ASN to BSN with another BS degree?

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    If I have a BS and an ASN and want to also get a BSN, would it even require many additional courses since I have the general ed courses from my first BS already? If I wanted to go into an MSN program, would my BS and ASN count together as a "BSN"? I can't really find the info on this that I am looking for, so I thought that I would turn to these boards. Anyone else done this?
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    Your general ed requirements from your previous BS do typically count toward the general ed requirements for a BSN. An associates in nursing plus a bachelors in another field do not equal a BSN, even for MSN purposes. You would still need to take the BSN courses you lack before entering a masters in nursing program.

    Some colleges and universities have a RN to MSN, but it's a bit of a misnomer, because you still take the BSN courses prior to starting the MSN courses. It's just a smoother transition, and you don't have to apply separately for the BSN and MSN programs.
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    Bluegrass RN is mistaken. At University of St. Francis (Joliet, IL) you would need to take 4 bridge classes to get into the MSN program. You would not receive a BSN, yet also you'd be saving yourself many credit hours too. I am in the same boat as you, I have a B.A. and an ADN. Other schools you made need to take a GRE test to get into the MSN (University of Illinois). The correct answer is depends on the school.
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    Hmm, I think it's just semantics. I'm sure not all RN to MSN programs are exactly the same, but most of them require several "bridge classes" (ie BSN classes). Most of my friends in RN to MSN programs spend about 2 semesters (some a little less) on the bridge program, which is basically equivalent to getting the BSN in terms of time.
    Crux1024 likes this.
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    I know at UCSF if you have a BS and an ASN, you can apply to their masters. I can't remember if they require additional classes or not, but I don't believe they do. They have a ADN to MSN Pathway, but that is only for people without any bachelors degree.
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    I think it just depends on the institution. The school I'll be advancing my education at has both ADN->BSN and ADN->MSN. When I looked at the ADN->MSN program their info states that you basically complete the ADN->BSN curriculum before taking Master's level classes, it just saves you time from applying to both programs separately.
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    Our local university requires 3 semester of nursing courses in their RN to BSN program. General ed content would be completely covered by your previous degree.
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    Of course not. Universities want to make money by making you take as much as possible.
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    Quote from happyinillinois
    Bluegrass RN is mistaken. At University of St. Francis (Joliet, IL) you would need to take 4 bridge classes to get into the MSN program. You would not receive a BSN, yet also you'd be saving yourself many credit hours too. I am in the same boat as you, I have a B.A. and an ADN. Other schools you made need to take a GRE test to get into the MSN (University of Illinois). The correct answer is depends on the school.
    Thanks for all the info! I was thinking there would be "bridge classes". I think I was mainly wondering if I would have to receive the BSN before MSN, but from what everyone has said, the bridge classes plus my other degrees would help eliminate applying for two separate programs.
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    Definitely look around for programs. I found one in my area that allows me to take a test and then start taking MSN classes immediately. No bridge classes, and the MSN portion is only 39 credits for the track I want. Most programs do require the BSN, but I think grad schools are starting to recognize the diversity of nursing programs and acting appropriately. Good luck!


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