Are You Board Certified?

  1. I have to admit. I have not really seen very much of this except for CCRN. I have not heard of a nurse Board Certified for med/surg. I just got the information (from ANA) about the dates for the certification testing (May and October).

    Anyone have this or other certification? How do you study for this? Is it beneficial?

    Thank you,

    B.
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   nightingale
    Here is the URL for the list of Certifications through ANCC:

    http://nursingworld.org/ancc/certify/cert/list.htm


    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated!

    B.
  4. by   NRSKarenRN
    Board certified in Med Surg in 1980s.....let it lapse since in home health in late 90's. Looking into Home Health certification this year.

    There is a bigger nursing world than is reflected on this BB. Certification is just one means of validateing your knowedge base and helps open up employment doors.
  5. by   nightingale
    How Exciting... I am finding a bigger world..... Karen... do you recommend the review tapes etc... pricey... but they sound VERY valuable.... I may go for it.. it will look good on my resume (and be fun to do in the lag time)... lol

    Bonnie
  6. by   NRSKarenRN
    Didn't use tapes. Knew my areas of weakness e.g. signs and syptoms metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, neuro cranial nerve assessment and studied them. Had taken Resp ICU and CCU course at the hospital so I reviewed that material along with med surg text book. If you've been involved in inservices, understand nursing process inside and out, know when to delegate, should do fine. It was the easiest test I'd ever taken.
  7. by   wrightgd
    There are two certifications for Occupational Health Nursing -- COHN and COHN-S. The difference between them is the the "S" requires a bachelors degree, and is more management based. Requirements are experience in the field, continuing education credits, and of course to pass the board exam.

    For more info go to www.abohn.org and for more info on Occupational Health Nursing go to www.aaohn.org

    I am certified as a COHN-S

    Thanks,
    GDW
  8. by   pattyjo
    Hi Bonnie: Certified in psych-mental health, as are most of my co-workers. Employers do look at certification both as a validation of your knowledge, and also as evidence of a commitment on your part to excellence in your specialty.
    I didn't use tapes, did look at a review book, mostly to see the kinds of questions to anticipate. Many of the questions are practice-based, so if you have sound experience in your field, plus review as Karen suggested, you will do fine.
    Good luck!
    Patty
  9. by   NRSKarenRN
    Employers do look at certification both as a validation of your knowledge, and also as evidence of a commitment on your part to excellence in your specialty.
    Pattyjo stated it the best!

  10. by   Q.
    I am an OB/GYN nurse, and chose NOT to get certified in my area. Why? I see it as an extra liability (especially in L&D) without ANY extra compensation for the knowledge.

    Just my opinion.
  11. by   SharonH, RN
    Originally posted by Susy K
    I am an OB/GYN nurse, and chose NOT to get certified in my area. Why? I see it as an extra liability (especially in L&D) without ANY extra compensation for the knowledge.

    Just my opinion.

    Just out of curiosity, how can it be an extra liability? This is a sincere question, I've never heard that before.
  12. by   SharonH, RN
    Nightingale, are we on the same wavelength or what? I too am planning to sit for my certification in May. I'm going to just study by reviewing nursing journals, and boning up on my weak spots. I just have to come up with all that money!
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by SharonMH31



    Just out of curiosity, how can it be an extra liability? This is a sincere question, I've never heard that before.
    Here is an example.
    As an L&D nurse you can get certified in EFM (electronic fetal monitoring) which is something above and beyond what your average L&D nurse knows. All L&D nurses are trained in EFM interpretation - but the "certification" is an extra step.

    EFM interpretation is difficult and subjective enough - and if you don't catch the subtle clues of fetal distress, you can liable - even MORE so than your average L&D nurse because you are EFM Certifiied. When babies are born with cerebral palsy, people can get very emotional and as a result, start a lawsuit.

    When you are the only person monitoring this strip, and your attending is counting on YOU to call him with the signs of fetal distress - this can be a very touchy thing.
  14. by   Jenny P
    I've been a CCRN off and on since 1977. I took the test each time I renewed or decided to recertify except the last time when I recertified by doing CEU's. I will recertify this time by CEUs also: the test is definitely becoming harder each time.I've maintianed my CCRN for 9 years this time, and do not plan to let it lapse again. I first took the test just to prove to myself that I did know something. There is quite a number of RNs on my unit who are CCRNs, and we have at least 1 or 2 who have certifications in over areas. One of our Assistant Head Nurses is certified in Gerontology.

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Are You Board Certified?