Breaching StaRN Contract - page 4

Hello, I need some help! I'm a new graduate nurse that started working on a very busy medical-surgical unit in April. In order for me to accept the job, I was required to sign a 2 year contract that... Read More

  1. by   Bella_CO
    It was expected of me in my nursing program's clinical rotations (especially during capstone) required me doing 99% of our preceptor job.
  2. by   Purple_roses
    As a new grad I can honestly say that these are *not* "typical" new grad struggles. I have 4-6 patients a night-exactly the number I was told I would have when I accepted the position. I do have aids every single night (yes, sometimes we are short staffed and have more to do. That's life). Nobody has EVER told me not to perform essential nursing assessments or tasks in order to do aid duties. And nobody has EVER encouraged me to falsify documentation (now that actually can get your license ripped to shreds).

    None of this is ok and all of this is stressful, new grad or not.
  3. by   cyc0sys
    I'd be more concerned with where you're going, not necessarily where you've been. Before you get your ducks in a row, consider where you actually want to work.

    I have to agree with some of the other posters when they say those 1:8 patient ratios aren't unique, even without an aide. You can also expect to get the 'code brown's', 'difficult' patients, or more patients with a lower acuity, which may seem unfair but is often par for the course. While things might be different for your peers, it might not be the apples to apples scenario you perceive.

    I'm not quite sure what advantages you were hoping to obtain from a Starn med/surg position. Most new nurses here start out in med/surg anyway without the StaRN program and it's also an HCA hospital. The programs here are specifically for the ER, ICU, and CCU which are difficult positions to obtain with <1 year experience.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but my understanding is the program is 14 weeks long and once completed you pickup a base salary instead of orientation pay.
    Last edit by cyc0sys on Oct 19, '17 : Reason: grammar
  4. by   Insperation
    I left a similiar situation at a simliar HCA hospital. People break their contracts there ALL the time. What are they gonna due...serve you with papers? Show up at your doorstep with a lawyer? I don't think so.

    The fact that HCA still uses meditech just goes to show how pathetic their leadership is and how badly they care about saving money.

    Be thankful you still have a license, find a new job(trust me it will be better) and put it behind you. That's what I did. I couldn't be happier.

    GO UHS system! GO cerner!
  5. by   MunoRN
    Quote from Insperation
    I left a similiar situation at a simliar HCA hospital. People break their contracts there ALL the time. What are they gonna due...serve you with papers? Show up at your doorstep with a lawyer? I don't think so.

    The fact that HCA still uses meditech just goes to show how pathetic their leadership is and how badly they care about saving money.

    Be thankful you still have a license, find a new job(trust me it will be better) and put it behind you. That's what I did. I couldn't be happier.

    GO UHS system! GO cerner!
    Yes, they very well may take action against you and it's not unheard of for employers to aggressively seek reimbursement. There are even some state BONs that will suspend your license for nursing related debt, this typically applies to student loan debt but can also include breach of contract penalties.
  6. by   Bella_CO
    The recruiter actually lied to us about the pay raise. It's not base pay after orientation--it's much less. Yes, the first 7 weeks of orientation is class work and hospital paperwork; the last 7 weeks is on the unit with a preceptor.

    The patient population wasn't low acuity, which is why our patient load wasn't safe without CNA's too. I'm also talking about day shift.
  7. by   MedSurgRN14
    I am sorry this happened to you. As others mentioned, consult a lawyer. I read on another thread that a nurse signed a similar contract and quit before her commitment was completed, and she did not have to pay anything because they cannot force you to pay that amount because it is illegal.

    In the future, I would stay away from such arrangements. Employers force such contracts on new grads under the guise of preventing new grads from leaving early and to prevent loss of $$ from training, but I have also thought it was due to high turnover rate from poor working conditions. Please keep us posted. I totally sympathize with your situation. That is why many nurses leave bedside as it is dangerous and exploitative.
  8. by   Daisy Joyce
    Bosses and recruiters are not friends.
    They're not evil, but they're not watching your back, but the bottom line of their company.
    So, if it seems too good to be true, it is.
    If you want to know what the real staffing numbers are, go by word of mouth. Or work there as a per diem.
    Best of luck
  9. by   OrganizedChaos
    Nothing you stated seems like a shock to me. I've worked in several different nursing homes where I would be LUCKY if I got a break or got to the bathroom.

    I never signed a contract or anything but honestly, that's what nursing is now. I had 30-50 residents to care for & yes I had CNAs but that doesn't mean I leave "little things" for the aides to do. They are just as busy as I am.

    I would NEVER sign a contract without reading it thoroughly first. You don't know what you're getting yourself into until it's too late. I wouldn't quit until you talk to a lawyer & secure a new job. You don't want to quit, have burned a bridge & then have payments coming in but no way to make them.
  10. by   caliotter3
    Quote from MunoRN
    Yes, they very well may take action against you and it's not unheard of for employers to aggressively seek reimbursement. There are even some state BONs that will suspend your license for nursing related debt, this typically applies to student loan debt but can also include breach of contract penalties.
    A judgement is collectible for a certain time period (ten years). At the end of that time period, the creditor can go back to court and have the judgement reaffirmed. And it is very common for creditors with a valid judgement to go after one's bank accounts. The money is gone before the account holder even has any idea what is going on. And all of this, including the original court case bringing about the default judgement, can take place without the defendant having an inkling. The process server commits perjury when stating that he legally served notice. All of this information can be verified by perusing the internet. You can find it in many places. How can one sleep at night, ignoring a debt, and always wondering what steps have been taken against them or where in the process, the collection of the debt might be? Creditors go after far less than $10,000. All information that can be gleaned from the internet.
  11. by   sugar12
    I encountered the same problem. I signed a contract with StarN program at HCA and quit before my contract was over. They never came after me and even paid me my PTO balance. It was definitely a risk but I was miserable there. Same experience as you. That was almost 2 years ago. Never heard from them since.
  12. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Bella_CO
    The recruiter actually lied to us about the pay raise. It's not base pay after orientation--it's much less. Yes, the first 7 weeks of orientation is class work and hospital paperwork; the last 7 weeks is on the unit with a preceptor.

    The patient population wasn't low acuity, which is why our patient load wasn't safe without CNA's too. I'm also talking about day shift.
    Could you elaborate? What did they say they were going to pay you after orientation? And then what did they actually pay you?
  13. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from TriciaJ
    I'm not remotely qualified to give legal advice, but I'm with Hppy. If it was me, I would not rush to pay them $10K. Certainly not in 60 days. Maybe in 60 years. Collections? That's just people bugging you on the phone. They can be told where to go. The hospital can take you to small claims court and maybe even get a judgement against you. But it's still up to them to figure out how to collect it.


    Collections isn't just people bugging you on the phone. Debts that go to collections can affect your credit. That can be a big deal - it can keep you from borrowing money, renting an apartment, etc. Debts don't just disappear because you ignore them. If they sent your debt to collections, you NEED to address it somehow - either pay up or fight them about paying it. But don't just ignore it!

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