are "fake nails" okay for nurses? - page 11

I am a nursing student graduating next month. I wore "fake nails" before nursing school, but my program did not allow them during school. I am considering getting them again after graduation. ... Read More

  1. by   fd5151
    Quote from Ruffles
    I am a nursing student graduating next month. I wore "fake nails" before nursing school, but my program did not allow them during school. I am considering getting them again after graduation. What is your opinion and the policies at the facilities where you work? Are they a health hazaard to patients if proper handwashing precautions are used? Have you read any studies on the "fake nail" issue?
    Whether long nails are fake or acrylic, they allow for bacteria to spread a lot easier onto your hands. I remembered that whenever i thought about my own nails and now i would keep them short irregardless.
    Depends on your hospital's policy. Don't you think it would kind of be a hassle in patient care. Could end up giving someone a bit of a scratch.:wink2:
  2. by   ortess1971
    My hospital just came out with a dress code that states that acrylic nails are banned. We are allowed to wear nail polish,(even in the OR) if there are no chips. You won't catch me in a nail salon ever again, upscale or not. The last one I went to, 6 years ago, the nail tech gave me serious attitude because I didn't want her to cut my cuticles. You can never be sure that they clean their tools properly either. Once in a while, I'll polish mine myself but I think its a pain in the butt to always be on a "chip alert". IMHO, acrylic nails or long natural nails have no place in nursing-they're unhygenic and look cheap and tacky in many cases. Just my 2 cents.
  3. by   HappyNurse82
    Quote from nightcaller
    Wear gloves. Wash hands. Good grief.
    Thank you !!!!
  4. by   CV_RN
    I haven't read through all these replies yet, but acrylic nails should not be worn because pseudomonas is known to harbor in the glue used for acrylic nails
  5. by   BSNtobe2009
    The "fake nails" ban in clinicals is causing a degree of anxiety with me.

    I have very odd looking hands, and if there was a plastic surgery to correct my hands, there is no price to high that I wouldn't be willing to pay. It has been the cause of lifelong embarrassment to me.

    My fingers, are unusually short and fat for my stature, my nail beds, are very wide, and short. They are not even a 1/4 of an inch deep. Before fake nails become popular and affordable, when I would go on dates, I actually had guys to comment on my hands, women did the same, and they all said, "why don't you let your nails grow out".

    The truth is, they won't. They grow very slow, and when they do, they are paper thin and just rip off. I have had fake nails for 10 or 12 years and go for fill-ins every 1 1/2 weeks, and replace the set completely about every 2 months. I keep them "active length", with a french manicure, none of this funky polish thing. I don't have a problem with them breaking.

    So, there are reason of why some women wear them. If I have nice hands that are even acceptable, trust me, you would never see me in another nail salon b/c the "habit" is expensive and time consuming, but it's the only way I know to fix, what I consider to be a deformity.
  6. by   AfloydRN
    They were not allowed @ our hospital, however 90 % of our managerment staff had them. If noone enforces it....I have hypothyroidism and my nails tear and bleed. Thats not much different than fake nails.
  7. by   puggymae
    Fake nails are not allowed in the facility where I take students to clinical. In fact one day while we were there the infection control nurse came around and looked at everyone's hands on the floor - that included housekeepers, lab tech, the Nurse Manager, all the tech's and nurses, myself and the students. 3 staff members (a CNA, 2 RN's) with artifical nails were written up, sent home, and told not to come back to work until the nails were gone. They were also told that if there was a next time they would be fired. It goes against OSHA standards and infection control policies for the facility.
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    The "fake nails" ban in clinicals is causing a degree of anxiety with me.

    I have very odd looking hands, and if there was a plastic surgery to correct my hands, there is no price to high that I wouldn't be willing to pay. It has been the cause of lifelong embarrassment to me.

    My fingers, are unusually short and fat for my stature, my nail beds, are very wide, and short. They are not even a 1/4 of an inch deep. Before fake nails become popular and affordable, when I would go on dates, I actually had guys to comment on my hands, women did the same, and they all said, "why don't you let your nails grow out".

    The truth is, they won't. They grow very slow, and when they do, they are paper thin and just rip off. I have had fake nails for 10 or 12 years and go for fill-ins every 1 1/2 weeks, and replace the set completely about every 2 months. I keep them "active length", with a french manicure, none of this funky polish thing. I don't have a problem with them breaking.

    So, there are reason of why some women wear them. If I have nice hands that are even acceptable, trust me, you would never see me in another nail salon b/c the "habit" is expensive and time consuming, but it's the only way I know to fix, what I consider to be a deformity.

    This reason isn't outweighing the risk presented to the pts. though.
  9. by   BSNtobe2009
    I never said it didn't I was just stating that there is a reason why some people wear them.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from BSNtobe2009
    I never said it didn't I was just stating that there is a reason why some people wear them.
    I'm well aware of that. I had them put on for my wedding, and wore them for 14 days. But i also wasn't at work, and soaked them off 2 days before i returned, buffed the real ones smooth and put a clear coat of polish on.

    My natural nails and hands look like crap, but that's also my opinion, and i really don't think that my opinion of the physical appearance of my natural hands and nails should be reason enough for me to put on fake nails (short or long), made of a material that has been proven to harbor bacteria and fungus, and put my pts. at risk. It's not worth the risks or the possible consequences.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Oct 15, '06
  11. by   Iridescent Orchid
    I just recently got acrylics, to go ahead and get it out of the way. I've been wanting them for a while, but I just haven't ever took the plunge. I figured I have from now 'til the beginning of January to get them out of my system. LOL, I am taking my core classes and then I am going to get them removed once I start my actual programs and clinicals. I don't want them getting in my way, plus the whole germ issue is something I feel very strongly about as a part of Nursing, I don't feel any type of fake nails should be worn while on the job, it only leaves room for problems.
  12. by   auschk
    i have had acrylic nails since i was 16 recently changed profession moving into age care after being at my facility over 12 months staff were told that all false nails were to be removed. i did remove them for a period of time but because my natural nail is brittle and damaged i had them put back on. My problem is as mentioned in a previous post my acrylic nails are always kept short and no colour on them filed every day to make sure they are smooth. the only time that i have ever caused a skin tear was when i didn't have them on. we had an infection control training afternoon and i was one of the only ones that showed a good result after the handwashing exercise. to say that acrylic nails look unprofessional i personally think is ridiculous.
  13. by   xtxrn
    Personal feeling- they're germ traps (and worse) for nurses.... I don't have any opposition to them for people who don't work in healthcare, but find them a great way to either bring bugs home, or from home.....

    If nails are done fairly short, I don't think that's a problem- but the 1 inch long, curled ones- uh, no.... JMHO

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