being a nurse and patient and getting crap for it from healthcare workers

  1. I just read a bunch of sad stories about bad care provided to patients who are nurses. But my topic is a bit different. Have you nurses ever felt like the doctors and nurses who provided your care felt threatened by your knowledge? I know I have had a doctor basically tell me that I did not know what I was talking about because I was only a student nurse. I was the patient here. Whatever happened to listening to the patients story? Doesnt the patient typically have more insight into an illness especially if they have this specialty knowledge that healthcare workers have?
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   Audreyfay
    IMO, a Dr or Nurse, or any healthcare provider needs to listen to their patient, even if they don't think they're right. Many times they can provide crucial information. I like to think of myself as working with a team, that includes my healthcare team and me. I am the director of my care. If things are not going right, it's time to contract a different team.
    Yes, some feel threatened by others knowledge. I like to level with them about what I know and don't know. I'm sorry you have gone through a difficult time. Hopefully it will get better. Take care.
  4. by   redhd5
    This is so ironic--this week I had a patient who's daughter is studying to be a PA. I work in LTC. Her mom is my patient, and had heart surgery. The daughter dictates the care to the doctor. She wanted tests done that weren't necessary, and we did them and everything turned out to be within normal limits. This daughter is having a hard time letting someone else take care of her mom. Her mom is geriatric. I called the doctor's office who had ordered an antibiotic, to have it stopped because it wasn't needed and he wanted to go ahead and give it because he was afraid of the daughter. I held it and spoke with the daughter, who agreed not to have it given. Can you imagine??? The patient's health is at stake here! Anyhow, I managed, after three days, to establish rapport with the daughter, so I think everything will turn out fine.
    This isn't the first time I have had a family member in the health care field intimidate the doctor. Fortunately, whenever I have been a patient, I haven taken pains to establish a good relationship with my doctor or nurse, to make sure we get along okay, so I was intimidating. Mostly, I don't want them to know I am a nurse. I think it just adds extra stress to an already stressed out health care provider, when I am the patient.
  5. by   Disablednurse
    I have had doctors on both ends of the spectrum, where one always wanted to do whatever I said to do and the other end where the doctor did not even listen to what I was telling him. Fortunately I now have a doctor who doesn't mind being the doctor, he always picks at me and asks me "Is that OK?" when he orders something for me because he knows I am a nurse and laughs when I tell him that he is the doctor.
  6. by   hogan4736
    This is just me...

    I never let on that I am an RN whether I'm in the Dr's office or the hospital. I prefer to be just a patient (or just a husband, when my wife was giving birth to our sons )

    Now if I received bad care (doc or nursing) I would say something.

    I work in a walk in clinic and do triage/intake on over 100 patients in a shift. I always begin the triage with "how can we help you today" or "what brings you in today?"
    Sometimes the FIRST thing a (nurse) patient will say is "I'm a nurse." My response is ALWAYS (with a smile): "So am I, what seems to be the medical problem today?"

    my point?
    being a nurse (or doc, or CNA, etc.) has no bearing on your visit/hospital stay. If it comes up in conversation, then so be it. BUT DON'T THROW IT IN MY FACE!

    stepping off my soapbox...
    Last edit by hogan4736 on May 18, '03
  7. by   New CCU RN
    Originally posted by hogan4736
    This is just me...

    I never let on that I am an RN whether I'm in the Dr's office or the hospital. I prefer to be just a patient (or just a husband, when my wife was giving birth to our sons )

    Now if I received bad care (doc or nursing) I would say something.

    I work in a walk in clinic and do triage/intake on over 100 patients in a shift. I always begin the triage with "how can we help you today" or "what brings you in today?"
    Sometimes the FIRST thing a (nurse) patient will say is "I'm a nurse." My response is ALWAYS (with a smile): "So am I, what seems to be the medical problem today?"

    my point?
    being a nurse (or doc, or CNA, etc.) has no bearing on your visit/hospital stay. If it comes up in conversation, then so be it. BUT DON'T THROW IT IN MY FACE!

    stepping off my soapbox...
    I fully agree with you. Personally, I never let on being a nurse. I have never really had any major health problems, only really see the doc for routine stuff, and I have never been hospitalized.

    However, I listen as if I were a patient, question in a way to not sound like I know it all (b/c I don't), and keep an observant eye out.

    It always makes me a little nervous when I know I am taking care of a nurse or doc....dunno why. I usually get right over it, but it can be a little intimidating at times....
  8. by   MandyInMS
    I'm in fairly good health (knocks on wood..lol) so I haven't had to deal with this personally.But on several occasions when visiting a family member in the hospital my grandmother for example..always blurts out "this is my grand-daughter..she's a nurse" and I'm always like shhhhhhhh Granny...lol..I don't think we as nurses expect 'special' care for ourselves or our family...just proper care..I must admit I'm a little intimidated by a nurse pt or family of a nurse...I'm an excellent nurse but, seems like you are 'under a microscope' and feel the other nurse is watching your every move....lol...I personally would rather not even know a pt /family member is a nurse, because they will get the same care reguardless..and save me the added stress
  9. by   nadia562002
    I never said that I think I deserve special treatment for being a nurse. Its just that I have had a certain doctor belittle me as a patient. She would not respect my thoughts at all either. I finally found a doc who does respect my thoughts. Aside from being a nurse, I feel that all healthcare workers should listen to their patients rather then discounting them as knowing nothing.
  10. by   Disablednurse
    My problem was I never had to say that I was a nurse to any doctor that I went to because I worked in the local nursing home in a small town and all the doctors knew me from work. It was impossible to be incognito in a small town.
  11. by   nrw350
    Could some doctors be nervous of their patient being a healthcare worker becaue they know in the back of their heads that they can not make something sound as though it is one way, when in fact it is not..... and their healthcare patient catch on to it? This is just a conspiracy theory type of thought. I think I am becoming more and mroe paranoid everyday lol.
  12. by   hogan4736
    nadia,
    no implication from me that you were looking for special treatment...

    just sharing a peeve of mine that came to mind w/ your post...



    my point has always been, that all patients should be treated the same, and throwing it (that one is a nurse/doc) out there for all to hear, smacks of wanting special treatment...

    sean
    Last edit by hogan4736 on May 19, '03
  13. by   altomga
    I don't "inform" the nurse/doctor I am a nurse, but when they do the admission record you tell them your occupation...from there it get's passed on to the other staff. Sometimes I think that "us" nurses think that "us" the pt will judge how their care is given....I don't want special treament...simply take good care of me period!! I go out of my way to not bother the nurses b/c I know how it feels...
  14. by   hogan4736
    i always write "self employed" in the occupation blank

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