attracting and retaining good nurses - page 2

Posing a question to those older.... experienced nurses out there...(you know who you are);) and all the others who care to answer!! Would you be willing to change jobs and accept a bit less in... Read More

  1. by   Dr. Kate
    A great, or even barely adequate, employer paid retirement plan does not make a decent place to work.

    Any decision to accept employment is multifaceted and no one factor really takes complete precedence.
  2. by   emily_mom
    If a hospital has a wonderful reputation, they don't have the staffing problems that others have. We have one smaller (200 bed) facility that hasn't had an opening for a nurse in 5 years. They pay less than the other facilities in the area, but you know why they stay? They are treated as human beings and have a voice. I did a clinical rotation there, and the camaraderie is amazing compared with the other hospitals. These people are like family to each other. They're not treated like cattle and are valued as employees. They know what to do to keep them happy, as I'm sure the administration doesn't want to go through what others are now. One has a $5000 sign on, another starts nurses out at $24/hr (norm around here is $18). These two hospitals have the reputation of treating their employees like cattle which is why they are in the boat they are now. If they would make working conditions better, more people would work there. Who wants to have an unsafe workload with no backup? I think if hospitals would get their heads out of their arses, we wouldn't have the shortage we have now. Maybe some people on sabbatical would consider coming back. We have enough nurses in the U.S. Unfortunately, due to adverse work conditions, they have driven them all away...

    Kristy
  3. by   Tweety
    Kristy, you bring up a good point. Sometimes it isn't about the money. For some, maybe a lot of people it is. But not for all as you've stated. And as Dr. Kate stated for some of us no one factor takes precidence.
  4. by   sjoe
    E-M writes: "They are treated as human beings and have a voice."

    AMEN. The very LAST thing that hospitals administrators and HR types seem to think of. This is NOT rocket science, people.
  5. by   kae rn
    Benefits are well worth it. A big benefit I am looking at in my next job is getting 1/2 price tuition for my 4 kids. Free for myself, there may be a masters in my future yet.
    I know hospital nursing will be hard to get back into, but so was staying home with the kids. Am used to being pulled in many directions. We as nurses just need to be better about asking others to help out, as well as offerring to help others. It isn't just the administration that makes working environments miserable. I truly believe that we are really hard on each other. Let's work on being kind to each other. :kiss
  6. by   2banurse
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    If a hospital has a wonderful reputation, they don't have the staffing problems that others have. We have one smaller (200 bed) facility that hasn't had an opening for a nurse in 5 years. They pay less than the other facilities in the area, but you know why they stay? They are treated as human beings and have a voice. I did a clinical rotation there, and the camaraderie is amazing compared with the other hospitals. These people are like family to each other. They're not treated like cattle and are valued as employees. They know what to do to keep them happy, as I'm sure the administration doesn't want to go through what others are now. One has a $5000 sign on, another starts nurses out at $24/hr (norm around here is $18). These two hospitals have the reputation of treating their employees like cattle which is why they are in the boat they are now. If they would make working conditions better, more people would work there. Who wants to have an unsafe workload with no backup? I think if hospitals would get their heads out of their arses, we wouldn't have the shortage we have now. Maybe some people on sabbatical would consider coming back. We have enough nurses in the U.S. Unfortunately, due to adverse work conditions, they have driven them all away...

    Kristy
    Working in a hospital such as you describe would be something I would look for when I am at the position of going to work as nurse. Especially as a new nurse, I would opt for this versus a higher paying, higher ratio,etc. But as you stated, it is hard to get into one because of this. I wish that other hospitals could see and use this to make changes.

    I'm tired of administrations thinking that by skimping on quality care will bring in a higher profit. In the end, they are only hurting themselves when they have to pay the exorbitant fees for using outside agencies. JMHO

    Kris
  7. by   suetje
    Well, I work at a hospital that matches your contribution to your 401(K) by double...yes, double. and we have many older nurses and staff that will not leave just because of that. Our jobs re paid OK, not as good as I think they should be (which means about 60K for a new RN, and up to or more than 100K for experienced RN's.) But most of the employees say that they would leave if it was not for the retirement. No kidding!!! So it does exist, even though one year they tried to cut it down.

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