Binge Drinking - page 3

The "official definition" of Binge drinking is 5 drinks in a row for men and 4 drinks in a row (during a single drinking session) for a woman. Some people think that this "over identifies" problem... Read More

  1. by   thisnurse
    i strongly disagree with you. nursing is a profession, not a life style.
  2. by   ohbet
    Yes,nursing is a profession,not a lifesyle,but what we owe to our patients we our to ourselves
  3. by   thisnurse
    i give my patients all of myself while they are in my care. the emphasis being on care. when my shift is over its over.i am not willing to be a living example for anyone other than my children. i owe my patients nothing.
  4. by   Q.
    How does this standard apply to nurses who don't work at the bedside? Do they need to set an example as well?

    And thisnurse, LOVE the statement about Slick Willy. What IF he were a nurse? Would he still be able to cheat on his wife, lie to the world, and get blow jobs on the job??
  5. by   semstr
    What b...s..t!

    I am one unethical, smoking, drinking, having a active sexlife nurse! ROFLMAO
    But since I do all of the above in my private time and not in front of my patients, so what?

    Keep it on, Renee
  6. by   kewlnurse
    So bangin a med student/intern in her sleeping area would be unethical, but going back to her dorm would be ok?
  7. by   prn nurse
    since you received the phone call fromm the pushy MADD fundraiser....I would suggest phoning your local MADD office and reporting it. That is absolutely/definitely not their corporate style. MADD is a class act all the way down the line and it would be a shame to allow one person to mar their image. MADD would never tolerate anyone representing them in this manner. I have never even known of a MADD fundraiser. Most of their funds come from victim's families and corporations.
  8. by   thisnurse
    been way too many years now prn. i never forgot it tho

    kewl...yes thats right.

    can you imagine if politicians had to live by the same set of "standards" we do (are supposed to) and were held to them...like we are...who would run the country?

    if i wanted to be a nun, i would have joined a convent.
  9. by   ohbet
    I think it would be helpful to clarify what standards we are talking about.

    1. THE LEGAL STANDARD:Legally,a nurse,after her/his shift,can go home,consume any quantity of alcohol she/he chooses to,as long as they are not impaired on the job. Legally she/he can eat till he/she pukes their guts out,as long as they are not impaired on the job. Legally she/he can smoke cigarettes until they become COPDers ,as long as they are not impaired on the job.


    2.THE ETHICAL STANDARD:Ethically,a nurse would be behaving in an unethical manner if he/she drank more than what is considered mod. drinking or eating more than is considered healthy or smoking at all. The basis for this lies in the "Code of Ethicis for Nurses with Interpretive statements" which reads "Moral respect accords moral worth and dignity to all human beings irrespective of their personal attributes or life situation . Such respect extends to one self as well; the same duties that we owe to others we owe to ourselves." see 5.1 Moral self-respect in the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Standards.

    So what the above ethical standard is saying is that since a nurse wouldnt tell patients to drink immoderately,eat immoderately or smoke cigarrettes because its risky behavior,then he/she ,ethically,should not engage in those behaviors.

    Its a distinction bet/ the legal standard and the ethical standard.

    See the difference? There is a difference bet/ legality and ethics.

    I hope this helps. God bless,if thats appropriate.
  10. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by ohbet
    Interpreted by the ANA,in "The code of ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements,5.1 Moral Self-respect:Moral respect accords moral worth and dignity to all human beings irrespective of their personal attributes or life situation. Such respect extends to oneself as well; the same duties that we owe to ohers we owe to ourselves."
    Based on that statement made by the ANA,we wouldnt tell our patients to drink 4 to 5 alcoholic drinks regularly,therefore,we would not do that ourselves as nurses,hence a nurse that drinks 4 to 5 alcoholic drinks regularly is acting unethically.
    Hell, we need to just revoke the license of over half all nurses. I, personally, binge eat and binge smoke. I'm no drinker, but if it has no influence on one's job, it isn't the ANA or anyone else's business what anyone is doing in their OWN time. Most everyone has some type "unhealthy" vice. Some drink, some smoke, some eat, some have unprotected/multiple sex partners, some drive w/o seat belts, some ride bikes w/o helments, some don't brush their teeth TID, some don't drink 8-10 glasses of H20 daily, some abuse their spouse/kids, some don't clean their homes....you get the picture? That's complete BS!!!!

    get a life!
  11. by   nurs4kids
    Prn,
    On another thread you complained over the gov'ts regulation of seat belts, littering and other common laws. Which way do you want it? You don't want the gov't to enforce common sense laws, but you want the nursing profession to mandate how I live the few hours I'm granted AWAY from work???

    Ever researched how many animals are killed from litter thrown on the roads? The little celephane (sp?) wrappers from cigs kills birds, the cig butts kills birds. If the law doesn't mandate seat belts, then some idiot parent allows their 12 yr old to fly through a car window....

    I really don't understand your views.
    tracy
  12. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by ohbet



    2.THE ETHICAL STANDARD:Ethically,a nurse would be behaving in an unethical manner if he/she drank more than what is considered mod. drinking or eating more than is considered healthy or smoking at all. The basis for this lies in the "Code of Ethicis for Nurses with Interpretive statements" which reads "Moral respect accords moral worth and dignity to all human beings irrespective of their personal attributes or life situation . Such respect extends to one self as well; the same duties that we owe to others we owe to ourselves." see 5.1 Moral self-respect in the Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Standards.
    never heard anyone quote this when a nurse is being FORCED to work that second shift... isn't that "unhealthy"??
  13. by   NRSKarenRN
    fact sheet on alcohol problems
    http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org.../factsheet.htm

    types of alcohol problems:

    alcohol use disorders include alcohol dependence (known as alcoholism) and alcohol abuse.1
    alcohol abuse is characterized by clinically significant impairment or distress but does not entail physical dependence.2
    alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is characterized by impaired control over drinking, tolerance, withdrawal syndrome when alcohol is removed, neglect of normal activities for drinking, and continued drinking despite recurrent related physical or psychological problems.3
    risky drinking includes drinking beyond moderate levels either on a regular basis or on a particular occasion.4

    who has an alcohol problem?

    nearly 14 million americans meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders.5
    approximately one-half of us adults report family history of alcoholism or problem drinking.6
    an estimated 74% of current male drinkers and 72% of current female drinkers aged 21 and older at least once a year exceed guidelines for low risk drinking. 7
    more than 18% of americans experience alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence at some time in their lives.8


    how can i recognize an alcohol problem?


    drinking to calm nerves, forget worries or to boost a sad mood.
    guilt about drinking.
    unsuccessful attempts to cut down/stop drinking.
    lying about or hiding drinking habits.
    causing harm to oneself or someone else as a result of drinking.
    needing to drink increasingly greater amounts in order to achieve desired effect.
    feeling irritable, resentful or unreasonable when not drinking.
    medical, social, family, or financial problems caused by drinking.9

    harmful effects of alcohol

    heavy drinking raises the risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, certain cancers, accidents, violence, suicides, birth defects and overall mortality.10
    economic costs to society are estimated at $185 billion annually for 1998.11
    harmful and hazardous drinking is involved in about one-third of suicides, one-half of homicides, and one-third of child abuse cases.12
    alcohol is involved in a large proportion of unintentional deaths from falls, burns, and drownings.13

    women and alcohol problems

    women overall drink less than men but are more likely to experience adverse consequences including damage to the heart muscle, liver, and brain trauma resulting from auto crashes, interpersonal violence, and death.14, 15
    the progression of alcohol abuse and alcoholism is usually faster in women than in men.16
    researchers have identified no safe threshold for drinking during pregnancy.17

    drinking among teens and college students


    in 1999, 44% of college students reported binge drinking (consuming 5 or more drinks in a row for males or 4 or more drinks in a row for females during the past two weeks); nearly 23% of college students reported frequent binge drinking (bingeing three or more times in a two-week period).18
    the rate of binge drinking among fraternity and sorority members is considerably higher: 65% in 1999. among those living in a fraternity or sorority house, the rate of binge drinking is still higher (79%), though lower than in 1997 (82%). 19
    among college students who consumed alcohol, more than 47% in 1999 reported drinking to get drunk (compared with 40% in 1993 and 52% in 1997).20 - young persons who begin drinking before age 13 are four times as likely to develop alcohol dependence and twice as likely to develop alcohol abuse as those who begin drinking at age 21.21
    more than 41% of high school seniors perceive no great risk in consuming four to five drinks nearly every day.22
    approximately 22% of 8th graders, 41% of 10th graders, and 50% of 12th graders report having consumed alcohol during the past month.23
    about 8% of 8th, 23% of 10th, and 32% of 12th graders report having been drunk during the past month.24
    about 14% of 8th, 26% of 10th, and 30% of 12th graders report binge drinking during the past two weeks.25
    alcohol is frequently a factor in the three leading causes of death (motor vehicle crashes, homicides, and suicides) for 15 to 24 year olds.26,27


    national alcohol screening day is april 11, 2002

    ------------------------------------------------------
    1/17/02
    new program helps screen for alcohol problems and at-risk drinking
    http://www.nursingworld.org/news/ana...tm#nasd1/17/02

    national alcohol screening day (nasd), a program of screening for mental health (smh), has created an easy and free way to screen for alcohol problems and at-risk drinking . the nasd materials can be used in two different ways. nurses are invited to either conduct a special outreach event on national alcohol screening day, april 11, or, as a second option, nurses may want to incorporate the screenings into their day-to-day procedures and screen regularly scheduled patients or clients.

    registered providers receive a kit of ready-to-use education and screening materials, including brochures, educational flyers, and screening forms. sites also receive step-by-step instructions for planning and conducting a screening event. to register for nasd, call screening for mental health at 781-239-0071 or download a registration form at www.mentalhealthscreening.org/nasd/ana . for those who plan to conduct a special community outreach and education event and would like videos and a lecture, download the general site form. for those who plan, instead, to screen their regularly scheduled patients and would like a kit that includes more medical information, download the primary care registration form.

    national alcohol screening day information
    http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org/alcohol.htm

    frequently asked questions (faq):
    http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org...ol/alc-faq.htm
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Feb 2, '02

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Binge Drinking