bodily fluids on you

  1. hi all...

    it's been a while since i've posted, but just thought of a good question. how do you prevent pts bodily fluids (spit, urine, blood, etc) from splashing on you or in your eye/mouth while you care for him/her. just curious to how you all handle this.. :uhoh21:
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  2. 19 Comments

  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    Since you are completing a CNA program, you should already know the answer. By using "PPE" (personal protective equipment}: gloves, masks, eyeglasses with sideshields, gowns/ aprons you can decrease the majority of patient bodily fluids from contaminating yourself.

    When I worked in the hospital, one part of patient assessment was to see if needed equipment in the room and bring back PPE to restock. Last med pass, I'd also check my rooms and restock for colleagues. In home health, make sure I carry extra gloves, gown, plastic grocery bags, wax paper, masks etc in my travel bag to wisk out at last minute. For those surprise coughs and mouth sprays, ya learn pretty quick to turn head away from source.
  4. by   sheliamd1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Since you are completing a CNA program, you should already know the answer. By using "PPE" (personal protective equipment}: gloves, masks, eyeglasses with sideshields, gowns/ aprons you can decrease the majority of patient bodily fluids from contaminating yourself.

    When I worked in the hospital, one part of patient assessment was to see if needed equipment in the room and bring back PPE to restock. Last med pass, I'd also check my rooms and restock for colleagues. In home health, make sure I carry extra gloves, gown, plastic grocery bags, wax paper, masks etc in my travel bag to wisk out at last minute. For those surprise coughs and mouth sprays, ya learn pretty quick to turn head away from source.
    can you just answer a question without attacking......did I SAY THAT I COMPLETED THE CNA PROGRAM?????????? THE BODY FLUIDS MAY HAVE GOTTEN THE BEST OF ME ...EVEN with protective gear. THANKS :angryfire
  5. by   nesher
    Learning to leap quickly is a great defense!
  6. by   allamericangirl
    Oooh... crabby day?

    Don't know what kind of CNA program you are in but in ours we had to make a minimum grade of 80% on the things we were taught in our classes and finish our classroom hours before having contact with PTs. If you are going to be in nursing you are going to come into contact with body fluids. When doing mouth or peri care wear gloves for certain. The gloves are for several reasons. 1. So you don't contaminate the PT. 2. So you don't come into contact with pathogins. 3. To stop the chain of infection and spread nasty things around. Gloves, masks, gowns, all depend on the situation.

    I have learned one thing in clinicals. I'm not going to buy some of those really cute nursing shoes that looklike mary janes with the strap over the ankle.

    On my last day of clinicals while giving a PT a shower, as helping her stand to get dressed I felt something heavy fall on my shoe. I looked down, and Oh My! It was 2 1/2 inches in diameter, round and golden brown. It was solid so it bounced right off my shoe. So glad I had on lace up atheletic shoes! Oh Dear! Poor thing! I felt so sorry for the PT. She was an Asian lady that didn't speak English, and she was so embarrassed. Had to clean her up all over again, but this time me too! Lysoled the shoes!

    Can't believe your instructor has you on the floor unprepared. For your own good, get out your book and read, read, read! Teach yourself everything you can, because it doesn't look like your instructor is.

    Quote from sheliadee1
    can you just answer a question without attacking......did I SAY THAT I COMPLETED THE CNA PROGRAM?????????? THE BODY FLUIDS MAY HAVE GOTTEN THE BEST OF ME ...EVEN with protective gear. THANKS :angryfire
    Last edit by allamericangirl on Mar 17, '05
  7. by   Sis123
    Leaping may be a great defense, but jumping to conclusions is always good exercise.

  8. by   antigone_eriksen
    I learned very quickly to keep my mouth shut when I suctioned vent patients. I was concentrating so hard on the timing of the suctioning that I left my mouth open. Patient coughed via ET tube and shot it perfectly into my mouth. thank god I didn't swallow! I've also had patients vomit on me and into my shoes. The best one can is use the protective equipment and scrupulous hygiene.
  9. by   totallytheresa
    I know what you're saying... even with masks, gloves, gowns, etc (which of course we don't always have to wear gown/masks unless on precautions), I'm always keeping that in my mind- to keep my mouth closed if possible and be prepared for any fluids that might come my way! Yikes! Of course it's not really possible to keep my mouth closed since I'm usually yapping!
    Quote from sheliadee1
    hi all...

    it's been a while since i've posted, but just thought of a good question. how do you prevent pts bodily fluids (spit, urine, blood, etc) from splashing on you or in your eye/mouth while you care for him/her. just curious to how you all handle this.. :uhoh21:
  10. by   Fiona59
    No matter how well prepared you are stuff still happens. I mean, how do you prepare for getting hit by fresh urine while attaching a catheter bag after inserting the catheter. Don't ask, it wasn't pretty, and I'm still not sure how it happens. And as for the poop hitting the shoe or ankle, well that the joys of nursing.


    Just keep a sense of humour, know where occupational health is (for eye flushes) and be sensible. I mean who knew that much could be inside 90lb little old ladies......
  11. by   LisaG21
    ewwww
  12. by   allamericangirl
    Fiona:
    Don't know how true it is, but we were taught in our classes that fresh urine is sterile. Even if it is, being hit with it has to be yucky. The poo on the shoe wasn't any big deal ... just surprising. I chalked it up to my initiaiton into nursing. The only thing that worries me is that the first time some yacks, I'm going with them. I have a triger happy gag reflex! LOL!

    Quote from Fiona59
    No matter how well prepared you are stuff still happens. I mean, how do you prepare for getting hit by fresh urine while attaching a catheter bag after inserting the catheter. Don't ask, it wasn't pretty, and I'm still not sure how it happens. And as for the poop hitting the shoe or ankle, well that the joys of nursing.


    Just keep a sense of humour, know where occupational health is (for eye flushes) and be sensible. I mean who knew that much could be inside 90lb little old ladies......
  13. by   begalli
    Quote from allamericangirl
    Don't know how true it is, but we were taught in our classes that fresh urine is sterile.
    Urine is sterile. However, if there is blood in the urine that's a whole other story if it comes in contact with an open wound you may have yourself or makes contact with mucous membranes.

    There are always "ifs."


    can you just answer a question without attacking......
    p.s. OP, I can't image NRSKarenRN "attacking" anyone. Her posts are always jammed packed with useful information. You'd be wisely advised to pay attention to them.
    Last edit by begalli on Mar 17, '05
  14. by   allamericangirl
    Thanks, begalli for confirming that urine is sterile, except when there is blood there. It's not that I didn't want to believe my instructor, but I had never heard tha before, so I appreciate the confirmation.

    Quote from begalli
    Urine is sterile. However, if there is blood in the urine that's a whole other story if it comes in contact with an open wound you may have yourself or makes contact with mucous membranes.

    There are always "ifs."



    p.s. OP, I can't image NRSKarenRN "attacking" anyone. Her posts are always jammed packed with useful information. You'd be wisely advised to pay attention to them.

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