Blending Chiropractic and NP

  1. 0
    Hey,

    I'm a young practicing chiropractor that is thinking of starting a nursing degree, with aspirations towards being a nurse practitioner. While I love chiropractic, I would like to expand how I can treat patients by blending it with more traditional medicine. I believe that great things can be accomplished with proper diet, rehab, and correcting imbalances, but I also understand the need for some medications and interventions.

    Using the almighty search function, I found this great thread already... http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...ng-497155.html

    And was wondering if anyone on the board that holds both degrees has successfully blended both disciplines. My dream is to work in a hospital part time, and also in a private, sports injury practice. The hospital will keep me interested with patients constant varying conditions, and private practice will keep me rooted in musculoskeletal. I like having the ability to diagnose and come up with my own treatment plans.

    Do you think I am going the proper route? Any insight and advice about your experiences with/as a nurse practitioner is appreciated

    Loque
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  4. 3 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Your approach sounds balanced. So far in my ADN training, nutrition and exercise seem to be getting glossed over in favor of meds. Alternative therapies and wholistic approaches get mentioned in passing, then every possible drug or surgical intervention gets dwelled on. Good luck with your goals.
  6. 0
    I live in rural Southern Oregon. We have a local Chiropractor who is interested in using me in his practice. He is not familiar with possible job descriptions for RNs working in Chiropractic settings. I am surprise at the lack of success I am having finding either Nurses who work for Chiropractors or job descriptions. Any ideas or information would be appreciated. THANKS
  7. 1
    Quote from Loque
    Hey,

    I'm a young practicing chiropractor that is thinking of starting a nursing degree, with aspirations towards being a nurse practitioner. While I love chiropractic, I would like to expand how I can treat patients by blending it with more traditional medicine. I believe that great things can be accomplished with proper diet, rehab, and correcting imbalances, but I also understand the need for some medications and interventions.

    Using the almighty search function, I found this great thread already... http://allnurses.com/general-nursing...ng-497155.html

    And was wondering if anyone on the board that holds both degrees has successfully blended both disciplines. My dream is to work in a hospital part time, and also in a private, sports injury practice. The hospital will keep me interested with patients constant varying conditions, and private practice will keep me rooted in musculoskeletal. I like having the ability to diagnose and come up with my own treatment plans.

    Do you think I am going the proper route? Any insight and advice about your experiences with/as a nurse practitioner is appreciated

    Loque
    The thread you posted already gave you a lot of useful information. Maybe it was mentioned in that thread already but one thing to realize is that NP autonomy is state-specific with variations in scope of practice depending on which state you are practicing at. There are independent practice states for NP's and currently they are: DC, AK, AZ, CO, DC, HI, IA, ID, MD, ME, MT, ND, NM, OR, RI, UT, VT, WA, and WY. I feel that if your goal is to practice as an independent provider blending your musculoskeletal health background with the traditional health care provider role that you learn in NP school, your best bet is to practice in those states. Otherwise, you are going to be bound by practice restrictions such as having to collaborate with an existing physician-based practice, or even needing a supervising physician. The other piece is choosing an NP program that will suit your goal. It seems reasonable that the FNP route would be your best bet as it focuses on primary care across the lifespan, something you'll likely need in private out-patient practice. This, however, may limit your chances in being able to care for high acuity patients in hospitals depending on state regulations you'll fall under.
    GrnTea likes this.


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