Can i still be a nurse if i am too emotional? - page 3

by Moko5327benedict16 4,692 Views | 25 Comments

Can I be a nurse if I am too emotional?... Read More


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    I will tell you the truth. If you aren't tough, you will either hate nursing or yourself or you will learn how to be tough. This profession takes a certain amount of being superhuman.
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    When I was doing clinically practice whilst studying for nursing, sometimes I would get tired, and stressed, and then get a catty nurse telling me something that was far from constructive, but plain mean. And I would cry. This happened a few times, and was highly embarrassing and inappropriate. I think I was also experiencing depression at the time which just complicated things. I worried so hard that I was screwing up all the time, and the job itself was just so darn stressful when I wanted to do everything RIGHT. I placed pressures on myself that was just not realistic.

    I have found that as I have become more confident, more mature, and more competent in my work, the stress has decreased and I don't cry unless something emotional happens, such as a client passes that was close to me, or if I hear about something that touches the "humanitarian" nerve in me. But I have more control so I can hold off on crying until I have space to do so. It's possible to develop control, and I hope that you can develop that too.
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    Quote from Moko5327benedict16
    Thanks for the article I am not a nurse but want to be one here is a example
    My mom has 2 diseases wegners disease and ms she was rushed to the hospital and I found out on Facebook when I found out I started crying and I was on the school bus on the way home when I found out and I felt like I could not stop crying
    please understand that you LOVE your mother. While you will care about (some!) of your pts., you will never love them as you do your mother. So that emotional vulnerability will not be there.

    Rather, you will likely find comfort in helping others who are navigating grief, sickness, and loss. B'c you know firsthand what that feels like. You will hopefully appreciate and realize the opportunity to pay it forward.

    Nursing will provide you an opportunity to do that work from an emotional distance. You will not feel that emotional when it comes to caring for strangers.
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    Quote from Moko5327benedict16
    Thanks for the article I am not a nurse but want to be one here is a example
    My mom has 2 diseases wegners disease and ms she was rushed to the hospital and I found out on Facebook when I found out I started crying and I was on the school bus on the way home when I found out and I felt like I could not stop crying
    I don't want to jump to conclusions about your culture, but certain cultures are more closed about expressing emotions. If you are from a culture that does not express emotions openly, it's possible that you may be considered too emotional my members of your culture, but not for the mainstream American society.
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    I loved reading this. I have always been very emotional, even with little things, but reading this helped me to understand I can still become a nurse even if I have a soft heart. Thank you!
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    You may well find that you just naturally learn to stem your tears at work. I would never say that I cried *really* easily before becoming a nurse, but I definitely cried far more easily than I do now. I think that several factors helped with this: 1) You see more and more crazy/sad/disturbing things as you progress as a nurse, so the cry-inducing potential of many situations lessens 2) There usually isn't much time for a breakdown during the average shift 3) You may find that if you learn to appear and sound calm, your "I'm going to cry" phases pass a lot faster 4) Hopefully you work with some experienced/supportive/fun people who can kind of help you reframe situations so they don't see so overwhelming to you.


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