Burnout? - page 6

]I've only been a nurse for 3 years, but I'm afraid I am completely burned out. I find myself wanting to do a public service announcement on how to be a good patient. I am sick to death of patients... Read More

  1. by   cooblu
    Quote from Pageantnurse
    This is why I work Travel and per diem. With travel I am gone right around the time I am ready to pimp slap someone and with local agency I just say "don't send me back there, it sucks" once the agency nurses put the word out on a place they can't get coverage and they straighten out their issue real fast.
    exactly! and so it goes for some of those agencies
  2. by   cooblu
    frustration and loads of it. what i'm reading is certainly true of bedside nursing. still i early on was climbing the ladder of the business/marketing part of hospital healthcare and i understand (kind of) why. i come to terms with myself (to yourself be true) and returned to bedside for several years now. i'm concerned about the near future of nursing, the numbers of us aging old farts are overwhelming. i see nursing students or new grads and i don't know where to start escept to prepare themselves. if i were to in position to be hiring nurse in a facility i would put a sound sense of humor and ethics up with clinical skills and education. my goal is five more years, if thats possible.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from bigsyis
    i can't say that i hate them, but i sure do hate their behavior. our society has permitted bad behavior for so long and made excuses of all types for why those people should be allowed to continue as they have before. now they are being enabled to continue on, by our self-same society. wrong is still wrong, it doesn't matter who does it. making excuses for bad behavior makes it no less wrong! the right to act as an a$$hole ends where my rights begin. the 'hated' people are the ones that don't realize that nurses (and other members of society) have rights!
    people have become a lot more boorish, entitled and rude over the 30 years i've been working as a nurse. and some nurses continue to make excuses for their bad behavior. "they're stressed because their loved one is ill," or "how would you feel if you were visiting your father in the hospital and he hadn't been shaved?"

    i've been in the hospital as have my parents and dh and i've gone out of my way to be polite and respectful of the staff and of their time. i can understand that a small percentage of the population doesn't know how to behave because their parents never taught them but that percentage seems to be growing pretty danged fast! we as nurses need to stop making excuses for bad behavior and instruct people on how to act if they don't already know. it's unfortunate that people didn't learn this when they were still little and cute, but there you are.

    a simple "please don't talk to me that way" may be all it takes. on the other hand, you could whack some folks with a 2x4 and not make an impression!
  4. by   maconnurse
    Personal hygiene is very important to families. Especially having daddy shave is one of them. You look sicker to me when your hair is unkept and you have a beard. Unfortunately, the staff to patient ration now does now allow these little extras. I as a nurse provided much of the personal hygiene for my father when he was in the hospital because I knew the situation. The average public does not understand this and probably never will.

    It is easy to get burned out when you fill you are just treading water and never swimming. Hang in there.
  5. by   KJB_65
    My family and friends have a running joke about how long I stay at a job. My record in the same spot is 2 1/2 years. My answer to them is always the same. "you try doing this crap".
  6. by   lindarn
    Quote from maconnurse
    Personal hygiene is very important to families. Especially having daddy shave is one of them. You look sicker to me when your hair is unkept and you have a beard. Unfortunately, the staff to patient ration now does now allow these little extras. I as a nurse provided much of the personal hygiene for my father when he was in the hospital because I knew the situation. The average public does not understand this and probably never will.

    It is easy to get burned out when you fill you are just treading water and never swimming. Hang in there.
    But isn't it about time that we informed the public of the charade that is their health care? That we spend more time documenting what we are supposed to do, but never really have the time to do it? That more and more professional nursing care is being provided by unlicensed assistive personnel, not the educated, registered nurse they though they were paying for? That we have 100% of the responsibility, and accountability, but none of the control.

    We have become enablers of the hospital admistration who have allowed this to progress to the point that it has. Rather than saying, " this is impossible to do, and we refuse", we say, "we will just work harder, and not take breaks, get out an hour late, and not even put in for overtime for our missed breaks, and the late exit out of work. And oh, I can come in on my day off!

    Why do we do this? Some one put an end to this madness!! Stop playing the "martyr mary", and make the changes that are needed. Support the nurse who speaks up and the staff meetings. Inform the patients what the nurse patient ratio is. Tell them how many patients you are responsible for. If the hospital complains, call the news and TV stations, and go public. It is about time.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  7. by   registerednut1221
    Quote from lindarn
    But isn't it about time that we informed the public of the charade that is their health care? That we spend more time documenting what we are supposed to do, but never really have the time to do it? That more and more professional nursing care is being provided by unlicensed assistive personnel, not the educated, registered nurse they though they were paying for? That we have 100% of the responsibility, and accountability, but none of the control.

    We have become enablers of the hospital admistration who have allowed this to progress to the point that it has. Rather than saying, " this is impossible to do, and we refuse", we say, "we will just work harder, and not take breaks, get out an hour late, and not even put in for overtime for our missed breaks, and the late exit out of work. And oh, I can come in on my day off!

    Why do we do this? Some one put an end to this madness!! Stop playing the "martyr mary", and make the changes that are needed. Support the nurse who speaks up and the staff meetings. Inform the patients what the nurse patient ratio is. Tell them how many patients you are responsible for. If the hospital complains, call the news and TV stations, and go public. It is about time.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Amen! By some estimations, the US alone is expected to be some 1 million nurses short by the year 2020. Yes, that's 1 MILLION! At the rate things are going, I think that estimate may be way too low. For all of the patient's and patient's families who expect someone to come charging into their room full speed ahead every time Daddy needs a cup of coffee, they need to stop and consider that there will come a time when Daddy is lying there in cardiac arrest and there will be NO ONE to come to his aid. Why? Because nurses are so abused at this point that they're leaving the profession as quickly as they came into it and they are NOT recommending that anyone else chose this as a career. I am sick and tired of being expected to do the impossible on a daily basis with limited resources and limited time. I had one patient who actually told me "that's what you get paid the big bucks for!" Big bucks my @$$!
  8. by   Mulan
    Quote from maconnurse
    Personal hygiene is very important to families. Especially having daddy shave is one of them. You look sicker to me when your hair is unkept and you have a beard. Unfortunately, the staff to patient ration now does now allow these little extras. I as a nurse provided much of the personal hygiene for my father when he was in the hospital because I knew the situation. The average public does not understand this and probably never will.

    It is easy to get burned out when you fill you are just treading water and never swimming. Hang in there.

    Yeah, and too bad these people that are so concerned about someone being shaved couldn't do it themselves. Or maybe a son help a father use the urinal? God forbid!
  9. by   lindarn
    Quote from lindarn
    But isn't it about time that we informed the public of the charade that is their health care? That we spend more time documenting what we are supposed to do, but never really have the time to do it? That more and more professional nursing care is being provided by unlicensed assistive personnel, not the educated, registered nurse they though they were paying for? That we have 100% of the responsibility, and accountability, but none of the control.

    We have become enablers of the hospital admistration who have allowed this to progress to the point that it has. Rather than saying, " this is impossible to do, and we refuse", we say, "we will just work harder, and not take breaks, get out an hour late, and not even put in for overtime for our missed breaks, and the late exit out of work. And oh, I can come in on my day off!

    Why do we do this? Some one put an end to this madness!! Stop playing the "martyr mary", and make the changes that are needed. Support the nurse who speaks up and the staff meetings. Inform the patients what the nurse patient ratio is. Tell them how many patients you are responsible for. If the hospital complains, call the news and TV stations, and go public. It is about time.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    I forgot to add a little poem that was posted in the nurses station in a former job, about 100 years ago:

    "We the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible, for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, that we are now qualified to do anything with nothing".

    Does this describe the current state of affairs in hospitals today? This was written sometime in the late 1970's. Somethings never change!!

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  10. by   SICU Queen
    OMG I LOOOOOOVE that little quote of yours!!!

    Snagged!
  11. by   cooblu
    Quote from nursejojo
    sorry guys, have to disagree with you on this one. love my patients, love my job, great bunch of co-workers who regulary meet for drinks and dinner and doctors who do what we tell them instead of the other way round. maybe im just niave as i have just qualified. remind me of what i said in 5 years when im on here saying....i hate my job, hate doctors, hate patients etc...
    holy hell for real?? would love to try this, sounds like a normal society but not as i've experienced in this prof----maybe it's me........
  12. by   cooblu
    Quote from RainDreamer


    When I'm in the intermediate nursery I bundle mine up super tight just for that reason ..... so they don't move or cry! But then again, they're on monitors so I don't have to tickle their feet
    yessss, whatever it takes to be able to breath...might try hitting the code button (by accident) just to see who else is breathing. hey it could get you otta the crib room.
  13. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from lindarn
    That more and more professional nursing care is being provided by unlicensed assistive personnel, not the educated, registered nurse they though they were paying for?
    Once again, there's a licensed nurse in between the UAP and RN, and once again, you ignore us.

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