Are LPNs the Answer to the RN Shortage in Some Locations? - page 2

AN had the opportunity to talk with multiple healthcare systems throughout the US at a national conference. Many had the same issue: not enough RNs. Some had sign on bonuses - up to $10,000 for... Read More

  1. by   adventure_rn
    Quote from GoodDay2017
    I wish there was a list somewhere of all these openings, with sign on bonuses, that will also take new grads. I know many new grads BSN's who would relocate if there was assistance to help them.
    From what I've seen, it is not typical for new grads to get signing bonuses; it's almost exclusively for experienced nurses. This occurs because a unit will spend a ton of money (tens of thousands of dollars) to orient a new grad, whereas experienced nurses require a much shorter, cheaper orientation. Receiving an expensive new grad orientation is your signing bonus.

    There is also a ton of competition for most new grad hospital jobs (depending on your location). Based on supply and demand, there's no reason to pay an incentive bonus for a job that tons of new grads are competing for. In fact, many new grad jobs require that nurses sign a contract to commit to the hospital for a certain number of years; if the new grad breaks the contact, they can owe the hospital up to $5,000. It's kind of like a reverse signing bonus (maybe a 'signing debt'?).

    There doesn't appear to be a shortage of overall nurses. Rather, there's a surplus of new grads due to the increase in nursing programs, and a simultaneous shortage of experienced nurses due to burnout, turn-over, and attrition.
  2. by   Julius Seizure
    adventure_rn, BSN, I love your avatar so much...its adorable!
  3. by   adventure_rn
    Quote from Julius Seizure
    adventure_rn, BSN, I love your avatar so much...its adorable!
    Aww, thank you!! Every time I look at it, it reminds me of why I love NICU nursing. She's a little 34-weeker whose picture went viral last year after parents posted it on their blog. Now she's a beautiful little smiley toddler (more info/pics in the articles below). Love it.

    http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2016/1...y-viral-smile/

    Preemie Inspires Parents With Dazzling Smile 5 Days After Birth - ABC News
  4. by   sallyrnrrt
    In my over 4+ decades of being an RN, I have worked with some exceptional Lvns even in critical care....
  5. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Archerlpvn
    Texas, while it may have a very "specific" list of what LPNs can and cannot do, still has a very wide scope of practice for LVNs. They can perform focused assessments, IV push certain medications and I believe they can infuse medications into both peripheral and central lines in adult patients when they complete the "IV cert." Don't know about you, but that sounds pretty wide to me considering most restrictions with LPNs/LVNs occur in assessment ability and IV therapy practice.
    I have read all the Texas BON position statements on LVN scope. I disagree that the LVN has a "wide" scope. Just a matter of opinion on how to define the word "wide."
  6. by   Archerlpvn
    Quote from Horseshoe
    I have read all the Texas BON position statements on LVN scope. I disagree that the LVN has a "wide" scope. Just a matter of opinion on how to define the word "wide."
    That's fine, as an LPN who has practiced in multiple states, often in states with much more restrictive scopes of practice, I know that in general, it is "wider."
  7. by   CKPM2RN
    I would like to hear other's opinions on hours and schedules as it relates to a nurse shortage.

    My story is that because of family issues I can only work part-time and I've had trouble finding work that is not full-time. I'm working LTC/SNF right now because of the employer is willing to have part-time staff. (2 or 3 8hr/per week) I don't want to go part-time agency only because I prefer to have one place of employment.

    An anecdotal story I have (take it for what it's worth) is a local facility with a very large, varied campus is short staffed and desperate but won't consider part-time personnel. I know a lot of other nurses who would prefer part-time, per diem and other flex schedules. Why the stiffness in scheduling? Any managers out there have an answer or is this a managerial (never been a healthcare provider) issue?
    Last edit by CKPM2RN on Sep 23 : Reason: Poor sentence structure.
  8. by   Tommy5677
    LPNs are definitely not the answer. The answer is to stop with the "BSN required/preferred" nonsense as an excuse to not hire ADNs and/or pay them less money. Remember, all 3 entry levels take the same test and if you want the ADN to somehow be less of a nurse, then give them a different test. Also, remember that the extras the BSN has, such as research and community health, are not on the test. That's for a reason. LPNs have one year of training with little to no theory. They're technicians, not professionals. No, they are not the answer. There are a lot of ADNs out there waiting for you to hire them.
  9. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from CKPM2RN
    I would like to hear other's opinions on hours and schedules as it relates to a nurse shortage.

    My story is that because of family issues I can only work part-time and I've had trouble finding work that is not full-time. I'm working LTC/SNF right now because of the employer is willing to have part-time staff. (2 or 3 8hr/per week) I don't want to go part-time agency only because I prefer to have one place of employment.

    An anecdotal story I have (take it for what it's worth) is a local facility with a very large, varied campus is short staffed and desperate but won't consider part-time personnel. I know a lot of other nurses who would prefer part-time, per diem and other flex schedules. Why the stiffness in scheduling? Any managers out there have an answer or is this a managerial (never been a healthcare provider) issue?
    I've never been a manager, but could it be because of benefits? Hiring 6 part time staff who all get benefits in some amount, vs. hiring 4 full time staff and only having to provide benefits to 4 people?
  10. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from Tommy5677
    LPNs are definitely not the answer. The answer is to stop with the "BSN required/preferred" nonsense as an excuse to not hire ADNs and/or pay them less money. Remember, all 3 entry levels take the same test and if you want the ADN to somehow be less of a nurse, then give them a different test. Also, remember that the extras the BSN has, such as research and community health, are not on the test. That's for a reason. LPNs have one year of training with little to no theory. They're technicians, not professionals. No, they are not the answer. There are a lot of ADNs out there waiting for you to hire them.
    What's the reason?
  11. by   kbrn2002
    Sigh, too bad this is devolving into an LPN vs ADN vs BSN debate. Invoking the ANA sure didn't help. I'm also on the anti-ANA bandwagon as I don't think they do a darn thing to help nursing as a profession unless it's fits within their very constrained definitions.

    I do find it interesting that at least some health care systems are trying to be more creative with staffing. Personally I think hiring some LPN 's and providing the means to help them become RN's is both helping a short term staffing crunch and ensuring a few more RN's for their facility long term. Sounds like a win-win to me.
  12. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Horseshoe
    I have read all the Texas BON position statements on LVN scope. I disagree that the LVN has a "wide" scope. Just a matter of opinion on how to define the word "wide."
    I've only worked in Texas and California and Texas does seem very wide, to me. In California, they barely allow LVNs to breathe. And the few hospitals I've worked at have restricted them even further than the state.
  13. by   spunkymoo
    Thank you for this article. I am a clinical nursing instructor for PN students, and I can tell you that their training is very rigorous. Unfortunately the LPN/LVN is under appreciated and under utilized. How can we ignore this when there is such a shortage of nurses?

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