Bad, Bad Incident. Can you refuse to work a particular unit? - page 2

Last night a pt smuggled blades into her room. She was found with slit wrists, bleeding all over. I'm wondering if it's possible to refuse work on a unit. I'm designated as a Float nurse (not what... Read More

  1. by   mamason
    If leaving this facility is not an option, then make sure your documentation is acurate of all events that are going on around you. Make sure you ask if there are any special precautions to take with certain pts. Things can easily get left out of report from the previous care giver. As others have suggested, set up a meeting to talk with NM, supervisor, DON, etc. whoever it takes to explain the situation with them. Document what was said. Cover your butt. Keep a journal at home and write what happens in your shift while it's still fresh in your memory. Get a list of new protacols for your floor and request that you recieve it in writting. Make a copy for yourself and keep it with you for reference should you need it at work. I would make sure I have every angle covered to the best of my ability.
  2. by   Meerkat
    Quote from mamason
    If leaving this facility is not an option, then make sure your documentation is acurate of all events that are going on around you. Make sure you ask if there are any special precautions to take with certain pts. Things can easily get left out of report from the previous care giver. As others have suggested, set up a meeting to talk with NM, supervisor, DON, etc. whoever it takes to explain the situation with them. Document what was said. Cover your butt. Keep a journal at home and write what happens in your shift while it's still fresh in your memory. Get a list of new protacols for your floor and request that you recieve it in writting. Make a copy for yourself and keep it with you for reference should you need it at work. I would make sure I have every angle covered to the best of my ability.
    Darn good advice. Thanks!!!
  3. by   mamason
    Good Luck Meerkat, I hope things get better for you at your facility.:wink2:
  4. by   nursemike
    My school gave--I mean, sold--each of us a copy of the Nurse Practice Act for our state. I would imagine most states have them available--you might check the campus bookstore at the nearest school of nursing. If that doesn't answer your questions, a consultation with an attorney might not be terribly expensive. Many lawyers around here will see you for an initial consult for $50 or so--a small price to pay, to protect your license and peace of mind.
  5. by   dedami
    One thing I always do whenever I float to another unit, is that during report, I tell the nurse that I am floating, and is there anything I need to know to do or check for for that patient that I might not know to do, because that isn't my usual floor. I ask this question about all the patient he / she reports to me about. Also, in the State of Texas, we can declare " safe harbor " in which we still float to another unit, however it is under official notification that we don't feel believe we have been adequately trained to work on that unit. It seems to me that if you don't know their rules / procedures, that maybe you could declare this. At our hospital, then the house supervisor on nights or head nurse of hospital on days, would be notified, and would come talk to us, and then let us know if we were the only person or not that could fulfill the hospital's needs at that time, and if so, then a form would be filled out and kept with the hospital. The idea is that if a lawsuit were to be filed on you at a later date concerning something that occurred that day, that that would be in the record, and would be beneficial to you -- that you didn't feel adequately prepared or trained to work on that floor, and that the head nurse of the hospital who was in charge at that time, had been notified.

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