Can you believe this? - page 5

I understand the push for "customer satisfaction" but I think that the following situation is taking it too far. A few days ago we had a patient on the floor who was in constant pain. She had MS... Read More

  1. by   Robinette
    This is pretty funny! I'm wondering if this patient didn't have some connections in high places that caused the supervisor to "hop and fetch". Bizarre, eh?
  2. by   teeituptom
    Im a simple ole country boy

    dear pt

    1. I am not going to find you ciggies, that is your responsibilty

    2 if you want to go out and smoke go for it, you have that right, just do it yourself I aint gonna help you in this at the least

    3 if your family and friends wont help you maybe they have a reson for not doing so, I wont undermind them

    respectfully

    kiss my grits


    dear supervisor

    if you want to buy ciggies for a pt I will sell them to you

    50 dollars a ciggie, cash in advance


    respectfully

    kiss my grits
  3. by   NotReady4PrimeTime
    our patients, for the most part, are unlikely to be smokers (except perhaps our teenaged mvc/multitrauma/attempted-suicide/etoh-od patients). thus far i've never been asked to enable a patient to go out for a cig. but...big but ... i have been asked by one of our illustrious attendings to take patients outside for entertainment. these would be long-term, critical patients who are intubated and ventilated, on ms infusions at huge doses (>100 mcg/kg/hr), with arterial lines to monitor their multiple vasoactive infusions, who may or may not be on crrt. ***** once i asked him if my professional association would support me if i did as he asked, and the patient crumped "while we were out". the look on his face told me that idea had never even occurred to him, and that he didn't think it bore worrying about.

    my philosophy: if you need icu, you don't go for walks in the park!!
  4. by   nialloh
    My hospital is no smoking. We do not supply cigs or assist with smoking. On admit it is documented that the pt is informed of the no smoking status, and that they can get patches as needed.
    That aside, we had a pt that was a royal PIA. She was constantly yelling and screaming at staff to let her smoke (she was a tele pt, and we didn't have remote tele yet). Her Dr came in and heard her carry on, so after lecturing her about nurses being professionals and how not to treat them, he discharged her on the spot and sent her home.
    It was a very happy day for us, and that Dr made a lot of friends that day.
  5. by   realmean1
    One word says it all. This thread reminds of a long ago RN, who turned down a terminal pt.'s morphine drip 'cause "She can get addicted to it" Proably the same type nurses who lecture pt.s, who have terminal lung CA and still smoke. Duh, alittle late now to quit don't you think? Hospitals don't give alcoholics drinks? Maybe not, but, are mighty free with the Ativan, Xanax and so forth so they get a chem. buzz and then get hooked on the drugs and the etoh. I don't agree with ICU pts smoking. But, on a general floor, you have wasted an hour or more trying to convince someone of your beliefs, etc, while they could have gone, had a cig. and come back and in a lot better state of mind than getting more upset listening to why they can't, shouldn't and so on. Have not met a smoker yet that did not know that smoking was BAD for them. Jeez, your non-smokers and reformed smokers (who are the worst) remind us every freaking minute of every day. If I am in pain, sometimes a cig helps more than the pain meds. If I can't sleep, a cig helps me to relax. Instead of lying in a stange bed with all the loud noises going on, waiting for the lecturing non smoking nurse to get off his/her 15 min (read-30-45 min.) break or finish looking at the Avon or 3-4 scrub catalogs, to give me a pill that I know will not be effective for 30-45 min or a shot 15-30 mins (IM) I could have been outside, smoked, back in room, in bed, in less than 15 min. Give me a frigging break. Now, before you all start with the flames, self rightous, indiginant replies. I smoke, I am an RN, I have worked every area in a hospital that has nurses. EVERY Area. Has anyone ever picked up my pts when I went out for a cig.? NO! I have been a nurse since we autoclaved bedpans and urinals, used glass IV bottles w/ time tape, cleaned our own needles and so on. Have seen every kind of pt there is to see and have come to the conclusion that we as nurses are our own worst nightmare. Enuff said!!!!!!!!
  6. by   pieWACKet
    the "House" should be reported for putting other patients at risk. Certainly in California, where patient ratios have recently been mandated, the removal of a staff member for such a request would never have been accomodated, placing the hospital at risk for abbrogation of patient ratio as established by law. No wonder you were PO'd. What a bunch of crap.
    I'm wondering if you can write a letter signed by the staff members present expressing what sort of pressure this placed on all staff as a result of the loss of one staff member during the period [including the MD who DIDN't Want this to occur] . the risk allowed via the changed patient ratio, and professional staff disappointment in, and concern for, the decisions made by "the house" as you call it, putting all professionals at jeapordy.
    If its a group letter, no one person has to stand out too strongly.
  7. by   JWaldron
    Quote from duckboy20
    Do use ativan and librium alot but for whatever course of treatment the patient is in for I see some physicians find it easier to prescribe the beer. Seems to be on patients who are not going to be in as long
    It's getting a little off the original topic, but I have more than once had patients who had an order for a glass of wine with their dinner tray, or later in the evening. We kept it locked in the Med refrigerator. It never had anything to do with detox, just 'the amenities of home' while in the hospital!

    Savvy One
  8. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from JWaldron
    It's getting a little off the original topic, but I have more than once had patients who had an order for a glass of wine with their dinner tray, or later in the evening. We kept it locked in the Med refrigerator. It never had anything to do with detox, just 'the amenities of home' while in the hospital!

    Savvy One
    Good lord, what else did that facility do for patients---leave mints on the pillow??
  9. by   nanseatx
    I absolutely cannot imagine such a situation. In no uncertain terms, I would have told the nursing supervisor that if she wanted this patient to engage in action that is detrimental to her health, she could assist her in it, I would not. Often patients in my ER ask for the same priviledge, but I tell them that unless they are capable of assisting themselves or have a family member present, it just isn't an option. I don't help my drug addicts get cocaine nor do I buy alcohol for my alcoholics.
  10. by   teeituptom
    sounds about right
  11. by   Nurse Ratched
    Quote from realmean1
    I don't agree with ICU pts smoking. But, on a general floor, you have wasted an hour or more trying to convince someone of your beliefs, etc, while they could have gone, had a cig. and come back and in a lot better state of mind than getting more upset listening to why they can't, shouldn't and so on.
    I don't lecture about the evils of smoking. I figure if you don't know by now, you've probably been living under a rock for the past thirty years. I don't mind if you smoke, but I won't take a patient out who can't go on their own. And if you're well enough as a hospital patient to go on your own to smoke, then you are well enough to be discharged. That's certainly the way insurance companies see it.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Hope the wine was a good year.


    Jeez lol.
  13. by   teeituptom
    I dont know about wine at all

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