Are nurses more objective because of their exposure to death?

  1. I have one quick question.

    Last year I put up a research website for a book examing the affair as an effective therapy in marriage. Actually, the thesis did not start out there, it just kinda worked in that direction.
    I have not advertised the website, but I have received quite a number of responses. A great number of those responses have been from nurses. Question: Do you think occupations, such as yours and perhaps police and soldiers, which are closer to death than most have a more objective outlook on affairs--more realistic?

    Well, maybe one more question (don't mean to come off like Columbo). Do nurses have a trade magazine or a common website?

    Lee Marshall
    Springville, Utah.
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   tinkertoys
    I fail to see the connection between the breaking of a sacred vow between a husband and wife, and the unpredictability of our lives ( and death). I fail to see how a relationship outside of a marriage can do anything but add to an existing mistrust and feeling of betrayal. Because of our constant reminders of the fragility and impermanence of life, the relationships we have should become even more precious to us. I know that whatever I may see through the course of the day, I have a husband who will be there to support and comfort me...as I am for him. I know many people who have used the traumas they see as excuses for infidelity and promescuity....beyond the pleasure of the moment, it has caused nothing but heartache. We need to instead view the tragedies around us as reminders of how blessed we truly are!
  4. by   Lee_Marshall
    Originally posted by tinkertoys:
    I fail to see the connection between the breaking of a sacred vow between a husband and wife, and the unpredictability of our lives ( and death). I fail to see how a relationship outside of a marriage can do anything but add to an existing mistrust and feeling of betrayal. Because of our constant reminders of the fragility and impermanence of life, the relationships we have should become even more precious to us. I know that whatever I may see through the course of the day, I have a husband who will be there to support and comfort me...as I am for him. I know many people who have used the traumas they see as excuses for infidelity and promescuity....beyond the pleasure of the moment, it has caused nothing but heartache. We need to instead view the tragedies around us as reminders of how blessed we truly are!
    **********

    The basis for my question was a curious trend found when the occupations of the respondents and their views were compared. Occupations such as Nurses, Police (including Sheriff) and Soldiers seem to have a more objective viewpoint on affairs than, say, the housewife or secretary. Life experiences, their exposure to the "fragility and impermanence" of life, was one possible explanation I had considered. The question was a seed for a hypothesis, not a hypothesis. It was also a memory spike for anyone who may have read of any studies I have yet to find-- a shortcut for me (This is a tough subject and I may very well be in over my head).
    All marriages, like all people, are not the same and cannot be compared one on one. Many women cannot boast the same emotional and physical support you can in your marriage and relationships. Some just aren't that "lucky". For one to say: "If you are not happy, get a divorce", is a simple choice for one person to make for another-- is it not?


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