Are you in Nursing for the Caring or the Cash?? Be Honest - page 7

hello i am currently in nursing school and the weirdest thing is how future nurses talk about how they are going to be getting paid!! it's as if caring is not involved in their frame of mind, this... Read More

  1. by   KacyLynnRN
    [QUOTE=lgflamini]Lisa, are you in a LPN-RN bridge program? Maybe that's why your fellow students are talking about the money. Let's face it- a $10/hr pay increase is reason enough to go from LPN to RN.

    WOAH BABY!!!! $10 an hour pay increase? I am in an LPN to RN bridge right now, and I think I will be lucky, very lucky, if I make $5 more an hour when I get my RN vs. now as an LPN!!! Am I missing something??
  2. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Hi Lisa-
    I'm in the middle of Nursing Schoool as well. I have to say, I did not go back for the money per se. I love Nursing and had been toying with the idea of going back to school, but what finally clinched it for me was the stability and flexibility of Nursing as a career. I have not been sorry. I love it. The pay is not bad, but if I were in it solely for the money and not to take care of people, I would be with the other 60% of my class that left before the end of the first semester. I think ten poeple walked out during the first hour of orientation when they found out that they would actually have to touch patients! Horror of horrors! One of them said, (and this is a direct quote) " . . . But that's not what nurses on Guiding Light or ER do!" Oh well, like the professors (and Stuart Smalley) said: This may not be for you and that's . . .okay!
  3. by   nursemeow
    I don't think there is any other profession that would have this discussion on these terms. It's funny. Do I feel guilty saying that money definaltey played a part on why I'm about to grad. in December from nursing school? Yes, sure I do. I think alot of nurses/students feel that need to defend themselves and feel guilt AND I SAY NO MORE!!! WE ABSOLULETY should be paid very well and be proud of our earnings!! Of course I care... infact, I think most of us care soo much that it IS the reason why we tense up at this topic. The nurse who admits she enjoys a nice paycheck is not as great as the nurse who speaks that money is not an issue and she wanted to be a nurse her whole life... BULL! Whatever our own reasons were to become a nurse are many and do not need justification or judgement. As nurses by definition you care. It is a great topic and it is the elephant in the classroom alot of the times. I just want to scream. Yes, money. CARING is a given. It just is who I am. And, it's thru school that I fell in love with cardiology..Now I'm eager to learn more...Caring just is. Oh and PS... Jersey is rediculously expensive so a career that can keep me by my family is priceless.. You all rock.
  4. by   angel337
    Quote from tfrankern
    I have worked in just about every area of nursing including ICU,CCU,SICU,ER NICU TELE, PICU, home health and finally hospice. I've done lots of agency and had experience with traveling as well. IT'S NOT ABOUT THE MONEY!!! If nurses actually got paid for what we do and not for what we are supposed to do for the goodness of other people the healthcare industry would not be able to afford us. Think about what you do in every day at your job and compare that to a regular 8-5, M-F job. Most people in other fields do much less for the same if not much more than nurses.
    Now that isn't to say that nursing isn't flexible and you can go do agency and make fast cash when you are in a bind. But, when you get a little older, those long, hard agency shifts get more difficult. So, you end up finding a place where you can be of service, be fulfilled in your career and get paid for it. I make a living but there is nothing left over and no savings to be had. As for benefits, most of the places I've worked in nursing, the healthcare field in general has sucky benefits. Oh, i've got insurance ok, but the copays are ridiculous, especially when I'm caring for people who get everything for free or that have wonderful benefits from their employer etc.
    Generally, I'm happy with what I do and probably wouldn't do anything else but I do get on my soapbox about the disrespect that we are shown and the lack of adequate compensation. Do it for the love of it, not for the cash, you will burn out quickly if you do.
    you make excellent points, but one thing you forgot to mention about the 8-5 jobs that make more money is ...what jobs are those? this is the reason people are going into nursing for the money and stability. those so called normal 8-5 jobs that pay better than nursing just aren't there. they are very competitive, hard to find and a college grad can go 6 months before they find work. i know, i have been there and so have tons of people i know with business, law, IT and other degrees. my salary literally tripled when i got out of nursing school from my 9-5 job that paid me crap. people are tired of pink slips and constant threat of being laid off. but i agree that you must be able to be a caring person to survive in nursing or you won't make it. as far as making a living goes, i believe people just need to live within their means. i know nurses that make over six figures a year and they are broke because they don't save and they spend irrationally. when other careers pick up, nursing will slowly be a less desirable career, but until then people will continue to pursue a career that guarantees food on the table.
  5. by   hitechlvn
    The main thing I remeber from school is that I was working as a CNA in my off school hours and we had a baby and that my wife and I would sometimes be eating hot dogs or ramen noodles or peanut butter sandwiches, borrowing money for gas for school and to pay the electric bill so I could see to study. We had no phone and the car was a total clunker. Most jobs in my area of California didn't pay very well for unskilled labor and looking forward to that paycheck kept me going THROUGH nursing school. I went into school to become a nurse, because that is what I felt I was meant to do. As we all know, the paycheck could be better (to bad i don't play pro sports) but there is nothing wrong with getting paid to go to work. Because you get a paycheck, you are able to go and comfort that dying patient or care for that person after surgery. If you had to volunteer your time to do that, would you be able to? Probably not if you were trying to feed a family and were not from an affluent family. The socio-economic factors of your classmates may keep money in the forefront of their thinking .
  6. by   SOCALRACERX911_RN
    [QUOTE=lizz]I agree.

    [/QUOTE

    initially, it was to increase my level of responsiblity in health care. but why lie, the money is great but belief me you will work to earn every penny. I went from $16 as a tech to $33 hr as a nurse in only 1.5 yrs as a nurse. the time and a half and double time doesnt hurt either if you want the extra shifts. dont get me wrong caring is a big part of it because if you did not you wont last to long in this business.
  7. by   Tweety
    Quote from roxannekkb
    So then perhaps nurses should work for free? Or just accept a pittance, and maybe some bread and water to live on? Does being a nurse mean one should not have a decent standard of living, or does being a nurse mean that you must be a self-sacrificing martyr?

    I'm sorry, but attitudes like your help keep nursing in the downtrodden state that it's in. Nurses have fought long and hard to get pay raises, improved working conditions, and so on. The profession does not need martyrs who feel that one can live by caring alone. Tell that to your landlord, or the store where you buy your food.
    Excellent points. We are college grads and deserve our pay and we work very very hard. Would I work this hard for less money? No.

    To be the devil's advocate, however, I don't like working with people who are in it ONLY for the money. Thank goodness there aren't many of them, and they are a smear on the profression. Am I making sense?
  8. by   deathnurse
    and the grief that goes with it.
  9. by   mother/babyRN
    Considering the non english speaking refrigeration person who responded to our query regarding the non functioning freezer portion elected to say simply through his translator partner that the thing was broken and would take four hundred dollars to fix with seventy five dollars of that going to their "labor", I doubt if ANYone goes in it for the money...at least not those of us directly concerned and participating in patient care...
  10. by   veteranRN
    I went to nursing school strictly for the money. I was a CNA and a single mom with two kids and knew I needed a career where I could support my kids. So nursing school it was because I was familiar with the field and the pay would support us. Now, I am also a very nurturing person so now I would say I stay in it for the caring and the pay. With all the BS that goes on in nursing and the administration, I wouldn't stay in it if I thought I could get a mindless job elsewhere making the same. The patients I love, it is the politics of nursing and the administration I am not happy with.
  11. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Our profession has a long history of being underpaid and under appreciated.

    I think there is a connection.

    If people are willing to pay for something, they respect and value it. If they get it for cheap or for free, it's like, oh well, more where that came from.

    I am quality, my work is quality and I am worth what I am worth. If my employer doesn't see that and I am dissatisfied, I go some place else. So will the patients, and the employer will change policy. That's how it works. You get what you pay for, and what you get is worth what you pay for it.

    As helper types, we have the idea that access to exceptional care is a right--it isn't, it's a privilege to be able to receive exceptional care, way above the minimum necessary. The right is to receive enough. Privilege is to receive more than enough.

    We do not provide private duty round the clock RN's to people whose need is for a semiprivate room on a med surg floor.

    I have given away more than I have collected on in my life as a professional helper. It is bread cast on the waters, as far as I am concerned--it comes back one way or another, or it doesn't and that's OK, because it was my choice at the time. I can't and won't do that anymore. I'll be paid appropriately. If I want to do missions, I'll go do missions. But I won't work in big business for less than a good salary, because trust me, big business is charging through the nose for what I am being paid to do.

    And this ought to start the do-gooders off on a "tromp Chris" episode, because they are going to suggest that I do not care as much as they do for the working class. Not so. Probably I care more. That's not a related issue....
  12. by   LovePeaceJoy
    I've heard about these 8-5, 9-5, whatever to whatever jobs that keep being mentionned on this board that are supposed to be so much less stressful, so much more rewarding, so well paying, and so less physically demanding than nursing. The only think I can maybe agree on is that an office job might be less demanding physically. I think these comments usually come from people that have not had any other job than a nursing job. Any office job with a moderately decent pay scale requires you to work for your money. This may include getting business calls in the evening and weekends, coming in early and leaving two hours late. AND GUESS WHAT-- MOST OF THE TIME YOU DO NOT GET OVERTIME. Lunch? What Lunch? Those wonderful IT jobs that some nurses think are a piece of cake because people might have the opportunity to work from home, require you to work 60 hours a week and will then lay you off when the job goes to India. :angryfire

    Let's talk about burnout rate. The marketing managers in my industry usually burn out in about two years. With their travelling schedules they easily work more than 70 hours a week (including weekends) and get paid less than the recent grad NY nurse working a 3 day, 12 hour shift.


    I guess the grass is always greener....




    Quote from angel337
    you make excellent points, but one thing you forgot to mention about the 8-5 jobs that make more money is ...what jobs are those? this is the reason people are going into nursing for the money and stability. those so called normal 8-5 jobs that pay better than nursing just aren't there. they are very competitive, hard to find and a college grad can go 6 months before they find work. i know, i have been there and so have tons of people i know with business, law, IT and other degrees. my salary literally tripled when i got out of nursing school from my 9-5 job that paid me crap. people are tired of pink slips and constant threat of being laid off. but i agree that you must be able to be a caring person to survive in nursing or you won't make it. as far as making a living goes, i believe people just need to live within their means. i know nurses that make over six figures a year and they are broke because they don't save and they spend irrationally. when other careers pick up, nursing will slowly be a less desirable career, but until then people will continue to pursue a career that guarantees food on the table.
  13. by   Betty_SPN_KS
    Quote from chris_at_lucas
    Our profession has a long history of being underpaid and under appreciated.

    I think there is a connection.

    If people are willing to pay for something, they respect and value it. If they get it for cheap or for free, it's like, oh well, more where that came from.

    I am quality, my work is quality and I am worth what I am worth. If my employer doesn't see that and I am dissatisfied, I go some place else. So will the patients, and the employer will change policy. That's how it works. You get what you pay for, and what you get is worth what you pay for it.

    As helper types, we have the idea that access to exceptional care is a right--it isn't, it's a privilege to be able to receive exceptional care, way above the minimum necessary. The right is to receive enough. Privilege is to receive more than enough.

    We do not provide private duty round the clock RN's to people whose need is for a semiprivate room on a med surg floor.

    I have given away more than I have collected on in my life as a professional helper. It is bread cast on the waters, as far as I am concerned--it comes back one way or another, or it doesn't and that's OK, because it was my choice at the time. I can't and won't do that anymore. I'll be paid appropriately. If I want to do missions, I'll go do missions. But I won't work in big business for less than a good salary, because trust me, big business is charging through the nose for what I am being paid to do.

    And this ought to start the do-gooders off on a "tromp Chris" episode, because they are going to suggest that I do not care as much as they do for the working class. Not so. Probably I care more. That's not a related issue....
    I agree with you, Chris. If the business is a money-making business, why shouldn't we be paid for what we do. If you want to work missions, that's fine. I might do that someday, but for now I'm helping support my family.
    I like helping people, but also I like bringing in some money. I want to go on in nursing because I want more opportunities. Nursing is a field that offers variety.

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