Changes

  1. Okay so what has worked??? Here are some ideas I have:
    1. Union(not sure if that's good or bad though)
    2. Nursing research on the effects of high patient ratios
    3. Not letting doctors speak to us in a demeaning manner (stand up for yourself and don't allow it. Nip it in the bud right away)
    4. writing to ANA describing the conditions at work
    5. writing to newspapers getting our profession out there (editorials, etc.)
    6. Nurses who got out due to bad conditions could write to the media to explain what is going on in healthcare and the crises going on
    7. stop eating our young!!!!!

    That's for starters. Agreements? Disagreements? Ideas? I think some of these ideas would at least improve the perception of our profession.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   3651bht
    Trn Maybe you could be one of the first people nurse to write to your local newspaper and don't forget to sign your name. Also seems you have done your fair share of complaining. If you have the guts to speak-up to a doc then speak-up to that nurse who is eating the young. You go girl. Put your money where your mouth is!!!!!
  4. by   TRN
    To 3651bht.......I want this to be a positive topic. No negativity, etc. Please, let's not cut each other down under this "changes" topic. No sarcasm, nothing. I have done some things already. I have stopped MD's who were rude and nurses also. Let's keep this topic positive. Thank you. I am not here to defend myself or argue with anyone. Now back to the topic......what changes have you tried that failed or worked?
  5. by   Nancy1
    TRN, I know you want to keep this positive, so this is a question for you. Do you really think that going to the press as an individual is going to make things better? It always seems to me that the press will take it's own perspective and use it to their own advantage. They might also go to the facility for the management perspective which could possibly make it look bad for those you are trying to help.
    I wish you luck. I am fortunate enough to be an ADON in a LTC facility that has enough staff at this point in time. We are worried about the future and are preparing.
  6. by   TRN
    Nancy nurse.....good idea. No, I'm not really sure what works. I am a junior nursing student, so I'll need experience in the field to learn more. I thought maybe the editorial section might be a start. I am new to this, and I'm sure I will make many mistakes. I'm just tired of hearing the public put our profession down and call us bedpan wipers. Everyone I told I was studying to be a nurse told me I was making a mistake. They just don't truly understand what nurses do. I thought maybe some letters to educate the public how our roles have changed would be a start. I sent one in but haven't seen it yet in the paper yet. I am shocked to hear how the ANA doesn't seem to be much help. How sad.
  7. by   Mijourney
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by TRN:
    Okay so what has worked??? Here are some ideas I have:
    1. Union(not sure if that's good or bad though)
    2. Nursing research on the effects of high patient ratios
    3. Not letting doctors speak to us in a demeaning manner (stand up for yourself and don't allow it. Nip it in the bud right away)
    4. writing to ANA describing the conditions at work
    5. writing to newspapers getting our profession out there (editorials, etc.)
    6. Nurses who got out due to bad conditions could write to the media to explain what is going on in healthcare and the crises going on
    7. stop eating our young!!!!!

    That's for starters. Agreements? Disagreements? Ideas? I think some of these ideas would at least improve the perception of our profession.
    [/QUOTE
    ---------------------------------------------
    Hi,
    I feel that nurses, especially those new to the profession, should focus on patient advocacy in the following ways:

    1. Learn and demonstrate great people skills.
    2. Regularly take continuing education courses outside of your facility to expand your health and medical knowledge in patient care.
    3. Regularly read health and medical material outside of the nursing profession.
    4. Join a professional group inside and outside of nursing.
    5. Come to work in a compassionate, positive, and especially professional mode. This will make you more objective and discerning in dealing with your cirmcumstances.
    6. Be willing to be excluded from the "in crowd" for the sake of yourself and your patients. This does not mean that you have to behave in a stand offish manner.
    7. Realize that it will take strong patience to earn respect in the mist of storm. Develop expertise in what you do, and coupled with a compassionate, positive, professional spirit, you will have that respect you want in the long run.
    8. Understand that you may find that although you like the concept of nursing, you may find the reality of it unnerving.
    9. Decide what your personal goals are and shoot for them. You'll be able to tolerate your current circumstances better, or you'll have the courage to leave for something that looks better.


  8. by   3651bht
    Trn No negativety implied. Positive feedback on my part. Show me the goods and I'll be satisfied. Letters to your Congressman or Senator, perhaps. Remember actions speak louder than words. And the web has freer speech than the USA. If you can't stand the heat get out of the kitchen...
  9. by   bunky
    OK TRN, I have been doing a lot of thinking on this issue. What about the State Boards of nursing? They are the one's who are supposed to be protecting the public from us, so why do they turn their backs on all of us, nurses and patients alike while this insane staffing goes on? What about THAT avenue?
  10. by   lita1857
    I'm impressed...bunky, are you a night nurse or just up at all hours? Mijourney...nicely put..well organized,well thought out. TRN....I truly hope you keep that fire in your belly...you and nurses like you will be our next frontier, let's see if you can make some headway-I think you can.I'm resting right now, my head hurts from hitting it sooo many times on the brick wall. Hopefully I'll get a second wind.
  11. by   JillR
    I agree that standing up to doctors and Nurses that eat their young is a start. I had once mentioned to my supervisor about an unsafe pt/nursse ratio at our hospital and she asked "What would you do if you worked somewhere that had worse ratios?" My reply was....."Iwouldn't work there" I meant it and she knows it. It's a miricle but our ratios are now better for the most part. There are still days that things get crazy, no one can predict how many admissions there will be on any given shift, but it's better. Go to the person who can make some changes. In my opinion administration is in no position to ignore our requests at this time. Now is the time to insist on changes. I have to tell you that I work for a union shop so they cannot fire me for no reason. If management doesnt know how unhappy you are, or if they think they can run a facility without nurses, let them try.
  12. by   TRN
    Great ideas! I'm going to print and save them for when I finally become a nurse. I still can't figure out if unions are good or bad. I know the AMA is going to become unionized soon, if not already. Is anyone here an active member in the ANA?
  13. by   BJRN76
    Well I can speak a little bit about unions since in my four years as a nurse I have always worked at unionized hospitals. I personally would not work at a hospital that was not unionized. I feel that hospital administration is pressured to make money at any cost and since nursing is one of the largest "costs" to a hospital we are often the sacrificial lamb. You need to have nurses united and focused to protect themselves and thier patients. I have found that unions will do this. Now I am aware that there are bad parts to unions but for the most part they are benificial. I know that I will probably get some strong disagreement to this but this is what nursing is coming to. I also encourage any nurses out there not to cross nursing picket lines. Hospitals will offer thousands of dollars a week to nurses to come and work during a strike and I am amazed at the number of nurses who are willing to cross the lines. We are in a fight for our profession and if we are going to have a chance at winning then we have to unite. Enough said
  14. by   goldilocksrn
    I think before you head on out into the world to make changes, you must first get good nursing skills and be confident in your judgment. The reason I say this is that when you start making waves at the facility you are employed, you are drawing negative attention to yourself and don't want to give administration any reason to get rid of you. When I went to anyone and everyone I could think of at my hospital to discuss my patient care fears, I was labeled "too negative" and was said to be helping to "bring down the morale of the unit". What they forgot to mention was that our morale was already low, and I was only voicing out loud what we all thought. You need evidence that you are a strong nurse that is compassionate with patients and family. When my manager reviewed my performance profile, she fould not one negative word. In fact, there were files of letters from patient families thanking me for my good work. That is where you start. Then you can firmly say when confronted, "This is about my patients, not me."

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