are labs a chore or what

  1. today i had 19 patients on 2 units that had lab work done - our policy is to fax the docs with the new lab values - and the last set of lab values - add to that fax pertinent medications related to labs - then to check them off on a TAR that we received the lab report and on a worksheet that we did indeed notifiy the doc - and then on another sheet that is for physician notification for any patient problems so new orders can be second checked - for my 19 patients with labs it took almost 3 hours to get all of the information together and write orders as they came in - do any of you time conversing nurses out there have any ideas as to how some of this can be eliminated so i can have some time with my patients and not just with paperwork?
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  2. 2 Comments

  3. by   crissrn27
    This was usually a supervisor or the ADONs job in the LTC places I worked. If I did it I did the critical ones one day, the others on subsequent days, and left some for the other shifts to do. If you are managing a hall or unit, you don't have time to do stuff like this by yourself! The other nurses can help write out and fax stuff, just because the doc isn't there right then is no excuse not to, they will get in the AM and respond.
  4. by   Rizpah
    At my facility, the RN supervisor takes care of the labs. We have program in our computer system where we are able to type in our concern, for example - new labs, give info regarding the last lab for comparison, what the current meds are and ask doctor, "Any changes?" We then print it out and fax it to doc. Doc receives it, writes a response on the bottom and faxes back. Ward clerk enters the order, notifies pharmacy and gives it back to the RN for noting (double check and sign off) We have computerized NN and MAR so it all goes quickly with researching last labs and current meds and such. Still all told, big lab draw days, such as right before MD rounds are a pain in the yazooo.

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