Can 2 ml of fluid be administered in deltoid muscle? - page 2

There are mix opinion about that,just wonder what everyone else would think about that? Sorry I meant deltoid muscle..... Read More

  1. 1
    From Potter & Perry "Fundamentals of Nursing", regarding the deltoid site:

    The nurse should use this site only for small medication volumes, when giving immunizations, or when other sites are inaccessible because of dressings or casts.

    I was personally taught to use no more than 0.5 in a child and 1 mL in a well developed adult deltoid.
    chloecatrn likes this.

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  2. 1
    Can be done, but as pointed out, only in an adult with a well-developed deltoid, if for any reason it was not possible to give the injection in another site. After all, if the nurse is alone, the patient can't turn without assistance, both upper legs are bandaged etc etc, there's not much alternative. Just use an appropriately sized needle and administer very slowly. Not my idea of fun but sometimes it's unavoidable.
    kcochrane likes this.
  3. 1
    Quote from healthstar
    I was told 0.5 ML max
    Healthstar...who told you that?? Routine vaccinations that are always given in the
    deltoid are 1.0 ml each for an adult.
    milfordmom likes this.
  4. 1
    In the case of having no other site to inject, and with 1.0 ml being the maximum that is recommended in the deltoid, you would be well advised to
    split the dose into 2 injections and use two sites in deltoids. This would
    avoid any complications that could arise from localized tissue damage. Two ml
    dosages should go deep IM in the gluteal muscle.
    Not knowing what medication you are talking about, I would DEFINITELY double check the dosage that you are giving and the order, check it with the pharmacist if necessary. There is a famous liability case that is used for training on medication errors where some neonatal nurses gave a dose that was many times the therapeutic dose to an infant because of an error in a decimal point on the doctor's orders. The infant died, the nurses were prosecuted, etc. etc. No happy endings there. ALWAYS err on the side of safety-for you and the patient!
    If it is the correct medication, and you still are faced with having to inject 2ml's worth, see if (the pharmacy-or whatever entity is supplying the med) has a different strength available. If you can get a less dilute mixture, then you will inject less-but without knowing what med you are referring to, unsure if this can be done.
    Last edit by katkonk on Sep 17, '10 : Reason: addition
    tyvin likes this.
  5. 0
    When Phosphenytoin first hit the market, the drug rep insisted that the deltoid was good for 10cc and dorsalgluteal or ventrogluteal for 30cc! He admitted it'd feel "squishy" for a while getting that much.
    I don't know anybody who was ever brave enough to give near that much. On/as a big person I've given/received 2cc in the deltoid with no problem. As always, your mileage may vary.
  6. 1
    Quote from dthfytr
    When Phosphenytoin first hit the market, the drug rep insisted that the deltoid was good for 10cc and dorsalgluteal or ventrogluteal for 30cc! He admitted it'd feel "squishy" for a while getting that much.
    Sweet Christmas! It'd feel squishy because the freaking deltoid was replaced BY the med. How crazy!
    Daisy Doodle likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from iteachob
    From Potter & Perry "Fundamentals of Nursing", regarding the deltoid site:
    Good call. I suppose I could've visited my friends Potter and Perry since they live downstairs on my bookshelf to give my answer actual backup, but I was lazy. Thank you for actually giving real, live citations.
  8. 0
    Another aspect is, what do you do if you have a morbidly obese patient for whom the MD, in his wisdom, has written up IM meds? The gluteus and quadriceps are covered with such a deep fat layer that no needle-except possibly a spinal needle!-is long enough to reach through those rolls and actually penetrate the muscle. I've had situations like that, and the deltoid is the only option.
  9. 2
    Quote from Christine Cameron-Do
    The gluteus and quadriceps are covered with such a deep fat layer that no needle-except possibly a spinal needle!-is long enough to reach through those rolls and actually penetrate the muscle. I've had situations like that, and the deltoid is the only option.
    it has been my opinion that the vastus lateralis, has less fat than the quads, and have opted to inject there vs deltoid.
    in a side-lying position, the fat tends to droop towards the quads (on an obese person), making it even a more viable site.

    leslie
    katkonk and tewdles like this.
  10. 0
    I completely agree leslie...that is my preferred site really for any IM injection.


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