Cna

  1. I currently work the midnight shift as a CNA in a LTC facility. I don't have the best of backs (due to a good case of scoliosis) and beginning to have back pain from constantly lifting and transferring residents. Please don't take this thread as a complaint (because it is not), I love working with the residents...I would just like a little less back pain. I use proper body mechanics but still always am in pain at the end of my shift. I am thinking about applying at a hospital, but I am not sure if it would be better, worse or the same as far as my back is concerned. I am curious if anyone out there can tell me what duties a CNA would perform in a hospital.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   Alnamvet
    Quote from NurseChelleBell
    I currently work the midnight shift as a CNA in a LTC facility. I don't have the best of backs (due to a good case of scoliosis) and beginning to have back pain from constantly lifting and transferring residents. Please don't take this thread as a complaint (because it is not), I love working with the residents...I would just like a little less back pain. I use proper body mechanics but still always am in pain at the end of my shift. I am thinking about applying at a hospital, but I am not sure if it would be better, worse or the same as far as my back is concerned. I am curious if anyone out there can tell me what duties a CNA would perform in a hospital.
    The answer to your question is clearly stated by your state nursing board....if you cannot perform the clearly outlined duties and skills of a cna, than I suggest another career, where your "assistance", as needed, would not entail that which you initially agreed to perform as a cna, which you now find to be an issue.
  4. by   Love4Me
    Your response...somewhat offended me...and I hope I do not offend you now. I can and due perform my duties as they were outlined to me when I accepted the job. I have had many of the charge nurses compliment me by telling me that I am one of the best CNAs at our facility. I currently only work 2 days a week (because I believe that is my back's limit) and the RNs are begging me to pick up more shifts because..."we need more CNA's like you". I did not post here to be told that I can not perform my job. I am simply inquiring as to the duties of a CNA in the hospital. Wondering if it is physically more, less, or about the same amount of work. However, thank you for your help.
  5. by   LPN-n-2005
    Speaking from experience, I think you would like the hospital a whole lot better. One advantage of working in a hospital is there is a lot more able body people who are able to get in and out of bed on their own instead of being confined to the bed. I have worked both LTC and hospital and I never want to go back to a LTC. I enjoy the age differences I work with. We get a few nursing home residents but every week I come in there is new faces and personality types and the lifting is not quite as bad. I highly encourage you to apply to a hospital. good luck.
  6. by   P_RN
    I've developed a disabling back injury. All the "good body mechanics" in the world don't help if you are doing things that could be done safer and simpler by using equipment and techniques that are proven to work. Sometimes it is as simple as having sufficient help....but the employer either doesn't or won't provide help or equipment necessary. I was a contributor to a collection of nurses' stories compiled in a publication Back Injury Among Healthcare Workers.

    After 30 years of nursing and 22 of that in orthopaedics I realized I didn't know most of the information that is in it. I am not advertising or promoting anything. I have been "thrown away" by my profession....I don't want you to go through that. Check out the site Work Injured Nurses Group....

    http://www.wingusa.org

    Protect your body, it's all you have and they can't replace backs yet. But as a NM once said New Nurses are a dime a dozen.

    P
  7. by   JacelRN
    Hello NurseChellebelle,

    I wanted to answer your question about the responsibilites of a CNA in the hospital. My experience is in several areas as a CNA. I worked on an orthopedic floor, as a tech in the ED and as an aide on a dialysis/urology floor. I can tell you that the orthopedic floor was very heavy and required much "back" work. The ED was much easier considering back work because of more assistance from the squads and more responsibilities elsewhere like EKG's, blood draws, transporting and stocking. The urology floor was like that described by LPN n 2005. We have a variety of patients who can need just a urinal handed to them or be fully assisted in a bed bath. But with this, there is additional help when needed.

    As far as skills go, I was responsible for BS, VS, I & O's, baths, transfers, ambulation, toileting, d/c'ing heplocks and foleys, and when applicable doing basic dressing changes. Overall, I feel I learned more on my urology floor as a CNA than orthopedic.

    My advice would be NOT to work on an orthopedic floor in the hospital, but more of a specialized floor where they have more skills to perform. You will still be able to take care of the patients without killing your back and be more apt to learn skills.

    God Bless,
    JacelRN
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I don't AS much lifting that i did in a nursing home, but i also have more help than i did in the nursing home. It all depends on a facility as to how much lifting you'd do.
  9. by   1OldDinosaurRN
    what about nursery? i know there'd be some lifting, but hopefully (for the new mom:chuckle ) nothing over 9 to 10 lbs. talk with your employer. do you have adequate help with turns, lifts, etc? do you have access to equipment that will help take the load off your back? at my facility, each employee is screened through physical therapy and the therapist recommends exercises, job modifications if any, etc. typically, our acute care cna's do basic patient care, no treatments, etc. however, we do get a lot of total care type patients from the nursing home and ltc adjacent to our acute care. the key is to be sure you have adequate assistance in doing your duties.

    p.s. i'd hate to see what would have been said about my profound hearing loss and my job as an rn. geesh! :uhoh21: talk about being mean to each other. i have not posted much, but have read alot in here and i am astounded at the amount of negativity and just plain meanness i've seen. no wonder there's a nursing shortage out there. take care of you--there's only one of you. hope you find the job that's right for you.
    cathy
  10. by   Tweety
    Depends on the unit, in neuro there is a lot of lifting, in some med-surg units like mine there is a lot of lifting and turning (we have a lot of trachs and totals). People in hospitals are sicker than they used to be.

    Perhaps a place like mother-baby, and nursery would be a great idea!

    Good luck. Pain is a sign of something wrong. You don't want to be in chronic pain years from now, it's not worth it. Find something you enjoy and aren't in so much pain and do it soon. Best wishes.
  11. by   ktwlpn
    I don't think anyone is being "mean-just realistic...Nursing and working as a cna both usually involve lifting and moving heavy objects.There are a few areas to try to get into that don't and that is what the OP wants to know-many have been mentioned.However you just never know when you may be called on to lift someone quickly.(isn't it kind of like saying 'I want to be a long distance truck driver-but I can't drive?")
  12. by   cwiseman
    reply to back injuries
    Quote from P_RN
    I've developed a disabling back injury. All the "good body mechanics" in the world don't help if you are doing things that could be done safer and simpler by using equipment and techniques that are proven to work. Sometimes it is as simple as having sufficient help....but the employer either doesn't or won't provide help or equipment necessary. I was a contributor to a collection of nurses' stories compiled in a publication Back Injury Among Healthcare Workers.

    After 30 years of nursing and 22 of that in orthopaedics I realized I didn't know most of the information that is in it. I am not advertising or promoting anything. I have been "thrown away" by my profession....I don't want you to go through that. Check out the site Work Injured Nurses Group....

    http://www.wingusa.org

    Protect your body, it's all you have and they can't replace backs yet. But as a NM once said New Nurses are a dime a dozen.

    P
    What we need is a national nursing union of all healthcare workers. We have a lot of clout and power but we are afraid to use it. It is time that we start protecting our own backs, because if we wait for employers to protect us we will wait forever. We need to demand better working conditions and if our demands aren't met we need to strike. Let the employers worry about staffing their hospitals with untrained people while we strike, I bet you the strike wont last very long. Where are the nursing leaders ?
  13. by   cwiseman
    reply to back injuries
    Quote from P_RN
    I've developed a disabling back injury. All the "good body mechanics" in the world don't help if you are doing things that could be done safer and simpler by using equipment and techniques that are proven to work. Sometimes it is as simple as having sufficient help....but the employer either doesn't or won't provide help or equipment necessary. I was a contributor to a collection of nurses' stories compiled in a publication Back Injury Among Healthcare Workers.

    After 30 years of nursing and 22 of that in orthopaedics I realized I didn't know most of the information that is in it. I am not advertising or promoting anything. I have been "thrown away" by my profession....I don't want you to go through that. Check out the site Work Injured Nurses Group....

    http://www.wingusa.org

    Protect your body, it's all you have and they can't replace backs yet. But as a NM once said New Nurses are a dime a dozen.

    P
    What we need is a national nursing union of all healthcare workers. We have a lot of clout and power but we are afraid to use it. It is time that we start protecting our own backs, because if we wait for employers to protect us we will wait forever. We need to demand better working conditions and if our demands aren't met we need to strike. Let the employers worry about staffing their hospitals with untrained people while we strike, I bet you the strike wont last very long. Where are the nursing leaders ? :angryfire

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