BN vs. Diploma Program - page 2

Hi, We are three nursing students trying to find out what nurses views are on the BN program versus the Diploma program. We are hoping to get some replies, so that we can bring it up in discussion... Read More

  1. by   suzy253
    MLOS--hiya! remember me? Well, I did it, graduated, passed NCLEX and now an RN working a step-down telemetry unit. Loving it!!!
    are you still in the ER?
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    There are 2 diploma programs in Texas.. just if anyone is interested. I live to far away from either but it was my first choice.
  3. by   BSNtobe2009
    There are a couple of hospital based programs around my area that are not associated with a CC, so I am assuming that is what they call a diploma program.
  4. by   Altra
    Quote from suzy253
    MLOS--hiya! remember me? Well, I did it, graduated, passed NCLEX and now an RN working a step-down telemetry unit. Loving it!!!
    are you still in the ER?
    '

    A belated congrats to you, Suzy!! :hatparty: :caduceus:

    Still in the ER, and mostly loving it here too!! :wink2:
  5. by   irwin
    Hey there, Current Diploma student here. I seriously wouldn't want to be anywhere else, my school is right down the hall from the cafeteria in an Acuity hospital, we hit the ground running our second week of school charting vitals in the charts for AM vitals, data sheets, careplans, H&P you name it, and it's only midterm. I like it because we skip over the unnecessary and focous on what we need, we have 2 tests a week, one academic and one clinical, clinical lab, and then we go up to the floor 2 mins after the lab. I already know I will feel prepared, especially after the 3 month preceptorship in the department of my choosing, and the deal they have with the hospital which will allow me to be an aide on whatever department I plan to enter into. We have two hospitals, do psych at a nearby hospital, we will get tuition reinbursment if we sign on for 3 years at the partner hospital, plus the sign on bonus, and they will pay our way towards a BSN which will only take 2 semesters at the city university. Preparation, discipline, and an amazing life changing reward when im done, Im glad I got into my first choice school.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    i too, attended a 3 yr diploma program.
    but it has since closed down ( ) after a rich 100 yr history.
    i remember one time a nursing student's husband, who was an md, commented that our curriculum was "intense" and "did they expect us to be doctors?"
    but upon graduating, i indeed, hit the floor running, highly confident in everything i had learned.
    when interviewers heard that i graduated from this particular school of nsg, i was automatically presumed to have received a superior education.

    leslie
  7. by   nursekayt
    I am neither a diploma graduate or a BSN graduate originally. I am three courses away from receiving my BSN. I have a couple of thoughts on this topic. While I was in school for my ASN, I worked harder than I ever have. Honestly, I feel the BSN program I am in is just gladly taking my money, and not teaching me anything. The BSN is just a stepping stone for the MSN. I do think nursing needs to create one entry level and stick with it. Also, all RN's sit for the same boards and answer similar tough questions. So before people jump to conclusions about the superiority of the BSN prepared RN think about that. Some of the best nurses I have ever worked with, and only hope to be as great as, have a
    diploma.
    Last edit by nursekayt on Oct 14, '06 : Reason: incomplete first message
  8. by   studentnurses3
    Hi everyone, thanks for all the replies on this topic. Just wondering if any Canadian RN's have an opinion on this subject. Where the three of us are from, the Diploma program does not exist anymore. Since 1996, at our school anyone who had been enrolled in the program has graduated with a BN.
  9. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    <--------- Diploma grad here, too!!!! Made my new grad-RN transition reallly easy, since for 3 years I was in clinical!!!! My program was very strict, expected professionalism out of all of us, and we could miss 2 days total for the whole year, or we had to take a loa and come back next year, no matter what our grades were, didnt matter if your mother died.We had a charge clinical, where we took charge for 6 weeks straight. We literally had clinical from the first month we started school. 2 full days a week, 1 day at the nursing arts lab, 2 full days of theory. And, 60 credits towards a BSN at the college they had an articulation agreement with. Mine was the only diploma school in the state. Its over 100 yrs old.... there arent many of them around......but they still exist!!!!

    This sounds a lot more difficult than my ADN program...and we don't get nearly that much clinical time! I get to 'charge', once...maybe twice during this very last rotation.
  10. by   Alexsys
    Quote from RNOTODAY
    <--------- Diploma grad here, too!!!! Made my new grad-RN transition reallly easy, since for 3 years I was in clinical!!!! My program was very strict, expected professionalism out of all of us, and we could miss 2 days total for the whole year, or we had to take a loa and come back next year, no matter what our grades were, didnt matter if your mother died.We had a charge clinical, where we took charge for 6 weeks straight. We literally had clinical from the first month we started school. 2 full days a week, 1 day at the nursing arts lab, 2 full days of theory. And, 60 credits towards a BSN at the college they had an articulation agreement with. Mine was the only diploma school in the state. Its over 100 yrs old.... there arent many of them around......but they still exist!!!!
    Sounds just like the ADN program I was in.We got that much clinical time. Sometimes I was wishing that we didnt (I hate getting THAT early in the AM) You got written up if you were late to class after the teacher shut the door. Three write ups and you are out of the program. Yeah, it was like that at the school I went to
  11. by   nursekayt
    I have to ask how many Phd nurses are at the bedside? Doesn't it seem the higher your education, the further removed from the acutely ill patient one becomes. The diploma prepared nurse is truly a bedside nurse.
  12. by   lauralassie
    I graduated from a diploma program. We had all of the classes 4 year programs had. They got out summers, we went to school summers. We all take the same state boards. I've seen wounderful diploma nurses , adn, bsn nurses and I've seen really bad nurses from each of these as well. I really think it depends on the nurse, her detication and learning abilities. I do have to say our school was very strickt and had a 100 % passage rate on boards. There were many state schools that nearly lost accreditation due to failure rates on board exams. We started with about 100 students and graduated 30. They were very interested in "putting out a good nurse", not how much money they could collect from students. ( although, that is most-likely why they do not exsist now)Thought it was interesting that there is a state school here that now has "an intense program with max. clinical experience and requires a high ged to get in , it is their fast track, 3 year program -no summers off. "
    Last edit by lauralassie on Oct 17, '06
  13. by   ann945n
    I say we judge the persons performance and not their education level when compairing RN's to RN's. I think we would all agree the person makes the job, not the name of the degree

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