Are CNA's considered "Nurses"? - page 8

I am a new nurse but was a CNA for 15 years before going to school. I was never referred to as a nurse when I was a CNA. I recently went to work in a Doc office where the CNA refers to herself as a... Read More

  1. by   mscsrjhm
    Dearest Alnamvet,

    Rocking the boat? The full moon is definitely utilizing it's powers. Methinks you are getting too much enjoyment watching the ripple 'affect'. (although emphasizing "emt" was a bit much, as they have less training than CNA-an obvious give-away. Why give us that much of a clue toward your motive?)
    Anxiously awaiting your next move.

    Mschrisco
  2. by   hogan4736
    Quote from Mschrisco
    Dearest Alnamvet,

    Rocking the boat? The full moon is definitely utilizing it's powers. Methinks you are getting too much enjoyment watching the ripple 'affect'. (although emphasizing "emt" was a bit much, as they have less training than CNA-an obvious give-away. Why give us that much of a clue toward your motive?)
    Anxiously awaiting your next move.

    Mschrisco

    EMTs have 8-12 months of education...CNAs have 3-6 weeks...you do the math...

    I respect CNAs, as their work is very arduous...Comparing EMTs and CNAs is like comparing a medic and a nurse (nurse would include LPN)
  3. by   Motivated, SN
    DESIDERATA
    "Go placidly amid the noise and the haste, and remember what peace there may
    be in silence. As far as possible without surrender be on good terms with all
    persons. Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the
    dull and ignorant, they too have their story. Avoid loud and aggressive
    persons, they are vexations to the spirit. If you compare yourself with others,
    you may become vain or bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser
    persons than yourself."..... No, CNA's/MA's are not nurses. LPN's/RN's are nurses. Doctors in medical offices are ultimately responsible for the actions of their
    unlicensed personnel. Many duties, not all, that are performed by CNA's, MA's,
    LPN's, RN's are legally the same. Unlicensed personnel who call themselves
    nurses and nurses who bash other professionals are operating from the same corner,
    "low self-esteem". Unfortunately, in our society has evolved to a point where
    we use titles to define who we are; instead of us realizing we are are all people, with
    different interests, skills, abilities, advantages and disadvantages. Sorry this
    is so long, just had to add my two cents.
  4. by   Michelleroth1
    As a CNA Im careful to remind patients Im not the (Nurse RN or LPN whomever Im working with) As im working my way through school I have enough to worry about without the BON breathing down my neck LOL. Im just the assistant right now. When I earn my title I will happy to be called nurse.
  5. by   holineRN
    [font=Comic Sans MS]CNA are not considered nurses. Anyone who represent him/herself as a nurse can be sue for fraud. This a law in my country. BTW, I am a foreign graduate nurse. I moved in United States 3 years ago and I have been a nurse in my homeland for 11 years. I started as a CNA in the US. I went to 2 weeks training, took the test to be able to work as a CNA while I was waiting on my papers to take the Nursing Board. While I was a CNA, I never made any action related to nsg. practice, never sit inside the nurse station, never touch any pt. chart. I practce within my CNA scope. Infact, I quit wearing my college ring until I got my RN license. During this period, technically and by education and by heart I am a nurse but legally I was not.
  6. by   Jennifer03275
    I myself am a Licensed Nurse Assistant in New Hampshire (we are now licensed instead of certified). We are NOT considered nurses. I also think it is fradulent to claim to be a nurse when you are not. Nurses go through an incredible amount of schooling to be able to call themselves a nurse. Nurse assistants attend 3 months!

    I am currently in Nursing School and look forward to "earning" the title of nurse!
  7. by   reyna
    no...as the title implice...cna is a nurse's assistant
  8. by   veteranRN
    I once worked in a drs. office with a cma (certified medical assistant). The CMA never directly introduced herself as the nurse but when a pt would call to talk to "a nurse" she would jump right on and give the impression she was the nurse. It seems to be quite common in drs. offices and well tolerated by the dr. I left the position!
  9. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from hogan4736
    EMTs have 8-12 months of education...CNAs have 3-6 weeks...you do the math...

    I respect CNAs, as their work is very arduous...Comparing EMTs and CNAs is like comparing a medic and a nurse (nurse would include LPN)
    Sorry- more misunderstanding. EMTs in some areas refer to to short, evening course: 3 hours x 2 eves x 4 weeks. This course gives emergency training only: splinting, dressings, backboards, vitals, etc.
    So, CNAs would be better trained than these EMTs to provide care in hospital settings.
    Mschrisco
  10. by   barbiedee
    I think there is a difference between a nursing assistant calling themselves a 'nurse', and a patient/resident/family member calling the nursing assistant a nurse. The patient/resident/family member is just not aware of the CNA's job or title. However, a CNA calling themselves a nurse can be illegal in some locations. Where I live, only licensed nurses (LPN, RN, BSN) may legally call themselves a nurse. If you are called a nurse by someone else, I believe it is your job to explain who you are/what your title is. This can also change a lot of expectations of the patient or family members. If they realize you are a nursing assistant, and not a nurse, their expectations of you or your job duties may change. (ie: they will realize why you are not giving out pain medications). The facility where I work is 75% nursing assistants...we couldn't survive without them. They have a tough job...its just not the same job as a nurse.
  11. by   MoJoeRN,C
    There's something to be said for wearing uniforms and caps. Only RNs could wear black stripes, LPNs blue or another color. CNAs no stripes. If they wore a cap with stripes, it constituted passing themselves off as nurses. Name tags with titles are also useful. RN, ARNP, RN,C, LPN, CMT, CMA, etc are useful deliniations. In this case CNA or office assistant/manager etc seems more appropriate. But certainly not "nurse" :angryfire
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    (I am not wearing no stinkin' hat)

    I had 4 months training as a CNA. I will agree that the name CNA needs changed, because "assistant" sounds like you're assisting the nurse herself (himself) with the pt. care, and that's not always the case depending on the situation. Majority of the time, i worked under the nurse's supervision, but saw her all of two times in an 8 hours shift because i was usually in a pt.'s room with a door shut. I did my work alone, and according to the rules of the facility and the state.
  13. by   SCRN1
    Quote from LPN2Be2004
    (I am not wearing no stinkin' hat)

    I had 4 months training as a CNA. I will agree that the name CNA needs changed, because "assistant" sounds like you're assisting the nurse herself (himself) with the pt. care, and that's not always the case depending on the situation. Majority of the time, i worked under the nurse's supervision, but saw her all of two times in an 8 hours shift because i was usually in a pt.'s room with a door shut. I did my work alone, and according to the rules of the facility and the state.
    I understand what you're saying, but assisting the nurse IS what a CNA does. The CNA is doing certain duties that they are allowed to do which frees up the nurse to do everything else. If the CNA duties are not done, then it falls back on the nurse assigned to that patient. The nurse doesn't actually have to be in the room to be "assisted".

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