blood in syringe after injection

  1. 0
    We have started giving flu shots. I have done many. I have some that bleed and others that dont. I was wondering if anyone has seen this before. Pt was given flu shot in deltoid, aspirate and saw no blood, but when i pulled out needle it bleed and i went to use safety needle cover and saw blood in syringe and on needle tip. WHAT! Did this get administered wrong. If so will pt be ok. Pt felt fine, i doubled checked. What if any complications would there be, and how did this happen? I have given so many, with some that bleed quite a bit, but i never saw in syring, unless i never noticed that before. Any help would be great, so i can relax a bit. Thanks
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    It is just interstitial and capillary blood return. Don't worry about it.
    Jules A likes this.
  5. 0
    Don't sweat it. As long as you aspirated and no blood was noted when you did, you are fine. Some people bleed more than others.
  6. 1
    The CDC no longer recommends aspiration for vacinations. There is no evidence based research that has shown better outcomes with aspiration. So don't worry about it.
    Jules A likes this.
  7. 0
    If CDC no aspiration could the flu shot given incorrectly,... iv????
    OK thanks, although i have a general question. I do aspirate on my injections but i know some co workers dont on flu shots, since they say deltoid muscle is too big to miss. Ok so lets say that person did not aspirate and they injected into vein on a flu shot ...What would happen. I mean i know i did aspirate, but now i am second guessing if i did for long enough and what if i didnt and it did go to vein. Thanks for more info
  8. 1
    This is my thinking on this subject...say that you gave an IM injection and upon aspiration you had a little blood return. I would think that the chances of the entire dose of medication entering the vein would be very slim if nonexistent since the angle of the needle would be 90 degrees to the vein. This would be much different than doing an IV injection.

    The CDC stopped recommending aspiration due to a lack of data documenting the necessity of this procedure. This is probably primarily due to the conventional teaching to aspirate all IM injections. I think you should do what you feel comfortable with. Just because there is no data showing a need to aspirate available now doesn't mean that in 10 years it will be the same...especially since more and more nurses are not performing aspirations.

    That being said I and many nurses I know have never aspirated blood when giving an IM shot.
    Jules A likes this.
  9. 0
    A difference needs to be made between vaccinations and other IM shots. The CDC no longer recommends aspiration for vaccinations, however, other IM's such as narcotics, anti-psychotics should still be aspirated.
  10. 0
    Quote from ukstudent
    A difference needs to be made between vaccinations and other IM shots. The CDC no longer recommends aspiration for vaccinations, however, other IM's such as narcotics, anti-psychotics should still be aspirated.
    As I've said before I agree but good luck with that when you are struggling with a wildly psychotic patient.


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