Are CNA's considered "Nurses"? - page 9

I am a new nurse but was a CNA for 15 years before going to school. I was never referred to as a nurse when I was a CNA. I recently went to work in a Doc office where the CNA refers to herself as a... Read More

  1. by   barbiedee
    CNA's calling themselves 'nurses' is what this thread is about, not the value or job description of a CNA. It all boils down to the right for a nursing assistant to call him or herself a nurse. Which, from what I am reading here, is unacceptable pretty much everywhere. There is a role for all health care providers, from CNA's, LPN's, RN's, BSN's, RT's, RPN's....it's just the 'false advertising' I object to. I worked hard for the right to call myself a nurse. Its not a title which just anyone can use. Its a right, and a privilege that not all are entitled to.
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from SCRN1
    I understand what you're saying, but assisting the nurse IS what a CNA does. The CNA is doing certain duties that they are allowed to do which frees up the nurse to do everything else. If the CNA duties are not done, then it falls back on the nurse assigned to that patient. The nurse doesn't actually have to be in the room to be "assisted".
    I am well aware that it's ultimately the nurse's responsibility (duh), but i still do not believe that what a CNA does as all 'assisting'.
  3. by   Energizer Bunny
    Maybe they shouldn't be called "assistants"?
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I like the title Patient Care Techs (or associates in some places)

    very appropriate and very much far-removed from nursing. Works for me.
  5. by   tabh
    I think the title should be changed to Tech or Aide but for what it's worth CNAs do assist nurses. I think CNAs in hospitals should be called Patient Techs/Aides and CNAs in LTC should be called Resident Techs/Aides. Or how about just "Health Consumer Aide." :chuckle Before I was a CNA I worked as just an aide and one day a resident needed something - I forget what - and she said to them "Come with me and I'll take care of you. I'm the nurse; I'll fix it." :imbar I couldn't believe she said that. It was very dangerous and unprofessional of her. She misrepresented herself and overstepped the scope of her certification, even though whatever care she gave was not out of the scope of her certification. Even though she was otherwise a good CNA I don't think girls like her should be aides because they obviously don't know their role.
  6. by   KacyLynnRN
    Quote from Alnamvet
    You are right...just like the N in CNA....and the N in NA....and like the N in NT....a CNA and a LPN just doesn't cut it anymore; get over it....feel slighted? that's on you...get used to it :stone


    You know Alnamvet...you sound like on of the RN's I would hate to work with...an RN who has never been anything but an RN and has no idea where LPN's, CNA's, etc. are coming from, and therefore treat them like crap...I hate working with people like you!
    I for one was a CNA for 3 years, an LPN for 2 years, and will graduate with my RN in a few months. I am sure with my background I would never treat others in the healthcare field the way you do. Maybe you need to get a kick in the butt to cure your RNitis you seem to be suffering from. :stone
  7. by   barbiedee
    Alnamvet...what an attitude! With health care budgets and costs the way they are, do you realize what an all RN/BSN/MSN staff would cost???? Check out the pay scale for a CNA or LPN then do the math. If a facility worked with the same budget and had to hire only RN's you can bet your sweet patooty that the patient load would be double. Translate...you'd have to do all the scut work and ADL's for twice the number of patients. As well as the "RN only" work the RN's presently do. I'd love to find out where that "i'm greater than thou" attitude came from. You sure you're not a doctor???
  8. by   barbiedee
    Oh, by the way...did anyone notice that Alnamvet has been banned from postings? Hmmm...wonder why?:chuckle
  9. by   kimburlynn
    Wow, though I think a CNA should never refer to her/himself as a nurse they definetly do ALOT of the nursing in my opinion.When my Dad had heart surgery we hardly saw the RN's in charge of him mostly the CNA's and LPN's.If all we had was RN's on that floor I wonder what level of care he would have received.I am hoping one day to be an RN and I have respected the profession since childhood.Kudos to you wonderful RN's out there who respect ALL your valuable helpers and shame on you ones that dont.:uhoh21:
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from kimburlynn
    Wow, though I think a CNA should never refer to her/himself as a nurse they definetly do ALOT of the nursing in my opinion.When my Dad had heart surgery we hardly saw the RN's in charge of him mostly the CNA's and LPN's.If all we had was RN's on that floor I wonder what level of care he would have received.I am hoping one day to be an RN and I have respected the profession since childhood.Kudos to you wonderful RN's out there who respect ALL your valuable helpers and shame on you ones that dont.:uhoh21:
    The floor my dad was on (Vascular Med-Surg) was nothing but RNs, and no aides at all. They were great.
  11. by   Amylcd
    To the person who said there is no need for CNA's... I would LOVE to see you do that job and still have time for your duties as an RN. Thats like saying there are no need for nurses, doctors can do it all on their own. RN/LPN's are assistants to them, as CNA's are assistants to the nurses.
  12. by   Lindsay112
    I'm thinking about getting my CNA, but I don't know where I can do that. Also, how long does the program take and what does it cost? Can anybody help me out?
  13. by   barefootlady
    The best places I have ever worked have considered cna's a valuable part of the team. They were quick to identify themselves as cna's and quick to spot problems and report them to the nurse. I did do primary care, I loved it, of course we only had 4 patients, we would buddy up and do the baths, treatments, IV's. dressings, and give our own po meds. Every hour we were expected to check our boxes for new orders, and if we had a stat then the unit clerk informed us of a stat orders. The patient satisfaction was very high but the hospital did away with this system in short time, too much difficulty in staffing was their reason, but money was the bottom line. Pay for the RN was eating up budgets. Oh, the doctors loved it too. The same nurse had the same group of patients for about a week or until discharge or transfer, orders were not overlooked, change in condition was noted and reported, IV meds were on time and so were tests. Wow, how I miss those good old days.

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