Are you in Nursing for the Caring or the Cash?? Be Honest - page 12

hello i am currently in nursing school and the weirdest thing is how future nurses talk about how they are going to be getting paid!! it's as if caring is not involved in their frame of mind, this... Read More

  1. by   Gromit
    Quote from hipab4hands
    Actually both at the beginning of my career. Now, I appreciate the flexible hours, good pay and the occasional thank- you from a patient.

    I became dishearten with Nursing, when I realized how many patients have the "Burger King" mentality ie. I want it now and I want it my way.
    not only that, but the families, they are getting as bad or worse.
    got chewed on by a wife because I didn't "hop-to" and get coffee for her (I was busy passing drugs and doing accuchecks at that point. I'd told her I would get it, but medications came first -the coffee was for her, not the patient (who was NPO -personally, I'd have been ashamed to drink and eat in front of a family member (or anyone else) who was unable to eat or drink).
    What really got my boiler running is that she told me that she was a nurse, and "we treat family better at MY facility!" (yeah, I'd like to treat her better.)
    Nerve.
    sorry, just a little vent (grin). The "only for the money" crowd wouldn't last long in this field anyway. I don't worry about them too much.
  2. by   hipab4hands
    What really got my boiler running is that she told me that she was a nurse, and "we treat family better at MY facility!" (yeah, I'd like to treat her better.)
    Nerve.
    sorry, just a little vent (grin). The "only for the money" crowd wouldn't last long in this field anyway. I don't worry about them too much.[/QUOTE]LOL-- I Wonder why her family member was hospitalized at your facility, if her facility was so wonderful?

    One of my favorite calls I get from our patients is that they are on the way to the airport to go on vacation, and think they have (insert any illness), and would like to stop by the pharmacy to pick an rx for an antibiotic in the next 10 minutes.
    You should hear the howls of protest, when I have to inform then that I need at least 4 hrs to get a response from a MD for a med request. Usually what happens is that their (insert any illness) is now an "emergency" and has to be treated right away. In which case, I very sweetly direct them to go to our local ER.
  3. by   Gromit
    Quote from hipab4hands
    One of my favorite calls I get from our patients is that they are on the way to the airport to go on vacation, and think they have (insert any illness), and would like to stop by the pharmacy to pick an rx for an antibiotic in the next 10 minutes.
    You should hear the howls of protest, when I have to inform then that I need at least 4 hrs to get a response from a MD for a med request. Usually what happens is that their (insert any illness) is now an "emergency" and has to be treated right away. In which case, I very sweetly direct them to go to our local ER.
    hehehehe. I almost blew tea through my nose!

    At my last facility, working as an NT, I spent a few shifts (well, a little more than a few -they were trying to "woo" me into the ER due to my years of time working in emergency medicine in the field -but I have no interest in emergency medicine, certainly not in an emergency room) in their ER, and listen to the complaints about how long it will be before they are seen (for such amazing items as -I kid you not- in-grown toenail, knee pain, back ache, etc.)
    One evening, several of us rushed into the waiting room to break up a fight that started because a guy who had been "waiting for several hours! all day!" was passed-up (again) by a guy who came in (walk-in) with an (apparent) heart attack (the guy was, and died about a half-hour later, in the ER).
    Security in that facility was "manned" by retirees -nothing against them, but I'd rather have bulky young men as my security team.
    ERs are too insane. My hat will be off to any who enjoy it, but my emergency days are way behind me.
  4. by   Gromit
    Didn't want to end this on that note.
    The upswing is far greater than the down-sides. I've met some truly amazing people.
    I had a patient once who was actually a few blocks from Pearl Harbor when the attack happened (he had gotten stationed there only two weeks before), he met his wife there, and after the war, they found each other and got married. She had passed away a little before I met him (I think it was less than a year. I was in my second year of RN school, so I was a tech).
    The guy was elated that I shared an interest in WWII aviation, and had (have?) a pretty extensive knowledge regarding the planes of the time (both "ours" and those of the axis powers -general WWII aviation knowledge) and I spent my lunch break for the shifts that he was in our facility, sitting in his room, talking about the aircraft, the armaments and flight characteristics, etc.
    I truly enjoyed it, and hopefully, brought some good times and memories back for him.
    Ive had some outstanding patients that I can honestly say that, getting to know them made me look forward to completing my course.
    Met a woman who actually flew planes during WWII, not in action of course, but to ferry them from one point to another (in the United States). She had experience in several aircraft, and went on to become skilled at working on their engines -I told her about the engine I want to power my future biplane (m-14P 9 cylinder radial -russian made) and provided her with some of the pics and layouts.
    these are patients that I'll never forget, and will certainly think about, when I get to build my biplane (several years away before I can begin construction) and take to the air.
  5. by   dhudzinski
    To be valued for what I (we) do is very important and high on my list. Caring is important because if we do not care then why put up with the long hours and thankless work. Now the money is important too.

    As a society we put monetary value on things and people. We pay for quality. "You get what you Pay for" (Well, At least most of the time). I am worth more than I am paid. And some days if I concentrate on that fact I get angry and what to do something about it. But most days I am just happy to have a job with some sense of security and portability.

    Nursing as a profession has done itself an injustice in accepting the wages we do. We live in an upside down society. Those who do the most meaningful and valuable work get paid the least. Nurses, Teachers, and child care workers.

    We think nothing of paying a plumber or electrician or mechanic $100/hr but we are embarrassed to ask for the same pay as a nurse. Not only do we not value the nurses but we do not value our children and our elderly.

    I love my work and I have advanced in my career over the past 35 years but I work hard and have little to show for it. I don't want to be a millionaire (now that is really a lie, because I would love to have all that money) but I do want to live comfortably and be able to do some extra things like afford to go on mission trips and help my family.

    there is no getting around it we need money. Money makes the world go round. We need to stand together and demand the money that we deserve.
    I agree with whoever said that we value what we pay for. and we determine value based on what we pay.

    I am going around in circles with this so I am going to quit now.
  6. by   TECH715
    I am finally taking the leap to go back to school primarily because I love to take care of people especially children and the elderly. I have felt this way since I was younger about 17ish. I am now 36 and going back to school to be what my grandmother always said I should be. A nurse!!!!!!!!!!!
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from dhudzinski
    To be valued for what I (we) do is very important and high on my list. Caring is important because if we do not care then why put up with the long hours and thankless work. Now the money is important too.

    As a society we put monetary value on things and people. We pay for quality. "You get what you Pay for" (Well, At least most of the time). I am worth more than I am paid. And some days if I concentrate on that fact I get angry and what to do something about it. But most days I am just happy to have a job with some sense of security and portability.

    Nursing as a profession has done itself an injustice in accepting the wages we do. We live in an upside down society. Those who do the most meaningful and valuable work get paid the least. Nurses, Teachers, and child care workers.

    We think nothing of paying a plumber or electrician or mechanic $100/hr but we are embarrassed to ask for the same pay as a nurse. Not only do we not value the nurses but we do not value our children and our elderly.

    I love my work and I have advanced in my career over the past 35 years but I work hard and have little to show for it. I don't want to be a millionaire (now that is really a lie, because I would love to have all that money) but I do want to live comfortably and be able to do some extra things like afford to go on mission trips and help my family.

    there is no getting around it we need money. Money makes the world go round. We need to stand together and demand the money that we deserve.
    I agree with whoever said that we value what we pay for. and we determine value based on what we pay.

    I am going around in circles with this so I am going to quit now.
    Bravo!!!!!
  8. by   nurse2be2007
    I am 33 years old, mother of four beautiful girls, one whom is in heaven. When my first daughter was born with a severe birth defect, I was only 20 years old. We lived in the hospital, it was our home away from home. I observed the nursing staff, their responsibilities and their every day routines. I began to talk with them about nursing as a career and decided then that I wanted to be a nurse. I dedicated myself to taking care of my daughter and in 1995 my second daughter was born. Shortly after that my oldest past away. Deciding that I wanted to be home with my baby, we sacrificed a great deal for me to do so. In 1998, my third daughter was born. I put my dream of becoming a nurse on the back burner because first and foremost I was a mom. When my third daughter was entering kindergarten I decided it was time to start looking around for a good 2 year nursing school.

    In February of 2003, I found out I was pregnant with my 4th child. Yes I was devastated, I didnt want another baby, but too much fun on New Year's Eve, hubby and I had to pay the piper. I saw my dreams of going back to school shatter before my eyes, because I knew that in my heart I would want to stay at home with this new little life to raise it just like I had the others. Mid way through my pregnancy I found out it was another girl. I was estatic, I wanted another girl, and yes Hubby was hopeful for a boy. Getting to the point here I promise .

    After my last daughter was born, hubby and I sat down to discuss our options. My mom recently retired so I am going back to school for my ASN. When I start this fall, the baby will be one so at least I was able to be with her for her first year. I wont actually start nursing classes till next fall with all the pre-req's so she will actually be two when I take the deep plunge. I think this is the best thing for me and my family.

    Ok with the history lesson on my life behind us, let me get to the point of this thread. I want to be a nurse because it is a passion that is lying dormant, however, the pay, the flexibility and the stability are all big pluses in my book. I am not, nor will I ever be ashamed to say that the salary is not a factor because it is and very well should be.

    Now to comment on the post about making a BSN the standard for nursing. If that were to ever happen, the shortage of nurses would be far worse than they currently are. I know nurses that have their ASN that are far more knowledgeable than a nurse with a BSN, the flip is also true. I dont think that a person who CAN go 4 plus years to college should look down on or think they are better than someone who only went 2 years, well 3 years where I am at with all the pre-reqs. Then I have experienced CNA's who were far more caring and compassionate than an RN was. It's the person that makes the nurse or care giver not the degree they are wearing.

    I dont believe the reason one wants to become a nurse should be the focus of complaint, rather what kind of nurse that person becomes after school. If a person enters school to be a nurse for the soul purpose of the pay, and then graduates from school as one of the most compassionate nurses in his/her graduating class, should his/her reasons for becoming a nurse really have that much relevance. Or what about the student that enters nursing school because they love people, want to care for people in a nurturing way, yet after graduation they are the most thoughtless, nastiest, rudest nurses around. Should her behavior not matter because she didnt think about the money first?

    Ok I am finished. This thread just bit me in the wrong spot. Wow what a way to get acquainted with the newbie LOL. Oh well, its only one opinion in the lot.

    Take care

    P.S. Sorry for any typos, I have an 8 year in my ear complaining about my rules.
  9. by   BSN07
    [font=Comic Sans MS]I believe everyone has their own reason for becoming a nurse. At the age of 44, I went back to school to get my BSN. This has been a passion of mine for 20 years. I love to care for people and help them in any way I can; be it emotionally, compassionately, or just listening to them.
    [font=Comic Sans MS]I also am pursuing my dream because I have three children to support. Ages 14, 13, and 11. The fact that nursing is a diverse field that can fit any schedule(at least in our area), I am going for it. From what I have heard as far as pay scales, nurses are greatly underpaid! In nursing class the first day our instructor told us "If your'e in it for the money, you may want to evaluate your reason for being here." Nursing is a caring, compassionate field that requires dedication. My respect to all of the nurses out there, soon I will be one of you!
  10. by   franklin e. kock
    undefined
    For care or for money? I guess its for both, a nurse needs to rest properly eat properly go on vacation exercise etc. Most of us have families that depend on us for everything from helping with the homework to telling bedside stories and feeding them properly(this we also learn in the Nuticional part of our education). So for the care was where it all started, but eventually getting paid becomes a close second place. And what we learn we also apply at home when the calling comes for medical attention. So its a win win situation most of the time and we can always get a job because of the shortages in this field. :wink2:
  11. by   hospicemom
    Quote from nurseunderwater
    Both.....I wonder though how long the "just in it for the money" contingent lasts doing floor nursing....
    Believe me, I am a floor RN and even though the money is great..I am truely thinking about the money for about 30 seconsds every 2 weeks.....I live and breath the hospital, I am overworked, understaffed.......ask me if I would have gone back to school had I known what I would be getting myself into? Dont get my wrong..I LOVE my job....its the politics I can do without.
  12. by   ddc101
    Both.It takes caring to nurse and cash to pay the bill.I am no Mother Theresa.lv sis.c
  13. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from kathi yudin
    see nurses that actually have loyalty to where they work, and are in it for a love and desire to help rather then see where they can get the most money.
    It's difficult to be "loyal" to an employer, who will lay you off the minute profits deteriorate.
    My current employer will doc my pay for being 1 minute late from a break, but refuses to acknowledge that I have started my shift early on numerous occasions without asking for additional pay. I have also stayed past my shift without additional pay, due to being understaffed. I have also come in on my days off and worked on weekends, when asked to. My reward for being a consciencious worker-zero- and not even a written acknowledgement in my yearly evaluations.

    Loyalty is a 2 way street.

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