Can new grads get a 7a-3p shift? - page 5

Hi guys! I was thinking about nursing school, but I am also concerned about those night shifts. As a new nurse, would I realistically be able to get a 7a- to 3p shift so I could be home at night?... Read More

  1. by   dhornor
    I work the night shift and have been in the ER for 10 years. In our ER new grads have taken the last 5-6 day positions. The reason?? There are no politics on the night shift. As far as I'm concerned...the new grads can take the day abuse. I refuse to.
  2. by   Lee RN EMT-P
    Quote from RN4NICU
    :yeahthat:

    Just say NO to crazy schedules like this!
    The only way hospitals get away with it is by finding nurses who will give in to it. If no one will do it, they have to do regular scheduling (pick a shift and stick with it.) However, as long as they find people who are willing to put up with their crap, they will keep shoveling it.

    Sorry, a bit off topic.

    Continue

    As long as we say OK they will work us to death, we realy need to learn how to stand up for ourself's..
  3. by   JimT
    It has never made sense to me that we allow a new grad to work the night shift, much less send them there as some sort of right of passage. Think about it - your least prepared, least experienced nurse taking care of patients during the time of day when they have the least amount of support when things go wrong?

    I think our model has been wrong since I got out of school 20 years ago. New grads should start on days, rotate to 3-11 once they are well oriented and can display some basic level of competency and don't go to 11-7 until they have at least a year or two of experience.

    I also think that the idea of permanent shifts as a reward for longevity is a problem. Everyone rotates to all shifts and the pay diff for the unattractive shifts is what soothes the wound, so to speak.

    Nursing is a commitment to provide care to our fellow man. It is a calling, not a career opportunity. That isn't to say that it isn't a great career. We just need to remember why we wanted to be nurses in the first place.
  4. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from JimT
    It has never made sense to me that we allow a new grad to work the night shift, much less send them there as some sort of right of passage. Think about it - your least prepared, least experienced nurse taking care of patients during the time of day when they have the least amount of support when things go wrong?

    I think our model has been wrong since I got out of school 20 years ago. New grads should start on days, rotate to 3-11 once they are well oriented and can display some basic level of competency and don't go to 11-7 until they have at least a year or two of experience.

    I also think that the idea of permanent shifts as a reward for longevity is a problem. Everyone rotates to all shifts and the pay diff for the unattractive shifts is what soothes the wound, so to speak.

    Nursing is a commitment to provide care to our fellow man. It is a calling, not a career opportunity. That isn't to say that it isn't a great career. We just need to remember why we wanted to be nurses in the first place.
    I disagree. I, for one, would not rotate shifts under ANY circumstances. It is unhealthy and I would leave nursing forever before I would accept this "wound" which NO amount of pay diff would "soothe".

    Nursing is my career. It is NOT the central focus of my life and rotating shifts (and other ridiculous scheduling nightmares) totally disrespects the fact that I have a life that does NOT revolve (literally) around my job.
  5. by   JVanRN
    Quote from JimT
    It has never made sense to me that we allow a new grad to work the night shift, much less send them there as some sort of right of passage. Think about it - your least prepared, least experienced nurse taking care of patients during the time of day when they have the least amount of support when things go wrong?

    I think our model has been wrong since I got out of school 20 years ago. New grads should start on days, rotate to 3-11 once they are well oriented and can display some basic level of competency and don't go to 11-7 until they have at least a year or two of experience.

    I also think that the idea of permanent shifts as a reward for longevity is a problem. Everyone rotates to all shifts and the pay diff for the unattractive shifts is what soothes the wound, so to speak.

    Nursing is a commitment to provide care to our fellow man. It is a calling, not a career opportunity. That isn't to say that it isn't a great career. We just need to remember why we wanted to be nurses in the first place.
    I sort of see your logic about day shift having the most support and so forth. This sounds good in theory but in practice it would not work. I think they should get a pretty good orientation on day shift as to see what it is like and work a little of all the shifts (during orientation period when they are not supposed to count as staff) but having days as the starting off point would not work. Night shift is very inconvenient to many people and I think it would piss off alot of senior nurses if they were made to work night shift to accomadate new grads. Don't get me wrong there are many nurses that work nights and have no desire to work days, but alot of people I know on day shift have "earned" their way there by working all the crappy shifts and night shift is often seen as the crappy shift (bacause of the hours)

    I say this as a new grad that works night shift. On my unit most of the nurses that work days have been working at the hospital forever and that is just how it works where I am. But we also have some really great nurses on night shift too that like it just fine so it balances out with us. This is not the case will all places, I know.

    And I'm sorry but I was not beckoned by a higher power to become a nurse so I'm not going to put my body through the wringer by working inconsistant crazy hours (flipflopping to day shift and night shift). I'll rotate to 3-11 occasionally to help but that's about it. And nursing is a career opportunity to me. I'm lucky that I find my job to be very satisfying and do find meaning in it but I'm also looking at the pay/working conditions and benes too.

    But in short (or long) I do think it is a good idea for new nurses to have exposure to all the shifts during orientation. The only thing that scares me are the places that have a disproportionate amount of inexperienced nurses on one shift. I dont think nurses get sent to nights because of a rite of passage, but often that is where the greatest need is. And when a day position comes open a senior nurse on another shift often gets "bumped up" But I guess I'm just lucky where I work. And really if a new nurse needs a day shift they can be found...one does not have to automatically work nights because they are new...but at some places it is just like that.
    Last edit by JVanRN on Mar 6, '05
  6. by   Tweety
    Quote from JimT
    Nursing is a commitment to provide care to our fellow man. It is a calling, not a career opportunity. That isn't to say that it isn't a great career. We just need to remember why we wanted to be nurses in the first place.
    What if one wanted to be a nurse for a career, not a calling? There are a lot of nurses who disagree with the "nursing is a calling" concept.
  7. by   RNKPCE
    I think it is good to ask these questions before you get into nursing school. Never say never. When I graduated 15 years ago I assumed I would be working Night shift. I didn't want to work evenings as I was a newly married boy was I shocked when all they had available on the floor I was interested in was day shift. I hadn't even considered that it would be an option. Since then there have been many other new grads hired onto days. Some of our night shift staff likes it and don't want to leave. I did days til I had kids and have now been working part time evenings. I don't miss the hectic pace of days. Days is like a rate race from the minute you get out of report til you leave. Evening starts off fast pace but gradually winds down over the course of the night. Except for the patients that have sun-downers.

    Back to the the "Princess Alert". Here is an example: each fall we rate the holidays we want off on a 1-5 scale 1 being top holiday off. The holidays are Thanksgiving, Xmas eve, Xmas day, NY eve, and NY day. So obviously you pick the holiday you want off most and give it a 1 and the one you don't really care about a 5. This one nurse was shocked when she only got her first 2 choices off and she is fairly new. She told us I put a "1" for all of them, I wanted them all off...........We stood there looking like we were catching flies. We told her that if anyone would get them all off it would go by seniority. Even our most senior nurse had to work 2 holidays.

    So just realize if you end up going to nursing school, you might find your self working night shift on holidays.

    But there are many opportunities out there, more than in other professions.
  8. by   lisamilgrim
    Well i just got out of nursing school in DEC. I started out working a combination of 3-11 and 11-7 in a nursing home. This is as an Lpn not an RN though. From what i have seen it is very hard to get a 7-3 shift, not impossible though. Most 7-3 I have seen available are in Doc's offices and for alot less pay. Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
  9. by   FrumDoula
    Quote from JimT
    Nursing is a commitment to provide care to our fellow man. It is a calling, not a career opportunity. That isn't to say that it isn't a great career. We just need to remember why we wanted to be nurses in the first place.
    While I can see SOME of your points, I cannot agree with this. Part of the reason I'm becoming a nurse is to help support my family. If I wanted to do it with good feelings and crummy wages I would go to a minimum wage job at Baskin Robbins. (No offense to the fast food employees out there, ok?)

    Why is it that I usually hear the "it's a calling, not a career" chorus sung toward traditionally female dominated careers? (Teaching, nursing, etc.) I never hear lawyers or NBA players singing that little ditty.

    This line is usually used to justify paying cruddy wages, too. Because if it's a calling, then you're a selfish idiot for wanting to actually be COMPENSATED for working your butt off. Which is a lovely way to keep wage costs down.

    I hear this even as a doula. That we should all volunteer our services because it's a calling. Sorry, gotta pay for groceries and the overpriced mortgage, too! And I have a valuable skill that helps people tremendously. If I have to rely on someones' altruism to give me good bedside care, well, I'm screwed! That's how you get people neglecting or hurting patients - because they justify it by saying, "We're so unpaid and unappreciated."

    Give me a well-compensated, highly benefitted nurse who doesn't hate her job or hours, thank you VERY much! It sure goes a long way toward nurse (and patient!) satisfaction.

    Alison
  10. by   SmilingBluEyes
    the argument of nursing being a calling versus a career is very old......

    And really, nursing is what the person who enters it SAYS it is. It can be a calling, and I can respect that. But you need to also respect, It is also often a career for OTHERS. There is NOTHING wrong with that. Many of those who call it a career bristle cause they do NOT want to be perceived as martyrs who do not deserve proper compensation for what they DO consider a PROFESSION.

    For me, it's both. It's a relatively financially-secure calling for me. How's that for muddying the waters????? rofl.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Mar 13, '05
  11. by   JVanRN
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    the argument of nursing being a calling versus a career is very old......

    And really, nursing is what the person who enters it SAYS it is. It can be a calling, and I can respect that. But you need to also respect, It is also often a career for OTHERS. There is NOTHING wrong with that. Many of those who call it a career bristle cause they do NOT want to be perceived as martyrs who do not deserve proper compensation for what they DO consider a PROFESSION.

    For me, it's both. It's a relatively financially-secure calling for me. How's that for muddying the waters????? rofl.
    Until I find that lucky person, whose "calling" it is in life to pay all my bills...then nursing is my career as far as I'm concerned. And the way it's looking I'm in this career for a while
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I respect that, JV.
  13. by   KrisRNwannabe
    i have never understood this calling thing. Do accoutants have a calling to be an accoutant? I have always thought of a calling to be a religous thing. priest and nuns have callings from god to serve him. I want to be a nurse because I love people and I love medicine. I don't feel I was called to do this. I am interested in it. i like the job secruity, and the financial secruity that comes with it. I know that some people don't like to hear that but unfortunetly, it is a reality. I am sorry but for me being able to pay the bills is part of the criteria for a job.

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