Can employer change job description and demands? - page 2

I have been working with my present employer for numerous years. In the early days 80's, I recall a very concise job description. Through the years, the description has changed and recently the job... Read More

  1. Visit  rita359} profile page
    1
    Twenty to 30 miles is not so far. Read a post recently about how far people were travelling to get to work. You would be surprised how far people will voluntarily travel.

    Did your place of employment buy another facility or was it bought? I'd think something had changed with the facility to see this happening. If either of these happened I don't think it would be too unusual for this kind of policy to become a norm. I guess it then depends on how bad you need a job and how the job market is in your locality. Either way things will change.
    bluesnurse likes this.
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  3. Visit  rngolfer53} profile page
    1
    Quote from rita359
    Twenty to 30 miles is not so far. Read a post recently about how far people were travelling to get to work. You would be surprised how far people will voluntarily travel.

    Did your place of employment buy another facility or was it bought? I'd think something had changed with the facility to see this happening. If either of these happened I don't think it would be too unusual for this kind of policy to become a norm. I guess it then depends on how bad you need a job and how the job market is in your locality. Either way things will change.
    Whether 20 or 30 miles is a long or short way depends a lot on what those miles consist of. NYC traffic? Long way. Wyoming in the summer?.....pretty short. Montana in the winter? Could be a long, long way, or easy-peasy and gorgeous besides.

    I recall seeing a survey around 2003 or so about how far people were willing to drive to take an EMT certification test. For Ohio residents, it was about 20 minutes. For people in Montana, a couple hundred miles was ok.
    bluesnurse likes this.
  4. Visit  NRSKarenRN} profile page
    0
    As an IV homecare RN, I covered 125 mile territory in 3 states in 8-10hr day. I fully understand frustration being sent to one location, only to be called back to hospital you just left to handle situation; getting lab results and making calls to docs for updated orders while driving and being paged at same time by office that patient waiting and your late, finally driving home only to be paged again that I needed to stop for chemo disconnect as oncall RN not returning page " and we know your driving my patients home, only 5 min off interstate".....along with $800 cellphone bill, thankfully no clocking in/out.


    Employers have the right to change job descriptions to meet current business needs (I just updated my staff's including flu vaccine admin duties by RN's as we are business center and only RN staff onsite--nothing to do with referral intake). As employee, you can discuss impact on your work ability (sometimes there are unforseen/unintended consequences) then decide how much of this can you put up with if Manager unable to consider change impact...voting with your feet.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jan 5, '13
  5. Visit  MomRN0913} profile page
    0
    In the middle of my employment, our CEO decided to send out a non- compete agreement all management must sign that was very restrictive and would have basically screwed me as an rn. (especially since the CEO hated me)I refused to sign it. I said I wasn't resigning, I'm just not signing it. I was therefore terminated and I did collect unemployment. And I work in an at- will state.So research your rights first. I believe you can still receive unemployment benefits. Not sure, but a strong possibility.
  6. Visit  bluesnurse} profile page
    0
    Especially if you're in a right-to-work state, the answer is yes. My job description has changed several times over three years my current department, and we just found our our weekend commitment is being doubled in the spring.

    I'm fortunate that I really love my specialty (diagnostic cardiology) and the patients keep me grounded most of the time. I'm not sure it would be better anywhere else; I just try to let the politics go when I clock out. Easier said than done


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