Are You Really a Nurse? Are You Really a Nurse? - pg.3 | allnurses

Are You Really a Nurse? - page 3

Test Your Knowledge Before reading the article, take the short true or false poll at the bottom of the article to test your knowledge. Do you cringe when people use the word “nurse” loosely?... Read More

  1. Visit  LovingLife123 profile page
    #26 4
    I think it also comes down to the public and MAs and other UAPs not understanding the role of a nurse. They say, well, I do the same things a nurse does thinking it's all about the small things we do, like ivs, blood draws, giving injections, taking vitals. They don't see what we actually do.

    They don't see that we are always assessing. Yes, I draw labs. But it's what I do with those lab results that's important. What does my patient need based on those results. Yes, I take vitals. But what do I do based on those results with vitals? What if that patients BP is 60/40? A UAP is not trained on how to look at that and know what to do.

    Yes, we report the results to the physician but I better know what the heck is going on with my patient when I call. A front office person or a MA does not know what to do with that and I think that's where the education needs to come in.

    They don't understand that I'm constantly assessing my patient. Since it's something they don't always see us doing, our most important job gets lost on the public and UAPs.
  2. Visit  Floyd Nightingale profile page
    #27 4
    Everybody is a nurse. I know this because everybody tells me they're a nurse. It's usually a friend or family member of a patient that I'm preparing to draw blood from and start an IV on, or give meds to, or whatever. The nurse friend becomes the liaison or advocate who explains to the patient and other friends or family what I'm doing. It usually ends with "wait, that's not a butterfly!". No, it's a 20g angiocath.

    A coworker once told me she handled it with "I'm giving you labetolol, your "nurse" friend can tell you what it's for an any side effects it may have." Yes, I work with some evil nurses, some of whom are actually licensed.

    Further inquiry always reveals that the nurse is actually a medical assistant, or is on the waiting list for nursing school, or is thinking about taking a phlebotomy class, or watches Gray's Anatomy/Scrubs/ER/whatever, or has a cousin whose neighbor's ex-fiance's brother-in-law met a nurse one time. All that gives everybody free reign to tell me what to do.

    Oh, and anybody else notice that every time you go out the topic of conversation between the waiter/waitress and the bartender is where they are on the waiting list for nursing school. Here's a tip: if you're a lousy waitress you'll make for a lousy..., oh never mind.

    Then there was the tech I worked with. She was pre-med, which apparently gave her license to sign off orders with an MD after her name. She was something of a problem. The other techs hated her because she had some education while the rest of them, well, I think they found them at a bus station or someplace similar. And then I heard that she had an affair with a physician but it went bad and she filed grievances, maybe a lawsuit, and it ended up in the papers. Don't get me started on the people who end up being ED techs. I'm picturing the ad - no intelligence or decision making skills or common sense required, must be able to question directives and argue, laziness a plus...
  3. Visit  Extra Pickles profile page
    #28 5
    Quote from Floyd Nightingale
    Then there was the tech I worked with. She was pre-med, which apparently gave her license to sign off orders with an MD after her name. She was something of a problem.
    Something of a problem?? then again she'd only be a problem for a very short time where I work as she would have been fired for fraud, misrepresentation and anything else anyone could throw at her as she was being hurled out the door onto her butt.
  4. Visit  Extra Pickles profile page
    #29 5
    I don't know why people think it isn't any big deal if a non-nurse calls herself a nurse when we all agree it is a big deal when a non-physician calls herself a physician. Then again I really do know why, it's because nursing is still looked down on as a job instead of a career, and as menial on-the-job learned training instead of professional education and knowledge. People still ask about where nurses had their training and where doctors went to medical school. People see doctors as being medical professionals with degrees and residencies to earn them the honor of being an MD or DO but they see nurses as being something like doctors' helpers who follow orders really well and fill out forms and such. It's disheartening to see how little the public understands of what we do and how we got to the levels of education and practice so many of us have today.

    so year it's annoying when Betty Boop, who once took a semester of a nursing program before flunking out, calls herself the Office Nurse where she works as a receptionist, but it's not hard to understand why the public doesn't see the difference. Betty Boop, Office Nurse told her to put ice on that bruise and by golly she feels much better, isn't Betty an awesome nurse? So here we are.
  5. Visit  Lanie_82NS profile page
    #30 2
    I just recently graduated a nursing program. I'm working as a grad Nurse but make sure to identify to everyone that I'm not yet a nurse because in haven't sat for boards. It makes me so mad (especially in my drs office) to see a ma referring to her/himself as a nurse.
  6. Visit  JMurse89 profile page
    #31 3
    I hate when pt's or family members say "yeah I used to be a nurse" and they're clearly lying. Then I look them up and find nothing on the BON website. And my PCP's office used to refer to the MAs as the doctors nurses. I think the recording says assistants now. Drives me crazy! We worked so hard to get where we are and these people just throw the term around.
  7. Visit  Carabella profile page
    #32 2
    Quote from K8JAJ8
    I'm sorry, but I completely disagree. When Raggles the wino calls himself a nurse, it damages the reputation of your profession and the respect it demands. That not only makes your job harder, but it will affect your compensation when providers hire less qualified individuals because the patients can't tell the difference anyway.

    I worked too hard to call myself a nurse.
    Totally agree!
  8. Visit  Extra Pickles profile page
    #33 7
    sitting here quietly enjoying the image of Raggles the Wino with a stethoscope. And etoh pads lol.
  9. Visit  JMurse89 profile page
    #34 1
    Quote from Floyd Nightingale
    Further inquiry always reveals that the nurse is actually a medical assistant, or is on the waiting list for nursing school, or is thinking about taking a phlebotomy class, or watches Gray's Anatomy/Scrubs/ER/whatever, or has a cousin whose neighbor's ex-fiance's brother-in-law met a nurse one time...
    I don't even ask anymore. It gives them the satisfaction of thinking I actually care. I just correct them every chance I get, which is usually pretty frequent.

    And yes, I think laziness is a must for all ED techs. Must be taught in orientation. Though we do have a few good ones I will say. Working with them is a bonus.
  10. Visit  ZEBRA57 profile page
    #35 2
    It is critical to restrict the use of the term NURSE to registered licensed nurses. It is just as critical that we find a way to permit our colleagues & patients to recognize our status. I have been a REGISTERED NURSE since 1969!! (full disclosure) I am still working part time in an acute care hospital in Canada in Ambulatory Day Clinics as a NURSE CLINICIAN. In the "old" days nurses wore caps ---- now relegated to antiquity. We were also required to wear our school pins. The essential defining feature of the cap was a "black band" which was only worn by Registered Nurses. It was easily seen & patients & doctors alike knew you were a NURSE. Today we must wear hospital ID tags but these are not easily legible & all hospital staff wears tags not just nurses. It is essentially a security measure.
    Now we find ourselves in a situation, in which not even nurses, know who the other nurses are in other units. A patient in any setting has a right to know when he/she is receiving care from a professional licensed nurse & when it is an auxiliary staff.
    We have the same problem here in doctors offices & institutions outside hospitals, that direct care is often provided by some other staff because nurses are considered too expensive. The law here states that these people are prohibited from calling themselves nurses.
    However, the patients often assume that these individuals are nurses and no one corrects this error.
    We have all worked hard for our education & ongoing updates in our knowledge base. We bring this to our professional interactions & relationships, plus there is a rather arduous code for professional conduct & responsibilities. ALL this needs to be protected & respected.
    It is not a problem for doctors to expect to be acknowledged. Why is this an issue when NURSES expect to be recognized as the licensed professional that they are? To you we who have come before, toss the torch of our profession & now it is your turn to hold it high!!
    Last edit by ZEBRA57 on Dec 21, '16 : Reason: spelling mistake
  11. Visit  2bgoodnow profile page
    #36 4
    I like this response, and I agree with that! When it comes to patient care, are we (nurses) concern about our title or things that we can do for our patients? An ego bigger than the whole world does not make me a better nurse the way I look at it. I have been a LVN, now RN-BSN, PHN, CHPN, and now going for my MSN, but those may not mean anything to anybody until I show my patients what I can do for them for their best interests. Sorry!
    Last edit by 2bgoodnow on Dec 21, '16
  12. Visit  2bgoodnow profile page
    #37 2
    "Legally, yes, there can be issues. Personally? No. I don't care if Raggles the Wino huddled in the parking lot calls themselves a nurse. It doesn't make my job any harder, nor does it affect compensation for doing my job, so I don't care. I did not become a nurse to satisfy any aspect of ego."

    I like this response, and I agree with that! When it comes to patient care, are we (nurses) concern about our title or things that we can do for our patients? An ego bigger than the whole world does not make me a better nurse the way I look at it. I have been a LVN, now RN-BSN, PHN, CHPN, and now going for my MSN, but those may not mean anything to anybody until I show my patients what I can do for them for their best interests. Sorry!
    Last edit by 2bgoodnow on Dec 21, '16
  13. Visit  CatCare profile page
    #38 3
    Techs are referred to as veterinary nurses in the UK and other areas. A Career in Veterinary Nursing - BVNA
    If they have gone through training and licensure I don't see why that should be problematic.

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