Call Us Nurse or Call Us ???What??? - page 3

If you could pick what professional title "nurses" could be called instead of the title "nurse", what title would you want to be called......professionally speaking? :nurse:... Read More

  1. by   azgirl
    Gwenith what are nurses referred to now instead of sister?
  2. by   jemb
    How about CYA, EET. (EET of course stands for 'everyone else's, too'.)

    Seriously, though, I like RN. I introduce myself as "the RN that will be working with you today".
  3. by   grneyes676
    I introduce myself by my first name, and tell the pt that I will be the nurse taking care of them for the night. I greet pt's by Mr/Mrs/Miss most of the time, occ. we get young pt's and I will refer to them by there first name and ask if that is what they go by or would they like me to refer to them in another way.
  4. by   WhiteCaps
    _________________


    RN is good, but I think what Cheerfuldoer was asking for was a prefix kind of name. Like "Doctor"... he/she worked hard (harder) for the MD but doesn't introduce himself as MD Smith.

    Has anyone ever introduced themselves as "I'm Nurse Mary... or whatever?" Why does that sound weird?
  5. by   RNonsense
    I always call myself by my first name.
    I always use RN too.
    I don't think it really has anything to do with being/not being professional at all, I think it's a personal decision with whatever makes you comfortable.
    I call my doctor and dentist "Dr. So-and-so" and yet I call my lawyers, etc by their first name. It doesn't mean I respect one more than the other.
  6. by   live4today
    Originally posted by WhiteCaps
    _________________


    RN is good, but I think what Cheerfuldoer was asking for was a prefix kind of name. Like "Doctor"... he/she worked hard (harder) for the MD but doesn't introduce himself as MD Smith.

    Has anyone ever introduced themselves as "I'm Nurse Mary... or whatever?" Why does that sound weird?
    Exactly what I was asking for, but that's okay as long as everyone is having fun, laughing, and interacting...letting go of stress...unwinding here....learning from one another...thinking and adding new thoughts to their "Nurse Diary". :kiss
  7. by   mattsmom81
    When I started in nursing (dark ages) we were addressed as "Nurse (last name)". But I trained and worked in a military type hospital, so we were a bit more rigid than most. I was 'Nurse Young' then and got teased about that... got called "Young Nurse Young" then "Older Nurse Young" etc...LOL.

    I do go by my first name now as its the fashion. Sometimes i do wonder if it's a mistake that we have gotten too familiar.....maybe Nurse Jones (like Dr Jones) is a good thing.

    Pet peeve is the patient/family who yells a generic "NURSE...come here"....after I've introduced myself more than once.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Aug 7, '03
  8. by   live4today
    :chuckle I hate that too, mattsmom! Nurse, nurse, nurse!!! PUL - LEEZZZZ! GIVE IT UP ALREADY!
  9. by   sjoe
    "Do you think patients demote our status as caregivers because they call us by our first names like we're their newfound friend? "

    Yes! Why else do you think docs always want to be introduced and addressed by their last names? I refer to myself by my last name and I address patients and co-workers by their last names. This is a formal, professional interaction, not one between friends.

    I don't like the title "nurse" either, since it has so little status or respect, being used by everyone from the assistant-to-the-nursing assistant up to the director of nursing. Receptionists, ward clerks, housekeepers, candystripers, etc. are often called "nurse" by patients. (You don't hear these people being called "doctor" by mistake, do you?)

    I usually use "RN" or "Registered Nurse," but we should be able to come up with something better, IMHO.
    Last edit by sjoe on Aug 7, '03
  10. by   renerian
    I like RN.

    renerian
  11. by   moonshadeau
    When I introduce myself to my patients I say, " Hi. I am Jackie. I will be the REGISTERED NURSE that will be taking care of you today from 6am to 6:30pm. Mr/Ms... what do you prefer to be addressed as? This is the plan for today as I know it. Do you have any questions or concerns? Blah, blah, blah.."

    I am not a nurse. I am a registered nurse. "Nurse" is too broad of a description word. I worked hard for my RN and deserve to be recognized by my patients as such.

    Nurse Jackie just sounds plain corny to me. That would be as hard to adjust to as having me wear a white dress and cap.

    IMHO, our problem with professionalism is that we as nurses have no standard in the way we conduct or identify ourselves.
  12. by   EricTAMUCC-BSN
    Originally posted by cheerfuldoer: If you could pick what professional title "nurses" could be called instead of the title "nurse", what title would you want to be called......professionally speaking?



    I agree with Dianah and Cheerfuldoer. I think Professional Care Coordinator (PCC) is appropriate. However I would like to take the title a little further.

    I know that many of you prefer the title nurse. This was fine 100 years ago, but as we grow and branch out into new areas our title needs to reflect our role more accurately. I would like to see our title become more area specific. For example an operating room nurse could be called Surgical Care Coordinator, an ICU nurse could hold the title of Intensive Care Coordinator and so on.

    Nurse is too general. Do we call all public safety officials police officers? No, we call them fire fighters, police officers, and paramedics. These titles are role specific as opposed to "nurse".
  13. by   HARN
    I have no problem with nurse....I think the public is aware of the stresses on our field they know WE DO IT ALL!!!!!!!

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