being a nurse and patient and getting crap for it from healthcare workers - page 2

I just read a bunch of sad stories about bad care provided to patients who are nurses. But my topic is a bit different. Have you nurses ever felt like the doctors and nurses who provided your care... Read More

  1. by   jadednurse
    I find myself wanting to tell other that I'm a nurse - not because I'm looking for special treatment but because I want healthcare professionals to talk to me in our "common language." I've found that communication seems to be alot easier when they understand I speak the same language!
  2. by   duckie
    I think frequently doctors go along with what the family wants because they know eveyone is lawsuit happy anymore and they figure if they don't and something happens they'll be taken to the cleaners in court. Let's face it, all doctors and nurses are human, we make mistakes and in any other business making mistakes isn't as critical as when you're in the medical profession. They figure if they give the "know it all" family member what they want, there's less chance of a lawsuit. I hate it when family members tell me how to do my job and act like they know more than I do just because they are a member of the medical profession. Yes, perhaps they are higher educated, but in many cases, finding the proper DX is a matter of elimination of what isn't wrong with the person. I think anyone that feels the need to tell you right up front that they are a nurse, doctor or whatever, is trying to make you feel uncomfortable and trying to make certain that you "jump through hoops" to do everything perfect for their family member and many times they feel that they will be placed on a higher priority level if you know you're dealing with a healthcare worker. I have always felt a person should receive care based on their needs and who has a more important need, such as, before I will move someone's table two inches to the left, I will take someone to the toilet. Or before I would toilet someone I would pick a resident up from the floor. I'm not going to let someone lay on the floor because a nurse wants her table moved 2 inches, priority rules in my opinion. What a person does for a living should not give them priority in the care they receive, the needs of the patient should be the determining factor. I prefer people not know I'm a nurse, I just want them to do their job and provide me the care I need or my loved one needs. What I do for a living should not rate me special care. Now there are times when a person states they are a nurse and have made certain observations that maybe a nonprofessional person would not have made but you can still pass on the information without announcing a title. In LTC we do get to know family members and it is much easier to find out their professions since we have more frequent contact with the family members. But if you work in a hospital and someone says, "My name is------and I'm a nurse and this is what is wrong with me, and this is what I want," that to me would be very annoying. Many times tests that are very expensive are ordered because a family member demanded it and it has nothing to do with what the actual DX is and the MD may have never even considered ordering it, but did simply because it was demanded by someone. I can understand how doctors would feel very threatened and concerned not to do what someone demands, that's why the cost of insurances are so high, everyone wants a lawsuit that will set them up for life.
  3. by   jadednurse
    Duckie, don't hold back, tell us how you really feel! JK.

    I've been in frustrating situations similar to those you have described, so I understand where you are coming from. But as my previous post explains, I bring up the fact that I'm a nurse not because I want to be treated "better" but because I want them to understand that my knowledge base and ability to understand the lingo is similar and can often help in communicating information. That said, I think it's also important how you bring the subject up...certainly coming across as pushy or a know-it-all isn't going to make communication any easier.
  4. by   duckie
    Originally posted by jadednurse
    Duckie, don't hold back, tell us how you really feel! JK.

    I've been in frustrating situations similar to those you have described, so I understand where you are coming from. But as my previous post explains, I bring up the fact that I'm a nurse not because I want to be treated "better" but because I want them to understand that my knowledge base and ability to understand the lingo is similar and can often help in communicating information. That said, I think it's also important how you bring the subject up...certainly coming across as pushy or a know-it-all isn't going to make communication any easier.

    If anything I said offended you, please know it was not meant to but I was reacting based on many experiences I have encountered while dealing with families of residents in my LTC employment. Specifically, a time that immediately comes to mind was a BSN that just came right out and told me that I should not be a charge nurse because I was "only an LPN," her words, not mine, and this occurred after her meeting me for only five minutes. I have been a charge nurse for many years and work very hard to give equal treatment to all, based on need priority. Even her family was horrified at her treatment to me. As with anything there is no way to handle this that applies to all situations. Actually there are times when I find it good that a family member is a nurse, they often will control other family members that tend to get a bit out of control in their demands. I would never have offended you for anything and if I did, I am very sorry. I also have a problem with residents that are rich and expect special treatment. I have, in the past, had others employees imply that a certain person should receive special treatment because of their financial status. I always tell them, their wealth does not rate them better treatment that a poor person gets. Again, if I offended you, I am very sorry, it was not intended to do so. Please forgive......Duckie....also, you do not strike me from your posts as the kind of person I was referring to!
  5. by   live4today
    Originally posted by hogan4736
    This is just me...

    I never let on that I am an RN whether I'm in the Dr's office or the hospital. I prefer to be just a patient (or just a husband, when my wife was giving birth to our sons )
    My thoughts exactly! My being a nurse only comes out when the situation calls for it. Otherwise, I'm the patient when I'm the one seeking health treatment from a doctor or receiving treatment in a hospital from any healthcare worker.
  6. by   LaVorneRN
    During our hospitalization I preferred no onw knew I was a new grad but while unconscious my family informed the staff. Once awake I realized we were treated with great and special care(in the Lake Charles hospital). The circumstances were pretty sad to begin with (see previous posts on our wreck and situation). But I never expected special treatment. I was treated with respect until we were moved to 2 other hospitals. I realized it was agood thing I had knowledge and wasn't afraid to question things concerning the both of us.
    I agree that regardless of your occupation your M.D., nurses should not just listen but also respect you.
  7. by   jadednurse
    Oh .Duckie, you didn't offend me at all. On the contrary, I appreciate your passion for the issue. As I mentioned, I understand where you're coming from
  8. by   askater11
    I've taken care of Dr.'s...R.N.'s and other hospital personalle.

    A couple of the Dr.'s I cared for were some of the most anal Dr.'s. I thought I was in for a long day. But hey they weren't too bad as patients.

    I took care of one nurse that had her Phd. She was telling me about these studies they did...and asked me to alter all her I.V.'s secondary to the studies they'd done. I did...but I looked up info. and no studies support her "study".

    Now the worst case was 2 weeks ago. This lady said she was a nurse...don't know what kind. She was the patience daughter...I could do no right. And I'm the kind of nurse that always gets "good" compliments. It was a bad day I could go on about it.

    All and all I love taking care of other fellow medical colleagues and their family.

    As a patient I tell them I'm a nurse. Only because they don't have to break down and explain everything in such simplicity. I like knowing when patients/family are in the medical field...again it helps regarding breaking down things so simplitically.

    I've had good experiences while having my babies. Though I will say I enjoy nurses/Dr.'s with outgoing personalities that talk with their patient. My second birth the birthing/post C-section nurses...rarely talked to me. Only to ask me the bare question her or there....I never felt they whole heartedly cared about me...
  9. by   Furball
    Most nurses I've taken care of were great! They know what a typical shift is like and they would only complain if it were a legit gripe....and even then were gracious. I love taking care of nurses!
  10. by   CCL"Babe"
    We have to use "in system" physicians and hospitals in order to be covered for insurance. Usually I don't say I'm a nurse, but after 23 years in the same system, I know a lot of the staff. When I was admitted a few years ago they put a sign up in the nurses station not to talk about the ER since I was in the room next door. The ironic thing was, I had had a verbal altercation with one of the nurses on that unit earlier that day about bringing up an ER admit.
  11. by   LMK
    26 years ago, I was pregnant with our first baby, a girl, I began to bleed in the 6th month. Was admitted to hospital labor room & observed. Ultrasound showed placenta previa! Moved to gyn floor for bed rest etc. Unfortunately, my OB told staff I was a RN. My specialty was med-surg not OB. We had tried for 2 years to get pregnant, now we were fightened and I was being treated by floor nurses like an intruder! 3 days after initial admission, I hemorraged in rest room. When I called for help, no one came, I was told over the intercom that I was overreacting! My roommates husband, God Bless him, went to the nurses station and almost dragged the charge nurse into the room. I had managed to get back to bed on my own. Upon exam they found the cord prolapsed-I was rushed to L&D and lost our baby that night! I swore then that I would NEVER ever again tell hospital staff that I am a nurse unless I am NOT the patient! I advocate better for others than I do for myself. My husband & I were treated poorly. I even refused blood transfusions with an 8 hgb. because I wanted to get out as soon as possible! In 1979 we finally became the parents of a wonderful baby boy. He is 24 years old and the best son anyone could ask for! Could never carry another pregnancy to term after our son! So in the end we have been truly blessed!
  12. by   nrw350
    Dear God! LMK That is absolutely horrible to think that things like this has happened in the past. I would think that having a nurse or doctor as a patient would be a little easier for the staff in that, they would know not to call for unimportant things! I would have sued the hospital for mal-practice after loosing your child. I truly feel sorry for you.
  13. by   Furball
    LMK, I am speechless with horror. I'm so very sorry they treated you that way....and lost your chid....what a nightmare.

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