Asking back for job...

  1. 0
    I was fired from my first new grad RN position almost 4 years ago and have been out of nursing since. I was been working as a patient care technician in an acute hospital since and have just recieved my BSN few week ago. I initially graduated with an ADN. I saw on my old employer's website that there is a position open in the same department. Should I talk to the manager about trying to get a RN position in the same unit and how should I go about it? Or would I just be wasting time? This honestly sucks...

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  2. 10 Comments...

  3. 3
    Why would you want to go back to a place that has fired you? Unless the termination was for purely budgetary reasons I would think that the relationship would now be tainted and that going back would be professionally dangerous.

    Your current employer will not hire you now that you have a BSN?
    BuckyBadgerRN, joanna73, and Fiona59 like this.
  4. 0
    I live the the Bay Area and new grad jobs are scare here. My employer now (which is a well known organization) have not been hiring new grads due to their budget. There are many licensed RN's that are working here, but just aren't able to find jobs. I just want to be able to get my 6 to 12 months or so experience in so I can finally branch out in nursing. Oh yeah, I worked at the old place for only 3 months, but I did feel the manager was on a "witch hunt/power trip" and everyone knew that. I had so many good reviews from all the senior staff nurses and even the patients, but I guess the manager didn't take that into account. I'm quite frustrated!
  5. 0
    Quote from sfbayrnski
    I live the the Bay Area and new grad jobs are scare here. My employer now (which is a well known organization) have not been hiring new grads due to their budget. There are many licensed RN's that are working here, but just aren't able to find jobs. I just want to be able to get my 6 to 12 months or so experience in so I can finally branch out in nursing. Oh yeah, I worked at the old place for only 3 months, but I did feel the manager was on a "witch hunt/power trip" and everyone knew that. I had so many good reviews from all the senior staff nurses and even the patients, but I guess the manager didn't take that into account. I'm quite frustrated!
    Is that manager still there?
  6. 0
    Yes, the same manager is still there. I may just be ridiculing myself to think I can even get a position there again, but I'm getting close to desperate...
  7. 0
    You have got to be kidding! WOW.
  8. 1
    Many things can change in 4 years. Chances are that since you were there for only 3 months the manager might not remember you.

    What's the harm in trying? The worst that can happen is that the answer is "no".
    nursbrooklyn likes this.
  9. 0
    Most definitely try it! You gotta do what you gotta do to get that experience.
  10. 0
    You say that you were fired from this position because the manager was on a "witch hunt"....and the manager is still there. Which means you won't be hired by her now, or likely ever.

    She fired you for a reason, or several reasons. Even if you don't believe them to be valid (hey, I wasn't there, I can't know), the fact remains that it's on your record as the reason you were fired. Even if it was a new manager, it might be a bit of a hurdle to get past that in your file, but you might have the chance to explain it. But it's NOT a new manager, it's the same one that canned you! I have no reason to believe that she wouldn't remember you, honestly: I don't care if someone's only been working a few months, if enough of an impression was made (negatively, for whatever reason) to have fired you after such a short time, then she'll remember you.

    I guess if you really feel you have nothing whatsoever to lose, apply....and hope to impress the heck out of her in an interview. But don't be surprised if your phone never rings for that interview.
  11. 0
    I agree, it's worth a try. Whenever you are involuntarily terminated from a job, the company categorizes you as either "eligible for re-hire" or "not eligible for re-hire". Be sure to find out your status when you leave. Many times, there are internal processes that automatically clear out the 'not eligible' after a period of time, so even if you were originally not eligible, this may have changed.


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