Bad Eyesight - page 2

I want to become a nurse....I am currently enrolled in a University with my major undeclared. I want to know if poor vision will keep me out of the nursing program or out of this career. I work,... Read More

  1. by   deespoohbear
    I have had glasses since I was 9 y/o (now in mid 30's) and had no trouble getting into school. I had to have a general medical check-up but I would think as long as you can read the eye chart with your glasses or contacts you should have no problems. Best wishes.
  2. by   KP RN
    Why is it that US SMART people always wear glasses (or contacts?)
  3. by   gwenith
    Originally posted by KP RN
    Why is it that US SMART people always wear glasses (or contacts?)
    Hey Kp - That is not as mad as it sounds there is a definite link between keratoconus and high intelligence. Compared to the rest of the population keratoconic patients are statistically more likely to have a tertiarly education.

    When I first heard about the link betwen Keraatoconus and intelligence I had just one answer - I wanna swap!
  4. by   GPatty
    I have worn glasses since I was a little girl, just yesterday grauated to my first pair of invisible line bifocals. No. Wearing glasses will not stop you from being a nurse. You go on and become what you want to be, glasses or no glasses.
    God bless!
    Julie
  5. by   llg
    As many others have written above, you don't need perfect vision to be a nurse. However, your question raises another, which is .... "At what point, does poor vision become a problem sufficient to warrent exclusion?"

    Now, don't get me wrong. I am asking this question, NOT to suggest that we keep people with poor vision out of nursing. Just the opposite. I am interested in promoting a greater of inclusion of people with signinficant "handicaps" into nursing.

    I, myself, am hearing-impaired. I know other hearing-impaired nurses who have been discriminated against because of their hearing loss. It seems we nurses are not as willing to accommodate the special needs of our colleagues as society expects other workers to be. While teaching at one university, I was told by my boss (a famous nursing leader) not to tell people about my hearing loss unless I really had to because my having a handicap would make the school look bad.

    As the nursing population ages, more and more of us will have a variety of aches and pains and assorted other problems related to eyes and ears, etc. How prepared are we as a profession to deal with that fact?

    I don't see it being discussed much.

    llg
  6. by   military wife
    To all of the wonderful folks answering my question....thank you for your words of wisdom and support. God Bless ALL of you!
  7. by   Love-A-Nurse
    welcome!
  8. by   igloorn93
    I'm one of those nurses who started out with 20/20 eyesight, and partway into my first year of nursing school had to get glasses as I couldn't see what I was suppossed to be studying!!! Have been wearing them eversince. Welcome aboard. We need more nurses.
  9. by   Dplear
    I swear to god this is true...I worked with a nurse that was blind in one eye and his vision was so bad in his good eye that he had to hold a piece of paper to his nose to read the writing on it. poor guy though, he ended up with a detached retina in his one good eye and that ended his nursing career.

    Dave
  10. by   tonicareer
    I talked to some nurses who don't wear glasses or contacts and a lot of them buy an over the counter pair of reading glasses to cope with the small print on packages and such. As long as you can see well enough to read no problem.
  11. by   renerian
    My hubby is legally blind without his specs. With them he sees to drive and can do all a nurse does.

    renerian
  12. by   lissyrn
    Have always functioned just fine despite being VERY nearsighte. Never had trouble reading drug inserts or syringes, but often have to hold things up close and toward my better eye (right).

    Well, new DON called me in and said that she was concerned about my poor vision and having to hold things up to my face....that I should do what I could to take care of the situation. Ran all over town to find an optician who could rush my new bifocal lenses over the weekend, just got them 2 days ago, and am having a terrible time getting used to them. Today, I was called in again about my eyesight. I am not only worried sick about my job, but also I feel humiliated. Going to spend tonight reading the phone book with my new bifocals, I can't lose this job...

    Anyone else been there?:uhoh21:
  13. by   cannoli
    Quote from lissyrn
    Have always functioned just fine despite being VERY nearsighte. Never had trouble reading drug inserts or syringes, but often have to hold things up close and toward my better eye (right).

    Well, new DON called me in and said that she was concerned about my poor vision and having to hold things up to my face....that I should do what I could to take care of the situation. Ran all over town to find an optician who could rush my new bifocal lenses over the weekend, just got them 2 days ago, and am having a terrible time getting used to them. Today, I was called in again about my eyesight. I am not only worried sick about my job, but also I feel humiliated. Going to spend tonight reading the phone book with my new bifocals, I can't lose this job...

    Anyone else been there?:uhoh21:
    I think she was out of line. As long as you can function and do your job, what's the problem?

    If she has a problem with your eyesight, get a note from the doctor saying that you see well enough to function as you need to.

    If your job is threatened, call a lawyer, sounds to me like she is way out of line.

    Good luck and let us know what happens.

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