Building a new hosptial...bedside charting...meds in the rooms? - page 3

Our facility is getting ready to break ground this summer for a brand new hospital. The one we have now has been around since Moses disembarked off the ark....;) Anyway, administration has been... Read More

  1. by   whipping girl in 07
    I'm glad I stumbled across this thread, since the hospital I'm presently employed at is planning to build a new heart hospital and the design that was chosen is much like the pod system that Dr. Kate and SallyICU_RN described. I just kept thinking as our director gushed over the beautiful plans (management words ) that they were trying to separate the nurses, keep us from seeing each other or talking to each other. I like my job and enjoy the patient interaction, but if I have two vent patients for three nights in a row, in a little pod all by myself, I guarantee you I will go crazy without having anyone to talk to, except for when I drag someone down there for the q2hr turns. Ugh, and what if my "podmate" is another nurse that I detest?! I realize I'm not there to necessarily have fun, but I'm not a robot. I'm not going to stay in a job if I don't enjoy it.
  2. by   Sally_ICURN
    Originally posted by konni
    ...that they were trying to separate the nurses, keep us from seeing each other or talking to each other. I like my job and enjoy the patient interaction, but if I have two vent patients for three nights in a row, in a little pod all by myself, I guarantee you I will go crazy without having anyone to talk to, except for when I drag someone down there for the q2hr turns. Ugh, and what if my "podmate" is another nurse that I detest?! I realize I'm not there to necessarily have fun, but I'm not a robot.
    It would seem that it would be this way, but I find that there's so much to do that it's so nice to be able to give excellent patient care using everything you need at your fingertips. People are in and out of our rooms all the time especially on days...docs, families, RT, PT, OT, social services, etc., something is always going on. It's not quite as busy during nocs but the only time I really feel isolated is when I'm in a private room 1:1, but then again sometimes this is a nice break. The charge nurse rounds frequently for condition updates and if I ever needed ANYTHING from another RN all I have to do is call--we have what we call floats who are RN's specifically assigned to a certain number of rooms to help out and give breaks--floats are staff RN's on our unit and we all take our turn floating. Usually there's a CNA for the 29 beds on days but not nights and we do primary nursing. The RN's do it all--we are a very self-sufficient ICU. People socialize in suites and quite often nurses on break will go "visiting" into other rooms. I dunno, I suppose it could sound kind of socially stagnant, but really, I don't go to work to socialize and there's not a lot of time for it anyway...we're really busy! Fortunately, I have never felt as though our management wants to seperate the nurses, quite the contrary actually, I feel we are a strong, tightly knit group (including the docs) of professionals supported by our nursing management with a common goal...quality patient care.

    ~Sally
  3. by   angelbear
    What about HIPPA? Couldnt the pt's and their families hear everything when you are on the phone with docs or lab etc... Wouldnt that violate HIPPA rules? And wouldnt the constant interaction with families and visitors open us up to more questions from them that we are not allowed to answer? Also why do you need another nurse to verify insulin? Never heard of that here. Thanks
  4. by   Sally_ICURN
    Originally posted by angelbear
    What about HIPPA?
    Also why do you need another nurse to verify insulin?
    HIPAA has not been an issue at my hospital that I know of....yet?

    On my unit, we don't check insulin or heparin or anything other than blood products with another RN.

    ~Sally
  5. by   Allison S.
    Moses parted the sea, Noah opted for an ark, and I sometimes take the commuter boat.

    I'm not sure how i feel about meds in rooms. It sounds like it is more trouble than it is worth. In our instance, it would also mess with our inventory control system (Suremed).

    We are supposed to keep the flowsheets at bedside, but most days they end up piling up at the central desk. I like the idea of sitting down in the patient's room to give them a few extra minutes of presence while you document, though. Im not sure about standing at a shelf. I think that OSHA and the ergonomics people would have a field day with that.

    We are about to start charting with rolling computers. Not only are there fewer computers than there are staff, but I can't imagine that the height will work for everyone. (I'm 6 feet.)

    I have often thought that nurses need a locking cabinet in each room for supplies, etc. It would also help on those days when you have drawn up a dozen meds for someone who you then discover is reading Moby Dick on the toilet. At our facillity, it seems that the only acceptable place to store all those meds is in your pocket. yuck!

    Good luck.
  6. by   deespoohbear
    Originally posted by Allison S.
    Im not sure about standing at a shelf. I think that OSHA and the ergonomics people would have a field day with that.

    Hey I never even thought about that issue. Something else for me to bring up.....Thanks!!!
    :kiss
  7. by   plumrn
    Just a quick aside from the thread, but I just wondered how it is elsewhere. Here we are taught in nursing school to check your insulin dose with another nurse after you draw it up, before you remove the needle from the vial, so that the other nurse can verify the type of insulin, the accuracy of the dose, and the expiration date.
    This is even in the policy and procedure manual at our hospital.

    Truly, I always thought it strange we are trusted to inject cardiac drugs, narcotics, etc., without checking the dose, but not insulin.
    At least we can reverse the insulin if too much is given, but cardiac drugs, and others, possibly not.

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