Can Someone Be a Nurse Without Jean Watson?? - page 7

Ok now, as I delve back INTO nursing philosophy and theories, I come across, again, the theories of Jean Watson that have been hailed as the greatest thing since polyurethane IV bags - The Caring... Read More

  1. by   live4today
    Susy k said:

    "Maybe I am having a DOH moment, but I couldn't follow you Renee."


    Renee replies:

    You will one day, Susy k......that's IF you ever become a Mom.

    Susy k said:

    "I don't think you can compare motherhood to a professional nurse, and even if there are similarities, I'm not sure I want them compared. I am not a mom and I have no desire to be one at this point."[/b]

    Renee replies:

    Yes, a mother most certainly can compare the life-long career of motherhood with ANY profession......INCLUDING nursing. However....you won't understand this until you become a mom yourself.

    No sweat! Carry on.........
  2. by   rebelwaclause
    OK but really...How often do we use some of the theory we have learned, other than policy, guideline and clinical treatment "how-to" when we practice nursing? I can't even say on an administrative nursing level it is used.
  3. by   hpyrn
    I dont know i once had a patient that had molested his step daughter and when about to be arrested shot himself in the stomach so he could come to the hospital instead, i rather enjoyed in a sick kind of way changing that bandage and hearing him moan in pain, opps didnt i give you that pain med before i did this-hmm i really meant to!!! But for the most part i think a certain kind of person becomes a nurse, most of us figure it out without any one writing it in a book and the ones that dont find a different way to use their education. nuff said
  4. by   rncountry
    Jim, absolutely fantastic article! After the first couple paragraphs I thought about when I was a nursing student just before graduation. There was a lecture by a guest speaker that we all had to attend, our regular lectures were over, clinicals were over, but we could not graduate unless we went to this last lecture. I settled in expecting some wonderful knowledge from a PhD nurse, instead we got a lecture on how to fluff aura's. I literally was holding my sweater over my mouth trying to stifle my laughter because I was afraid that I would not graduate if anyone knew how hard I was laughing. It did not help that my friends on either side of me were practicing fluffing my aura while listening to the lecture. I absolutely could not believe that anyone thought this was relevent to what we would be doing in real life. Or that anyone believed this woman could see aura's. We were told anyone could develop the ability and what colors meant what illness and then how to move the hands in order to help heal that illness. Alrighty then!
    I have patients I don't even like, let alone care for like my family. I do however care about how I perform my job, and care about whether I do it well.
    Suzy I hope you write something that means something to real nursing. I look forward to reading it. If anyone can do it, you can.
  5. by   Q.
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer
    Yes, a mother most certainly can compare the life-long career of motherhood with ANY profession......INCLUDING nursing. However....you won't understand this until you become a mom yourself.

    No sweat! Carry on.........
    Well then you've proven my point. Nursing tries so hard to make itself distinct from any other medical/scientific/health care profession, when really, we carry qualities that are no different than any other profession.

    And as a nurse, I can care just as much about my job as a computer programmer about a major project.

    That's why Watson's theory bugs me.
  6. by   live4today
    I don't know about proving any points, Susy.....I really never try to get into competitive point proving. I only speak what I have lived already,,,,,or live now.....and I view a profession as something that a person works hard to attain whether or not someone else takes pride in the work of that one individual.

    I have many professions in my fifty year old life. One is motherhood (3 daughter ages: 26...28...32.....and a 17 year old stepson).

    A profession.......TO ME......comes about in the way one approaches what they set out to do. Supposedly, our country was founded on Free Enterprise...which I believe in wholeheartedly. So to define a theory for each person's passion that becomes their "profession" in life.......is really an individual thing.......IMHPO.

    Nighty night! It's late here in TX......for this granny......so taking my NON-theoretical self to beddy bye! Sweet dreams everyone, and may you all have a great start to your work week. :kiss
  7. by   Q.
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer
    I don't know about proving any points, Susy.....I really never try to get into competitive point proving.
    It wasn't really a competition, Renee. It was just a discussion about the usefulness of Watson's theory, and perhaps about having any theory of nursing at all, and about the reasoning behind nursing theories. I was only using your comment about nursing being compared to motherhood as evidence that perhaps nursing shouldn't try so hard to separate itself. That's all.
  8. by   WashYaHands
    Watson is the only nursing theorist to explicitly support the concept of soul and to emphasize the spiritual dimension of human existance. (Spiritual meaning what gives a person inner strength during times of stress, not necessarily religion). This may be what turns nurses off, or turns nurses on about her theory. I've never heard of fluffing auras, but she does advocate treating the whole person (body, mind, spirit) during illness/disease state.

    Linda
  9. by   Stargazer
    O/T: So, Helen--do you have to fluff your aura manually, like a pillow, or can you just throw it in the dryer with a sheet of fabric softener so it smells springtime-fresh too?
  10. by   Jenny P
    Originally posted by Stargazer
    O/T: So, Helen--do you have to fluff your aura manually, like a pillow, or can you just throw it in the dryer with a sheet of fabric softener so it smells springtime-fresh too?
    Stargazer, you crack me up! LOL! :roll :chuckle

    SusyK, I have never heard of Jean Watson or Martha Rogers, and am glad I went through Nursing school before either of these people ever got published! I remember Hildegard Peplau and Virginia Henderson, and feel those 2 First Ladies of 20th Century Nursing were on to something with their Nursing Theories-- and they didn't say Word One about caratas, auras, infinite energy fields, etc. They stuck with basic real life nursing ideas and skills. IMHO, they dealt with real people, real patients, and real nursing. I'm not sure WHAT planet some of these other people are from, but they certainly aren't doing REAL nursing here on Earth!!!! Thanks for the interesting info-- and also the wacky ideas!!!!
  11. by   kaycee
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K
    [B]

    .

    And as a nurse, I can care just as much about my job as a computer programmer about a major project.

    I 've been a nurse for 27yrs and I've never heard of Jean Watson or Martha Rogers either. I do remember nursing theory in school was the most boring part. I do remember being constantly told throughout my career that money shouldn't matter because nursing is a caring profession. We were even discouraged from discussing salaries with each other because money isn't what nursing is about. Well maybe that is why nursing is in the shape it's in.
    I totally agree with what Susy K is saying above and in other posts. How you care for patients is an individual thing and doesn't have to be layed out in a book on Nursing Theory. There are many pt's that instead of fluffing their pillows I wanted to put them over their heads. I still gave them quality care because that's me, even if I couldn't stand them.

    I think what I always hated about nursing theory was it wasn't the real world. I always figured the people that wrote them, never actually took care of pts.
    Less emphasis on theory and more on clinical will make a better nurse IMHO.
  12. by   semstr
    Sorry Linda (Washyhands), but there is a famous European, Swiss theorist, her name is Liliane Juchli and she is a nun too.
    Now her theory is based on spirituality and caring too.
    I once went to a lecture of her and I must say, she was awsome! This woman truly lives what she writes, very believable, but......... for a "normal" woman like I am, very hard to understand and even harder to practice.

    This thread is getting better by the day!! Renee





    sorry, forgot the word better for the thread. I don't want to start on religion again, but with "normal woman" I meant myself a believer/ nonbeliever, depending how life goes
    Last edit by semstr on Sep 16, '02
  13. by   WashYaHands
    Sorry Linda (Washyhands), but there is a famous European, Swiss theorist, her name is Liliane Juchli and she is a nun too.
    True. There are many theorists who have based their work on the concept of caring. Jean Watson's theory of Human Science and Human Care was first published in 1985. Many posters have said that they've never heard of her, so I was trying to provide some insight into what the theory is about. If my posts seem like I'm trying to pursuade people, I apologize, as that is not my intention. I'm trying to provide knowledge about her theory in an attempt to stimulate the discussion and add balance to the topic.
    I realize that theory (in any subject) is boring. And, in the big scheme of things, probably means nothing. But, the topic came up and since I've studied it ad nauseum (armed with tylenol and coffee), it seemed like a thread I could contribute to.

    Linda

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