Can Someone Be a Nurse Without Jean Watson?? - page 30

Ok now, as I delve back INTO nursing philosophy and theories, I come across, again, the theories of Jean Watson that have been hailed as the greatest thing since polyurethane IV bags - The Caring... Read More

  1. by   yankeesrule
    Glad to see I am not alone not knowing who Jean Watson is/was? Where I work I can see how a person can treat a patient to their fullest abilities and not have an emotional attachemt to the person. Working with people who some can do nothing for themselves but grind their teeth it happens. I dont feel it makes one a bad person. I feel its just the way things go. On the other hand I can see people caring beyond what would seem a professional relationship and may impair their judgement of reasonable thinking.
  2. by   rrrn
    [font='times new roman'][font='times new roman'] watson's caring theory, like most grand theories are broad and abstract and do not easily lend themselves to application or testing. in contrast, narrow range theories are very precise and restricted in their focus. mid-range theories go some way to solving this problem. they are moderately abstract and inclusive but are composed of concepts and propositions that are measurable.
    [font='times new roman'][font='times new roman']
    [font='times new roman'][font='times new roman']as nurses we need to care for our patients from a nursing perspective and the medical model, after all we do have to follow physician orders, or as i prefer to call it the physician plan of care. in doing so we need to look holistically at the patient when intervening. according to watson, nursing is to perpetuate caring, healing, and health wherever and whenever patients are threatened biologically, institutionally, environmentally or politically, by local, national or global influences (sounds like most patients). in doing so the we need to consider the person’s mental, physical, societal, and spiritual environment when caring for them. if you can measure those outcomes with watson or any other theorist great. but i don't think that's possible.
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    [font='times new roman']you don't need watson, rogers, or peplau to be a nurse, but you do need to understand nursing concepts and why they work. otherwise you limit your practice to being a mindless task master blindly following physician's orders.
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  3. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from rrrn
    [font='times new roman']
    [font='times new roman']you don't need watson, rogers, or peplau to be a nurse, but you do need to understand nursing concepts and why they work. otherwise you limit your practice to being a mindless task master blindly following physician's orders.
    [font='times new roman']
    [font='times new roman']
    i take exception to this comment. we are all spiritual beings and bring our own spiritual values into our practice. i don't need some hoaky 60's- drug-culture hippy pseudo-religion being handed down by ivory towered elitists to bring something more to my care than being a "mindless task master".

    the problem with theory is you cannot qualify it. and since we are all spiritually unique, it doesn't matter if you could: it still wouldn't apply to any but a fraction of the nurses in practice.

    i said this in another tread: "there is an argument that theory is so encompassing that you can pick and choose the elements that appeal to you to become a better nurse.

    but why should that be limited to nursing theory? i do pick the spiritual elements that apply to my life and in turn to my practice. i just don't use nursing theory as my primary or even as a substantial source. my spiritual contributions to nursing are based on my whole range of experiences. to the extent that nursing theory coincides with my beliefs, it is because they are repetitions of concepts i've found and learned elsewhere.

    that being the case, what is so special about nursing theory? many if not the majority of nurses that are very good nurses discovered the same things that nursing theory can provide outside of nursing theory. therefore, nursing theory is neither foundational nor especially unique to the development of the spiritual tools that can allow someone to become a good nurse.

    if the vast majority of nurses can arm themselves with the spiritual tools to become good nurses independent of nursing theory, then what is the purpose of spending so much time and energy trying to develop a rationale of care that only principally duplicates such efforts?"

    by spending our time trying to teach religion instead of science, we have been left behind by our peers because we practice in a science-driven field. that's why we aren't treated as professionals.

    ~faith,
    timothy.
  4. by   rima
    Quote from karenelizabeth
    Ok I trained in the UK

    so

    Who is Jean Watson ?
    I'm a new comer to the forum. I am not sure this forum still works and people visit it.

    Dear "karenelizabeth" could you please answer: where in UK you studied?
    I'm from Moldova (Easten Europe)? I'd like to study nursing in UK. Maybe you could give me an advice. Thank you in advance.

    Last edit by sirI on Sep 11, '06 : Reason: edit email
  5. by   Elisheva
    Jean Watson? I thought maybe you meant a fragrance, like Jean Nate.

    Never heard of her.
  6. by   Elisheva
    Oh, and here's my theory. Good nursing practice means knowing when to attach and when to detach and both can come from a caring place. Too close, you can't see the forest for the trees. Too far away, can't do any good.

    For me, it's simple: I ask myself "how would I want to be treated or how would I want someone I loved to be treated in this situation." Simple theory for a busy nurse.
  7. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Quote from Elisheva
    For me, it's simple: I ask myself "how would I want to be treated or how would I want someone I loved to be treated in this situation." Simple theory for a busy nurse.
    Not only is your 'theory' a wonderful working model, it benefits from not having it handed down from on high by ivory tower elitists more interested in controlling nursing then defining it.

    Great theory. I use it myself. And, I didn't need Jean Watson to dictate to me the spritual parameters of this wonderfully concise theory.

    Nursing theory should stick to science and let its practitioners deal with the spirituality that EACH of us bring to the profession, as individuals. In fact, I argue that it is both a fundamental impossibility to define that individual spirituality for the masses of nurses AND the very process of doing so does more to diminish the 'professional' nature of nurses then any other factor.

    Thanks to 'nursing theory', we are relegated to power diminishing language and devices. We can't say what we mean, because we would violate the limits placed on us by the Ivory Tower, limits in turn that were placed on us in the very old days, when doctors taught nurses how to be nurses and instituted these very same disempowering devices.

    So, we hint at what we mean so that it is other health care professionals that can 'Ah Ha' the solutions and take the credit for what nurses do as professionals everyday.

    Can you be a good nurse without Jean Watson: if you really really try, you can be a good nurse DESPITE Jean Watson.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  8. by   Tweety
    Timothy there are many different theories being taught. I don't recall the nursing professing banding together and forcing any one theory down anyone's throat.

    I personally don't subscribe to any one theory. However, being of an inquisitive and scientific mind, I can understand the desire of some folks to define "what is it nurses do?".

    Of course there's alway the standby "all nurses do is pass meds and do assessments and paperwork". Perhaps we should leave it at that without forcing students to read any Irovy tower theory.

    So, we hint at what we mean so that it is other health care professionals that can 'Ah Ha' the solutions and take the credit for what nurses do as professionals everyday.
    Not sure what you're saying here.
    Last edit by Tweety on Sep 8, '06
  9. by   elcue
    I think one of the ethical mandates of nursing is to care FOR every patient as if you cared ABOUT them. That is to say, we have all certainly been assigned to care for an unlikable patient here and there, but as professionals we still provide proper care.
    A poster above feels that all nurses care about people, and I agree with that. None of us could do this if we didn't care about people in general.
  10. by   elcue
    Timothy, I like the way you think!
  11. by   PANurseRN1
    I don't need any nursing theorist to tell me what my common sense tells me.
  12. by   jojotoo
    I'd rather have a superbly skillful nurse that didn't give a d--n about me than a touchy feely airhead that acted like my best friend.
  13. by   MrsMommaRN
    as a nurse i beleive you should treat each patient with unconditional positive reguard. you don't need to love each person as you would your family, but care about providing competent care while advocating for your patient

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