Add you comments to the conversation about the article






    You can also send an email to the reporter and let her know your thoughts.

    annalyn.kurtz@turner.com

    In any of your messages, please mention you are a member of allnurses. United we stand!!
    Esme12, brian, Nightingallow, and 1 other like this.
  10. 0
    This article is great. I am not really a new grad because I graduated in December of 2010, however, it took me 10 months to get a mediocre job as a nurse in a retirement facility. The job pays well, and I am part time and eligible to go full time, however, I had to go back to school for my BSN d/t all the hospitals in the surrounding areas ONLY accepted bachelors program degrees and at least a year experience. Talk about the frustration. I definitely know how that goes. All I can say is hope and pray, and if you have to complete a job that is out of the ordinary, just try to get anything and everything. The economy sucks, as we all know, but sometimes you have to take what you can get. Keep the faith new grads! We all will get our dream jobs someday soon! I promise!


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