Call to organ donation center post pt death - page 3

Hi there - I'm questioning a policy my hospital has and am wondering what other hospitals do. I have not encountered this at other hospitals mainly because they've been larger, and have had "death... Read More

  1. Visit  WeepingAngel profile page
    1
    I think the first time was my first patient death, ever, and the patient had died from metastatic cancer. As soon as I told them that they were like oh ok thank you for your time! The second time I forget the specifics but they weren't interested then either. I'm sure if the person was a potential donor they'd have all kinds of questions.
    nrsang97 likes this.
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  3. Visit  Elvish profile page
    0
    The ones I have had to call about are always extreme prematurity deaths....never takes long, and they're obviously not candidates for donation. I'm talking 17, 18-weekers born alive and live for a few minutes/hours.
  4. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    0
    Quote from WeepingAngel
    I've called NEOB twice and I was only on the phone for a couple of minutes.
    It really depends and if they got a new coordinator on the phone they don't go straight to the point or they go to the point and keep going. It is always helpful to have your facility have a worksheet so you can have all the information available and streamlined.
  5. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    0
    Quote from Elvish
    The ones I have had to call about are always extreme prematurity deaths....never takes long, and they're obviously not candidates for donation. I'm talking 17, 18-weekers born alive and live for a few minutes/hours.
    We had to call for those, and also for IUFDs. Those were always interesting. "No, I don't know when the patient died, but he was born today." It was never more than a few minutes, but very weird when I first started doing it. I like the idea that it's taken out of the nurses' hands. You don't have to hope that a nurse is persuasive, approves of donation, has a good relationship with the family, etc.
  6. Visit  umcRN profile page
    0
    Yes. We always call. Even in the NICU with the 23-24 week preemies (who are never candidates).
  7. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    0
    This is an interesting thread for me... when I worked in the hospital, it was ALWAYS the attending MD who made the call. They called the ME and then they called the Organ Bank. The vast majority of our deaths were from cancer so the patients never qualified to be organ donors.
  8. Visit  Overwhelmed1026 profile page
    0
    One of my Nursing school classmates works for the organ procurement center. She has weeks where she is on call to do the cornea harvesting, then other weeks were it is her job to approach the families. She really enjoys the harvesting, not so much the approaching loved ones. I have a badge for the organ procurement line with all the criteria that outlines a call to them.
  9. Visit  anotherone profile page
    0
    Hmm, I didn't know anything about these calls. i guess where I work the doctors do this. No nurse that I work with has ever made a call of this type on my unit.
  10. Visit  klone profile page
    1
    Quote from Altra
    It does not violate HIPAA. I have made these calls countless times. In my experience, call takes no more than 7-8 minutes provided that you have the appropriate information gathered before calling: patient demographics (including SS#), past medical history, and a timeline of the interventions leading to up to the patient's death.
    How does that NOT violate HIPAA? Next of kin has not given permission to disclose patient's PHI to a third party (yet). Are they exempt from HIPAA under federal law?
    Last edit by klone on Mar 12, '13
    LogCabinMom likes this.
  11. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    I imagine it is written in there somewhere. As i said in my first comment, HIPAA just makes it easier for the persons you DON'T want to have access, to have access....
    Quote from klone
    How does that NOT violate HIPAA? Next of kin has not given permission to disclose patient's PHI to a third party (yet). Are they exempt from HIPAA under federal law?
  12. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    4
    Quote from klone
    How does that NOT violate HIPAA? Next of kin has not given permission to disclose patient's PHI to a third party (yet). Are they exempt from HIPAA under federal law?
    It is the necessary disclosure of healthcare information in the care of that patient mandated by law.....it is a "need to know" situation.
    canesdukegirl, nrsang97, Altra, and 1 other like this.
  13. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    BUT Esme! there is no patient! There is no care!
    Quote from Esme12
    It is the necessary disclosure of healthcare information in the care of that patient mandated by law.....it is a "need to know" situation.
  14. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    1
    Quote from klone
    How does that NOT violate HIPAA? Next of kin has not given permission to disclose patient's PHI to a third party (yet). Are they exempt from HIPAA under federal law?
    In the same way that it doesn't violate HIPAA to notify an insurance company of things going on with a patient or for me to call an MD about one of my Home Health patients. It is necessary to share information with these parties just as it is to notify the medical examiner and the local organ procurement organization about a death which occurs in the hospital.
    Altra likes this.


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