Are anti-vaccine people conspiracy theorists generally? - page 27

I have an old friend from years ago who I now keep in touch with on Facebook. Her posts are fascinating in the amazing variety of conspiracy theories, some outrageous, some maybe partially true.... Read More

  1. by   MunoRN
    It turns out there is a video version of the herd-immunity domino explanation:
  2. by   hherrn
    Why do nurses need to be educated on social media about anything for which all the information is easily available to anybody capable of critical thought?
    Nurses should know how to access accurate information.
    Imagine this discussion on a medical forum.
  3. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Horseshoe
    From the same link:
    Thank you for this info.

    I should have been clearer with my query. I was actually wondering about all of the latent viruses and any other contaminants that can be found in viruses.
  4. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from heron
    If there are virtually no anti-vaxxers in the thread, why are we being scolded for being mean to them?
    Just be nice to all.
  5. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from wtbcrna
    What is truly sad is to see people even when presented with the evidence refuse to acknowledge they are incorrect.
    So it's a right or wrong issue for you? You need to be right?

    Flies, vinegar, honey. Courtesy and respect toward all. And I'm not the only one who has said this to you.
  6. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Horseshoe
    Your post did not have anything to do with herd immunity, the subject at hand.

    This essay explains it perfectly.

    The Unforgiving Math That Stops Epidemics | Quanta Magazine
    It most assuredly does. Read it again.
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from hherrn
    Why do nurses need to be educated on social media about anything for which all the information is easily available to anybody capable of critical thought?
    Nurses should know how to access accurate information.
    Imagine this discussion on a medical forum.
    We're just having a discussion. If we learn something in the process, great. But don't feel obligated to
    participate if you really don't want to.
  8. by   KatieMI
    Quote from MunoRN
    In the more common strains the vaccines effectiveness is around 60% from year to year, so the number on a scenario where the vaccine "didn't work" don't "seriously outnumber" those for whom it was effective.

    Think of herd immunity as a room full of dominos where the dominos represent a population all susceptible to flu and therefore readily able to transmit the flu to others, by knocking down just one or a few dominoes they could potentially set of a chain reaction that knocks down all the other dominos. Now imagine the same room full of dominos but where you've glued down 50% of the dominos, knocking down that first domino might only cause a few other dominos to fall as the chain reaction can't perpetuate.
    MunoRN, THANK YOU for a great way to explain the subject! With your permission, borrowed and put to good use
  9. by   KatieMI
    Quote from hherrn
    Why do nurses need to be educated on social media about anything for which all the information is easily available to anybody capable of critical thought?
    Nurses should know how to access accurate information.
    Imagine this discussion on a medical forum.
    Honestly, I'd seen discussions of just such level or even below it on SDN.

    Just because we are nurses doesn't mean we're automatically have more or better critical thinking and information management skills. Let's face it - in too many schools, even in BSN programs, "research" is seen as fluffy coursework which serves no parctical purpose except filling the credit hours with "useless paper writing". What is following when students finally get out of school and at practical nursing doesn't help the situation as well. As a result, we're having more and more RNs who do not trust science, do not know how to manage the avalanches of information they're exposed to, are not able to process new knowledge, critique it and apply it to their practice, and, in general, suspicious, if not openly hostile, toward anybody posessing the above skills.

    I cannot say it is the particular problem of nursing or medicine - I live in a city which has more PhDs per capita than any other place comparable by size of population within mainland USA, yet we have very active local antivax lobby, complete with a congressman who keeps and voices similar views. The problem with antivax medical workers, though, is that other people trust them.
  10. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    So it's a right or wrong issue for you? You need to be right?

    Flies, vinegar, honey. Courtesy and respect toward all. And I'm not the only one who has said this to you.
    You claim to be a nurse, and you have issues believing in basic medical/scientific facts. I don't care if you think I'm rude. I'm of the opinion that if you choose not to believe in those basic medical facts then you shouldn't be a Nurse. No one should need to give you an internet hug to make you feel at peace over your confirmation biases.
  11. by   hherrn
    Kooky-
    Thank you for keeping this thread going.
  12. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    It most assuredly does. Read it again.
    No. YOU read it again. Good grief. This is like someone insisting that 1 plus 1 equals 5, and who keeps insisting that everyone re-do the math.

    Done. Not going to keep interacting with someone who cannot do simple math.
    Last edit by Horseshoe on Oct 31, '17
  13. by   hherrn
    Quote from Horseshoe
    No. YOU read it again. Good grief. This is like someone insisting that 1 plus 1 equals 5, and who keeps insisting that everyone re-do the math.

    Done. Not going to keep interacting with someone who cannot do simple math.
    You think you are done.
    Probably not,
    Seems like people try to quit this thread, and they can't.

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