Bed Baths, I dread giving them. - page 6

OK, so now I'm going to split my 0.6 FTE on our small rural hospital 6 bed CCU/Stepdown unit half and half, 12 hour days and 12 hour nights, since some rare weekday dayshifts opened up. I'm keeping... Read More

  1. by   darrell
    Quote from mauxtav8r
    This is the key: Place like 5-8 washcloths in the prepared water in the basin
    Another tip: thick creams like Calazyme become a bit more tractable when the tube is left in warm-to-hot water for a couple of minutes before use...
  2. by   darrell
    Quote from Tweety
    On people with very dry skin I sometimes put a little lotion on the wet wash cloth, but haven't tried putting it in the water.
    I did this with a foot soak for a patient with very dry feet. I would follow it with a nutrient cream after a ten-minute soak. Over the course of four days, the improvement was impressive. Of course, it could have been just the after-bath application or just that he hadn't been doing anything before this care, so I can't support the technique well. It's the only time I've tried it but I'd try again based on this incident.
  3. by   babes690
    Quote from elizabeth321
    I can't believe that a nurse of any kind is asking how to do a bed bath? am I missing something?

    Liz

    i am a newly qualified RGn in England and i must say that although i can see the assessment oppertunities in giving my residents (i work in a nursing home) a bed bath i do not always have the time (there are 28 reidents and 1 nurse i also have 4 carers to help) as the morning med round takes nerarly 3 hours! i too dread giving a bed bath especially to the terminal residents that we have as i fear hurting them or not doing as they would wish and they may not be able to communicate that with me.

    as a student i spent a lot of time with our NA's at the local hosopital and they were great, my advice would be to work with one of them for the first few days and see how they do it.

    good look
  4. by   darrell
    Quote from clemmm78
    ... And, having to give bedbaths does *not* imply that we must give one every day - I don't know where that comes from. ...
    I work in acute (respiratory floor as a tech - I'm a student) and we are required to bath each patient daily on the day shift unless they refuse. Each tech normally gets 11 patients and perhaps half these are total care on an average day. In other words, bed baths instead of just set-ups.

    Personally, I shower every day when I get up and again after work in case I've got any hitchhikers trying to colonize my skin. My wife is immuno-compromized because of Embrol (RA), so this is more than an affectation. I like being clean and I have to assume the patients do, too. Those who prefer not to bath daily I will work with, but the nurses require an explaination if I skip anyone. Also, to me, dirty patients just seem out of place in a hospital....

    I don't scrub people with soap if they don't have visible grime. I use a gentler cleanser, I use location and I dry throughly. Mostly I'm after salt and sweat, food, feces and urine. I've also reported many, many new Stage I sites in time for early intervention!

    I'm learning a lot from this thread about how the procedures differ by location. Thank you to everyone contributing!
  5. by   RyanRN
    Thoughts:

    Team up with CNA or another RN from your unit - do her pt., then yours! Helps with the 'uneasy factor" and gets the job done quick.


    For best 'best' hints - ask an experienced/helpful CNA - their knowledge is priceless.

    Families *love* when their relative and linen are clean and sparkling.

    Some patients (my mother) never wanted "someone washing her", she was an elderly, private person, and embarrassed. Give them the opportunity to do what they can themselves - I've seen some just run in, take over, and railroad the patient - mainly because of time factor.. Not good - or kind.

    Truth is sometimes it's just not a "priority", esp. in ICU. Do the best you can when you can.

    Not often - there are patients that truly need a CAR WASH (always tried to come up with some gagit that would do that - and make me a million bucks! Never happened.

    Good luck - all things become easier - the more you do it!!!
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Also if the resident or pt. loved to have a touch of perfume, i would spray it very close in a dry washcloth, and dab on the pt. Spraying in the washcloth kept the mist from traveling on everywhere and everrything, plus it was away to apply it sparingly.
  7. by   GoldenFire5
    These are great tips, thank you.

    Do you give a bed bath to a patient who is physically able to bathe themselves? Or do you give them supplies and privacy?

    Such a basic question, I know. I've given bed baths to patients who were physically able to do it - but now I wonder if I did the right thing?
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from Meloney
    These are great tips, thank you.

    Do you give a bed bath to a patient who is physically able to bathe themselves? Or do you give them supplies and privacy?

    Such a basic question, I know. I've given bed baths to patients who were physically able to do it - but now I wonder if I did the right thing?
    I asked the pt.

    Most that could do this themselves just needed help reaching their back.
  9. by   clemmm78
    Quote from Meloney
    These are great tips, thank you.

    Do you give a bed bath to a patient who is physically able to bathe themselves? Or do you give them supplies and privacy?

    Such a basic question, I know. I've given bed baths to patients who were physically able to do it - but now I wonder if I did the right thing?

    I can't think of a reason why I'd give a bedbath to a pt who is able to do so on his or her own. I would provide the equipment and pop in to see if he or she wanted help reaching the back, but otherwise, that's not an appropriate use of my time. And, it is entirely possible that by doing the bedbath for them, you are taking away the last of their independance.
  10. by   hecete
    i agree, bath time is a great assessment time. we have a bath cna, she gives showers 2x aweek. our wound care pts. have a whirlpool 2x a week. all pts. trach, pegs, piccs receive a shower at least once a week. if they refuse, we contact their poa, unless they are their own rp, usuallt that solves the bath dilemma.
  11. by   elizabeth321
    Quote from hecete
    i agree, bath time is a great assessment time. we have a bath cna, she gives showers 2x aweek. our wound care pts. have a whirlpool 2x a week. all pts. trach, pegs, piccs receive a shower at least once a week. if they refuse, we contact their poa, unless they are their own rp, usuallt that solves the bath dilemma.
    are you saying that you would threaten to envoke a personal directive based on the fact that someone does not want a bath or shower?

    liz
  12. by   hecete
    YES, THIS IS OUR POLICY. IF ANY RX, MED .ETC. IS REFUSED, THE POA OR RP IS CONTACTED. THIS IS THE POLICY IF MY FACILITY
  13. by   elizabeth321
    Quote from hecete
    YES, THIS IS OUR POLICY. IF ANY RX, MED .ETC. IS REFUSED, THE POA OR RP IS CONTACTED. THIS IS THE POLICY IF MY FACILITY
    Are all your patients considered incompetent?

    Liz

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