Breaching StaRN Contract - page 3

Hello, I need some help! I'm a new graduate nurse that started working on a very busy medical-surgical unit in April. In order for me to accept the job, I was required to sign a 2 year contract that... Read More

  1. by   SummitRN
    Quote from Bella_CO
    The contract is broadly written to include both termination or resignation--I would still have to pay 10k. I don't want to ruin my life with this.
    Then they could fire you on day one and demand 10K?

    Wow! I'm going to start a company and get rich quick!

    Except... that would be totally unenforceable (IANAL).
  2. by   PeakRN
    I'm going to assume that are in the Denver area based on your name. None of your experiences are unique to HCA or any of the other big players in the Denver area. DHMC and the Kaiser system have a whole different set of frustrations. Pay is a pittance compared to cost of living in every system, and every system has their own way to pinch pennies. There is a reason why so many of the nurses end up leaving the state after their new grad commitments.
  3. by   SC_RNDude
    Contracts have to have consideration "something of value" from BOTH sides. What did they promise you, and did they live by it? Simply giving you a job usually doesn't qualify. And, an employer is required to make sure you are able to do your job. So, giving you the same orientation and training they give everyone, including those who don't sign contracts, usually wouldn't qualify either.

    Who signed the contract on the employers side? Was it a local recruiter? If so, it's likely the recruiter isn't someone who is authorized to sign into legal agreements on the behalf of HCA.

    In my opinion, many of these new grad contracts are designed to scare you into staying, and aren't binding.
  4. by   Ms.UndastoodRn
    I didn't work for a HCA but took a contract in Indiana with a similar outcome. Apparently at this facility, CNA's aren't licensed so they can't perform basically anything. No accuchecks, can't deliver trays, unable to do vitals and were unwilling to chart I & O's etc.....On dayshift, working on a neuro floor this is disastrous (unsafe). Ratio was 5-6:1 without any relief from ancillary help, mostly 6 some nurses had taken 7 but travel didn't. The majority of the travelers didn't stay on contract including me past 6 weeks. All this wasn't divulged at the time of the interview, I was actually told the opposite. I had CNA's coming to me telling me what I hadn't done. Big NO in my book. In the fine print of my contract it said I would owe them $1000 if I breached the contract, which also wasn't divulged but that was my fault for not reading the contract in it's entirety. I gladly paid the money but 10,000 is totally different and should be PRORATED since you did complete 6 months of the contract. I'm not sure this helps at all but just know that this is the new NORMAL. I've met nurses that quit due to these conditions and became truck drivers. I love nursing and keep trudging along but anything that puts my license at jeopardy I will not be apart of.
    Last edit by Ms.UndastoodRn on Oct 18, '17 : Reason: word spelled wrong
  5. by   SummitRN
    Do you know anyone who has had to pay AFTER consulting legal representation? Or is that just what the rumor mill says because management has insert these rumors into the mill?
  6. by   Bella_CO
    I've spoken to all of my friends and colleagues who are nurses at other hospitals, and they are shocked when I explain to them all of things that happened on my unit involving staffing and management. I've also worked in the nursing field for 8 years. Through that time, I've done work at nursing homes with approximately 30 total care residents (provided all basic needs). I know what I experienced as a new graduate nurse is NOT normal (as did my coworkers who were experienced nurses). We had such a high turnover rate on our unit that most days and nights we had more agency nurses than our own. Some of my preceptors were new graduates (graduated same time as me) hired a few months prior. We lost so many of our employees that the charge nurses had 12 months nursing experience (sweet for them).
  7. by   That Guy
    Quote from Bella_CO
    I've spoken to all of my friends and colleagues who are nurses at other hospitals, and they are shocked when I explain to them all of things that happened on my unit involving staffing and management. I've also worked in the nursing field for 8 years. Through that time, I've done work at nursing homes with approximately 30 total care residents (provided all basic needs). I know what I experienced as a new graduate nurse is NOT normal (as did my coworkers who were experienced nurses). We had such a high turnover rate on our unit that most days and nights we had more agency nurses than our own. Some of my preceptors were new graduates (graduated same time as me) hired a few months prior. We lost so many of our employees that the charge nurses had 12 months nursing experience (sweet for them).
    Where do your friends work because what you describe does not shock me in the least.
  8. by   Bella_CO
    They mostly work for large hospital corporations, but not HCA.
  9. by   Dohardthings
    I worked in a Magnet hospital and I typically had 6 patients on my med-surg teli floor (and we were the good floor, some had 8). Sometimes I had a PCT, Sometimes not. We had to do everything, including drawing blood. What you described sounded beyond typical and not shocking at all. I am now in Critical Care and I have a 1:3 ratio and am just as busy, non stop with super sick patients. I would of suggested to stick it out and move on after if it didn't work out, but honesly, if you have quit already, then you are really up a creek without a paddle and probably for a long long time.

    But if anyone gets the same contract in the future, I would steer clear.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    I'm not remotely qualified to give legal advice, but I'm with Hppy. If it was me, I would not rush to pay them $10K. Certainly not in 60 days. Maybe in 60 years. Collections? That's just people bugging you on the phone. They can be told where to go. The hospital can take you to small claims court and maybe even get a judgement against you. But it's still up to them to figure out how to collect it.

    Yes, I would play hardball. Doubtful there's a union at that hospital. But there is a state labour board. Please call them. I don't know how such a contract can be legal. If they had paid you a sign-on bonus and required you to pay it back, that would be one thing. But they get to fire you and then collect $10K? That's just laughable.

    I would tell these dirt bags to fly a kite and let the chips fall where they may. But that's just me. I hope the lawyer gets back to you soon. Good luck and hang in there.
  11. by   TriciaJ
    Are you in a work at will state? Or whatever it's called. Which means they can fire you without cause. Think about it. They can hire a new grad under this dubious contract, then fire him/her after 23 months. Oops. You owe us 10 grand. Now we can hire another new grad and get 23 months of work and 10 grand out of her. Great business model but not remotely legal.
  12. by   catsmeow1972
    welcome to the world of for profit medicine. Places like this (and yes, HCA is one of the biggest offenders) do this in order to attract newbies who need that first nursing job. They get it and are afraid to leave for the exact reasons stated above. So they get the stuffing kicked out of them and if they make it to the 2 years mark or whatever, they wonder why they ever went into nursing at all and we have another bedside nurse running for the hills.
    From the corporations side they see, hey...another warm body. We are nothing but another cost of doing business in the world of for profit medicine.
    In a slightly inverse manner i was a tech in a nonprofit facility. i received a sort of in kind grant to go to nursing school. Basically they paid me for 40 hours a week, paid my tuition and books, and kept my benefits intact. I had to work 20 hours a week and go to school (and obviously make passing grades) The payback was i had to work there a year for every year they paid for after i graduated. i thought it was great. Full time pay, part time work and guaranteed job post graduation. I left several years after that and have regretted it ever since.
  13. by   DeeAngel
    You see very little of the actual work RNs do as a student nurse...

close