Bait-and-Switch... :confused:

  1. 1. Ever apply for a job, get a quote on pay, then have it changed to a lower rate at interview?
    Or does this just happen to me?
    2. Do you take the job anyway?
    Or do you make a note to never work for these jerks?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   Furball
    Are you kidding? if the pay rate suddenly changes at interview, my coat is on and I'm heading for the door. C-ya!

    I'm currently planning to relocate going through real estate and job interviews. I NEED to know what my income will be in order to plan appropriately. Anyone who suddenly lowers the payscale is a jerk.
    Last edit by Furball on Apr 10, '02
  4. by   Agnus
    I've experience bait and switch with other things on a job interview. I took the job as was sorry. They continued to pull this stuff even after I hired on. I walked.
  5. by   Cascadians
    If they are not honest in the courtship, best foot forward, good behavior and all that, what's it going to be like deep in the trenches when TSHTF?

    No loss to the worker to avoid bad places
  6. by   Teshiee
    I notice when they quote a rate for instance they may say we will start you at 24.00 an hour. But your base rate will be 19.00 and the 5.00 dollars is based on time and a half and shift differential. That sucks! I don't know why they just say what your base rate is so you can have an idea what you are making. It is ********* if you ask me.
  7. by   Zee_RN
    Well, there may be more to the story.

    I have had people call me on the phone and ask for payrate information. I will quote them what I can with the knowledge I have about them. Then they come in for an interview and I find out they may have had their RN license since 1974 but didn't work from 1984 to 2000. That's gonna affect how much I pay them. If she told me on the phone she's been an RN since 1974, I'm going to quote her a rate for 28 years experience. But if she didn't work for 16 years, that's going to affect how much experience she REALLY has and hence, what I can offer her. Yes, this happens.

    Same thing with nursing assistants...they tell me they have been an CNA for 6 years. But they neglect to tell me about time off in between jobs. 3 months here, 6 months there, 2 months there. Or that they took a job as a telemarketer in between those 6 years of work experience and weren't working as a CNA. It adds up! I'm audited on the payrates I offer. I better be able to document why I offered what I did. Sometimes it gets quite complicated.

    This is why many HR departments will NOT quote rates unless they are in an interview with an application in front of them.

    Barring a situation like that, I would be very upfront with the HR person and ask them WHY the rate was different than what was quoted.
  8. by   montroyal
    Originally posted by Zee_RN
    Well, there may be more to the story.

    I have had people call me on the phone and ask for payrate information. I will quote them what I can with the knowledge I have about them. Then they come in for an interview and I find out they may have had their RN license since 1974 but didn't work from 1984 to 2000. That's gonna affect how much I pay them. If she told me on the phone she's been an RN since 1974, I'm going to quote her a rate for 28 years experience. But if she didn't work for 16 years, that's going to affect how much experience she REALLY has and hence, what I can offer her. Yes, this happens.

    Same thing with nursing assistants...they tell me they have been an CNA for 6 years. But they neglect to tell me about time off in between jobs. 3 months here, 6 months there, 2 months there. Or that they took a job as a telemarketer in between those 6 years of work experience and weren't working as a CNA. It adds up! I'm audited on the payrates I offer. I better be able to document why I offered what I did. Sometimes it gets quite complicated.

    This is why many HR departments will NOT quote rates unless they are in an interview with an application in front of them.

    Barring a situation like that, I would be very upfront with the HR person and ask them WHY the rate was different than what was quoted.
    Just out of curiosity, if a nurses works an average of 3000 hours in a calander year, due you give them a year and a half credit? You obviously take credit away for not working the 2000 hour accepted time in a year.
  9. by   twells
    I wouldn't walk right away. Making a lowball offer is a tactic taught in a lot of management workshops as a way to keep wage expenses down. I would look around carefully, though. I once had a manager tell me that staff were not allowed to work overtime on the unit. When whe showed me around, we passed the mandatory overtime signup board!

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Bait-and-Switch... :confused: