Becoming a Student Nurse

  1. hi, all! i actually posted this sunday but it was suggested that i move it here. thx!



    hi, everyone!

    happy sunday! i'm not a nurse but have been following your board and i'm very interested in entering a nursing program. however, needing advice/direction and thought this the best place to try.

    i have no experience in healthcare whatsoever; i've never worked in a doctor's office and i know no one who's a nurse or involved in a healthcare profession. i guess the first question, then, should probably be how can i know if i'll do well enough in this profession to abandon the one i'm in now?? (which shows promise...it's just not very interesting.) i'm a motived/hands-on/energetic kinda person...i just need the right direction to send all that energy and i'm thinking (a lot here lately) that nursing may be it. i'm a 'people person' and prefer dealing with people that i can see and speak with directly and i want to do something that i think is important. and, while business is important (which is what i'm in now, by the way), it's not important...('so what'd you do with your life?? uh, i learned to file and worked really hard on bid documents!' yuck...) what made you want to be a nurse?? how long did it take you?? have you regretted your choice?? could you suggest some programs??

    i currently live in smyrna, tn if that's make any difference. any information or words of wisdom/advice would be great.

    have a great night!
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Renee' Y-Y
    I was going to be a marine biologist...but after taking a summer job as a nursing assistant...I fell in love with nursing...and went directly from high school into nursing school and graduated about 4 years later. I have now been a nurse for about 18 years. Overall, nursing has been very good to me. I have been able to move around quite a bit within the profession without having to leave it.

    You do not have to have experience in the medical field in order to go into nursing and there are many, many options within the field after school. There are times when nursing is extremely hard work and...well...just downright nasty...but overall very rewarding.

    My advice...go for it...start working on your pre-reqs...after your first clinical course (usually about sophomore/jr year) you can get a better idea of what it's like. If you're really hesitant, go find a nursing asst program somewhere (about 6-8 weeks) & try it out. If you can tolerate NA work you can tolerate nursing.
  4. by   purplemania
    Nursing is a great field for people like you who are eager to learn and flexible enough to accept change. Not all nurses work in hospitals. There is a big variety. Right now there are plenty of jobs for nurses, and the salaries are comparable to other fields with similar amounts of education. I got my Asso. Degree in Tenn and began working as RN, then went back to school for BSN. The difference in pay from my old job to the first RN position was enough to pay off my loan (about $1500 since I qualified for scholarships). So it was definitely a good move for me. The benefits are more than monetary. You work with great people, are stimulated to be your own personal best, and get to help people in difficult times.
  5. by   Monist
    I was a waiter once, and truly liked it. I got good tips, usually, and I really liked interacting with the customer and getting them their food and alcohol the way they wanted it. In addition to that, I'm smart. I get an A in classes I like, especially biology classes. I also believe that Jesus spoke the truth in the Gospels, and I honestly do not want to be a doctor.

    Those are my foundations for knowing that I will make a good nurse. What are your indicators? There must be some or you wouldn't be thinking about becoming a nurse.

    The Monist
  6. by   Smile!
    Quote from purplemania
    Nursing is a great field for people like you who are eager to learn and flexible enough to accept change. Not all nurses work in hospitals. There is a big variety. Right now there are plenty of jobs for nurses, and the salaries are comparable to other fields with similar amounts of education. I got my Asso. Degree in Tenn and began working as RN, then went back to school for BSN. The difference in pay from my old job to the first RN position was enough to pay off my loan (about $1500 since I qualified for scholarships). So it was definitely a good move for me. The benefits are more than monetary. You work with great people, are stimulated to be your own personal best, and get to help people in difficult times.
    THAT'S what I want to do! I really like the thought of being able to help and want to be able to feel that I've made a difference somewhere. My job now is ok and I work with good people but it's just not INTERESTING. I mean, I work in an office for a construction company...We're talking steel, bolts, nuts, lift trucks, welders...I know SQUATT-O about that stuff and don't really have the inclination to LEARN about it. I also work with a bunch of guys...no girlies ANYWHERE...

    Do you think it's best to start off with an ADN and THEN go back for the BSN?? I'd REALLY like to be able to get some tuition help and I'm eager to jump in.
  7. by   Smile!
    Quote from Renee' Y-Y
    I was going to be a marine biologist...but after taking a summer job as a nursing assistant...I fell in love with nursing...and went directly from high school into nursing school and graduated about 4 years later. I have now been a nurse for about 18 years. Overall, nursing has been very good to me. I have been able to move around quite a bit within the profession without having to leave it.

    You do not have to have experience in the medical field in order to go into nursing and there are many, many options within the field after school. There are times when nursing is extremely hard work and...well...just downright nasty...but overall very rewarding.

    My advice...go for it...start working on your pre-reqs...after your first clinical course (usually about sophomore/jr year) you can get a better idea of what it's like. If you're really hesitant, go find a nursing asst program somewhere (about 6-8 weeks) & try it out. If you can tolerate NA work you can tolerate nursing.
    Do you mean CNA work?? I spoke with the director of the nursing program here at one of the local colleges and she suggested CNA work but, here, CNAs only make about $8 an hour and I'm currently making enough more that it's not really plausible for me. And, with my attending classes in my spare time and working full time, I don't know if I could tack an additional job...even if it were just part time.

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