Are Nurses Supported by Management?

  1. Hi Ya'll

    First of all, I have found this website to be AWESOME! I want to thank everyone who gave me responses and opinions and info etc!! I greatly appreciate it!
    I am interested in helping others. I have read some things on this website such as making medical mistakes, patients getting angry at nurses, work overload etc.
    I was just wondering if the majority of nurses are supported by management/higher ups if some problem occurs. I have worked in education setting where I did NOT feel supported. If nursing is the same environment and there is a lot of bullying going on by management, then I don't think I will pursue it.
    I know there are good days and bad days. I know there are good supervisors and bad supervisors. But as a whole, are nurses SUPPORTED?
    God Bless Each and Every One of YOU!!!!!!
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   BBFRN
    Like any other profession, I think it depends on where you work. I feel supported by management where I work, for the most part. The thing about nurses is, if we don't feel supported, we can easily leave and find a job anywhere- one where we do feel supported. Or at least one where we feel supported enough to make us stay. It's been my experience that most bullying comes more from coworkers than managers...I had a bullying manager in the past, but she was more of a passive-aggressive, I-never-told-you-that kind of manager. She was also a kind of my-way-or-the-highway kind of manager. This would have worked for her had she been more respected by her staff. Within a year, most of us chose the highway.
  4. by   llg
    You are probably going to get a lot of people who use this thread as an opportunity to blow off steam about how they hate their boss. That's a favorite pasttime. So, remember that as you read the other posts. People complain loud and clear whenever something does not go the way the would like it to go. They pretty much don't notice it when things are going smoothly -- and their boss is supporting them in a hundred different little ways.

    As you said, there are good days and bad days, good bosses and bad bosses, etc. However, the general rule of thumb is that a hospital does not want to get sued -- and they don't want to lose a lot of staff or get into additional trouble by victimizing an employee who has made a mistake. There is no financial incentive for a hospital to NOT support an employee when a mistake is made that could lead to a lawsuit. So, they are usualy "on your side" for the big things. In an actual law suit, they don't dare NOT support their staff in most cases.

    However, they are "on your case" frequently for little errors, sloppy practices, etc. that could lead to big problems if not prevented. Patient safety is one of the top priorities and if your practice does not meet their standards, they will insisit you improve. That means following all procedures to the letter, documenting everything in triplicate, etc. Some people perceive that as "non-supportive," especially when staff shortages, poor working conditions, etc. make it virtually impossible to do everything in exactly the approved way.

    While your question is legitimate, I think it would get predominantly negative answers no matter what profession you were investigating. That's just human nature.

    llg
  5. by   reyna
    NOT by our facility's management we're basically on our own.
  6. by   RNPATL
    I am not always sure if it is a lack of support by management or a general lack of understanding about what nurses really do. Over the years, I have worked for some really talented nurse managers .... these are the managers that battle to battle and recognize and understand the tools and equipment that nurses need to be successful and meet patient needs. These nurse managers represent their nurses very well. When working for a leader like this, I have always felt supported and in fact, have never had any problems getting what I needed to do my job. This would include; staff, supplies, equipment that works, etc.

    Conversly, I believe there are nurse managers that simply do not have a clue about how to represent their unit and frequently are "YES" men to the upper executive level. This translates into poor working conditions for nurses, meaning not enough staff, lack of supplies and equipment, etc. Unfortunately, this also impacts the patient in a negative way.

    So to answer your question, I really think it truly depends on the nurse manager and how well he or she is able to represent the unit and fight for what is needed. IMHO
  7. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from reyna
    NOT by our facility's management we're basically on our own.
    Same here. Our managers are given a performance bonus pay, if their work units meet a specific criteria- In other words, we do all the hard work, yet management gets the financial rewards.

    The Managers who come to our work center usually do not have any experience in our specialty area, and upper management doesn't seen to think it's a problem. Unfortunately, it is a problem, because the manager doesn't have any experience and is supposed to be rating our performance, when that same manager has never performed the job and many times, can't even do the basics.
  8. by   zenman
    Posted by RNPATL: I am not always sure if it is a lack of support by management or a general lack of understanding about what nurses really do.
    Hospital CEOs should have nursing degrees also so they would have more of a clue.

    Conversly, I believe there are nurse managers that simply do not have a clue about how to represent their unit and frequently are "YES" men to the upper executive level. This translates into poor working conditions for nurses, meaning not enough staff, lack of supplies and equipment, etc. Unfortunately, this also impacts the patient in a negative way.
    I think managers should have more training in management. Even if you have come up through the ranks and know nursing, business is another world and it helps to speak the language.

    I'm a supervisor right now and I help out as much as possible. Just got back from a M/S floor helping a nurse move a patient to another room as the CNAs were too busy.

    I did work at one hospital where I never met the DON! Did see the CEO several times though...sad.

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