Are LPNs the Answer to the RN Shortage in Some Locations? - page 3

AN had the opportunity to talk with multiple healthcare systems throughout the US at a national conference. Many had the same issue: not enough RNs. Some had sign on bonuses - up to $10,000 for... Read More

  1. by   LovingLife123
    There is a shortage of nurses in certain areas of the country. Those crying there is not are uninformed. Unfortunately, LPNs are not the answer in my state. They have a limited scope of practice and cannot complete assessments.

    My answer is to pay RNs more money and support them more. There also needs to be better schooling to better prepare our new grads. Stop making it all about NCLEX.
  2. by   Archerlpvn
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    What's the reason?
    Oh really? No theory eh? That's a loaded, bold and absolutely ridiculous statement about LPNs. Idk if you ever went through an LPN program, but I know I did, and theory was definitely a heavy component in our program. Not so say we went as in depth as an RN program would, but please don't make insulting comments like that. I'm a licensed nurse, not a technician, thank you.
  3. by   JKL33
    Quote from Archerlpvn
    Oh really? No theory eh? That's a loaded, bold and absolutely ridiculous statement about LPNs. Idk if you ever went through an LPN program, but I know I did, and theory was definitely a heavy component in our program. Not so say we went as in depth as an RN program would, but please don't make insulting comments like that. I'm a licensed nurse, not a technician, thank you.
    I think you have replied to the wrong poster?
  4. by   Archerlpvn
    Quote from JKL33
    I think you have replied to the wrong poster?
    I did. Sorry! It's hard to reply accurately sometimes with my tiny phone lol.
  5. by   Flames9_RN
    I believe what 1 province back in Canada is doing, or attempting to do is changing the scope of practice for LPNs. They give them the training and viola they can then do that skill.....and get paid less than a RN......
  6. by   muggs
    Quote from Tommy5677
    LPNs are definitely not the answer. The answer is to stop with the "BSN required/preferred" nonsense as an excuse to not hire ADNs and/or pay them less money. Remember, all 3 entry levels take the same test and if you want the ADN to somehow be less of a nurse, then give them a different test. Also, remember that the extras the BSN has, such as research and community health, are not on the test. That's for a reason. LPNs have one year of training with little to no theory. They're technicians, not professionals.No, they are not the answer. There are a lot of ADNs out there waiting for you to hire them.
    Oooohh that's why my name hasn't popped up on the office of professions website, I thought it was because I just passed the NCLEX last week. Can someone point me to the office of technicians website?
  7. by   rzyzzy
    When a lawyer, or the state refers to you as a "professional" - it's nearly always so they can add responsibilities to you, sue you, make you work overtime without compensation, or otherwise mistreat you without paying you for the privilege.

    This is one perfect example of the skilled *trade* of nursing cutting it's own throat by referring to themselves as "professionals". I also hold a real-estate license & they like to call themselves "professionals" too, and it's (frankly) bull. If you can get your license with a 40-hour online class, you're not a "professional", and if you're subject to stepping in poop at work, you're not a professional - you're a (skilled) tradesperson. At the master's level of education- if you're *not* at the bedside, using the term "professional" is appropriate and valid.

    Words mean something & "professional" in the US means something other than a compliment. At best, it's stolen valor & at worst, it's playing into a legal mine field that doesn't end well for nurses. Taking the title of "professional" is no different legally than accepting the "manager" tag - once you let your boss stick one on your shirt, you get the pleasure of unlimited overtime without compensation.

    TLDR; you should be rejecting the "professional" tag if you know what's good for you.
  8. by   muggs
    I know. I don't care what I'm referred to as I was just being a wise***.
  9. by   MrsNurse08
    LPN=N stands for nurse RN=N stands for nurse
    We all save lives and we all are medical professionals.
  10. by   lvnforschool
    My experience-
    I am a LVN in California. I graduated, and it was nearly impossible to find work. Everyone wanted a (year) experience. My first and only job, has been working for a school district in the health office. Now when I try to look for work I am meet with 2 huge obstacles. #1- the employer is discouraged by the fact that I am not using my (skills). #2- the pay for LVN in assisted living (SNF) really is low. Its almost $10 lower than the wage I am currently making, and for more work. So I have decided that I am stuck working this school job because I am not desired in the real world of nursing.

    Just my point of view

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